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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Lucius Verus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

Lucius Verus was the co-emperor of Marcus Aurelius, and married his daughter Lucilla. Although held in high esteem by Marcus, he had a reputation for loose living and few mourned his death in 169 A.D.


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Lucius Verus was the co-emperor of Marcus Aurelius, and married his daughter Lucilla. Although held in high esteem by Marcus, he had a reputation for loose living and few mourned his death in 169 A.D.
SH91576. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV 1051, SRCV II 5368, Cohen III 69, RIC III 1333 var. (bust cuirassed), Hunter II 54 var. (bare head, rev. details), VF, well centered, high-points flatly struck, reverse legend weak, weight 29.432 g, maximum diameter 33.29 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Dec 162 - Autumn 163 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES L AVREL VERVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse FELIC AVG TR P III, galley left over waves, Victory standing left on prow, six rowers, two legionary standards and steersman under apluster at stern, S - C low across fields, COS II in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; extremely rare variety; $800.00 (€704.00)
 


Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, 161 - 169 A.D., Mark Antony Restitution

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"Restitution" issue by Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus commemorating the famous legionary denarii of Marc Antony. The legion VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad", was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It must have been chosen for the restitution for its presumably key-role during Verus' successful Parthian campaign.
RS89768. Silver denarius, BMCRE IV p. 456, 500; RIC III p. 248, 443; MIR 18 120-4; RSC I Antony 83; Cohen I Antony 83; SRCV II p. 341, 5236, choice gVF, excellent centering, toning, flow lines, some die wear, small coppery spots, weight 3.031 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 165 - 166 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVGVR III VIR R P C, war galley, five oarsman visible, rowing left over waves, helmsman and rudder in stern; reverse ANTONINVS ET VERVS AVG REST, aquila (legionary eagle) in center, eagle turned right, between two legionary standards, standard on right surmounted by Victory standing left and extending wreath, LEG - VI across center divided by aquila; rare; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00
 


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The crematorium depicted is probably that of Antoninus Pius but it may be the one built by Marcus Aurelius. Both were located in Rome's Campus Martius.
RS89843. Silver denarius, RIC III 596b (S), RSC II 58, BMCRE IV 505, Szaivert MIR 18 187, SRCV II 5206, Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, light toning, flow lines, edge crack, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, posthumous, struck by Marcus Aurelius, 169 A.D.; obverse DIVVS VERVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, pyramidal crematorium of four stories, bottom floor garlanded, door on the second floor, statue of emperor in facing quadriga on top; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72 (2 Dec 2018), lot 520; scarce; $250.00 (€220.00)
 


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In 166, Marcus Aurelius appointed his sons as caesars, while he and Lucius Verus traveled to Germany.
RS92460. Bronze as, RIC III MA1448 (S), Cohen III 282, BMCRE IV 1307, Szaivert MIR 18 129, SRCV II 5416, Hunter II -, VF, nice portrait, light marks, some porosity, some earthen encrustation, weight 12.355 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 165 - summer 166 A.D.; obverse L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right; reverse TR POT VI IMP III COS II, Victory standing facing, head left, crowning a trophy of arms with right hand, palm frond in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


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In 168 A.D., Marcus Aurelius campaigned against the Marcomanni.
RS89842. Silver denarius, RIC III 578, RSC II 310, BMCRE IV 472, Hunter II -, SRCV -, VF, well centered, light toning, flow lines, some die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.111 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 168 A.D.; obverse L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right; reverse TR P VIII IMP IIII COS III (holder of tribunition power 8 years, imperator 4 times, consul 3 times), Aequitas standing half left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; $175.00 (€154.00)
 


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Abila, Decapolis

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Abila in the Decapolis, also known for a time as Seleucia, and ancient Raphana, is now called Quwaylibah, a site occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments. The largest site is located amidst verdant agricultural fields near the modern Ain Quweilbeh spring. Roman temples, Byzantine churches and early mosques lie amidst olive groves and wheat fields.
RP91008. Bronze AE 24, RPC IV online T6512 (3 spec.), Sofaer 10, Rosenberger IV 9, Spijkerman 9, SNG ANS -, VF, well centered, tight flan, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 9.675 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 45o, Abila in Decapolis (Quwaylibah, Jordan) mint, 162 - 163 A.D.; obverse AYT KAICAP Λ AYPOYHPΩC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse CE ABIΛHNW-N I A A I KOI CY (of the people of Seleucia Abila in Coele-Syria), nude Herakles seated left on rocks, right hand resting on grounded club, left hand on rocks behind, ϖKC (year 226) in exergue; rare; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Abila, Decapolis

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Abila in the Decapolis, also known for a time as Seleucia, and ancient Raphana, is now called Quwaylibah, a site occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments. The largest site is located amidst verdant agricultural fields near the modern Ain Quweilbeh spring. Roman temples, Byzantine churches and early mosques lie amidst olive groves and wheat fields.
RP91009. Bronze AE 24, RPC IV online T6512 (3 spec.), Sofaer 10, Rosenberger IV 9, Spijkerman 9, SNG ANS -, VF, well centered on tight flan, sage green patina, earthen deposits, weight 11.291 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, Abila in Decapolis (Quwaylibah, Jordan) mint, 162 - 163 A.D.; obverse AYT KAICAP Λ AYPOYHPΩC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse CE ABIΛHNW-N I A A I KOI CY (of the people of Seleucia Abila in Coele-Syria), nude Herakles seated left on rocks, right hand resting on grounded club, left hand on rocks behind, ϖKC (year 226) in exergue; rare; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


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In late summer or fall of 161, Vologases IV of Parthia captured the Roman client Kingdom of Armenia, expelled its king and installed his own; Pacorus, an Arsacid like himself. In 162, Lucius Verus began the war to recover Armenia and exact vengeance for Parthia's invasions of Armenia and Syria. The Armenian capital Artaxata was recovered in 163. At the end of 163, Verus took the title Armeniacus, despite having never personally seen combat. Marcus Aurelius initially declined to accept the title, but accepted it in 164.
RS92457. Silver denarius, RIC III 491, RSC II156, BMCRE IV 229, Hunter II 8, SRCV II 5354, Choice F, well centered, flow lines, edge cracks, weight 3.279 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 162 - 163 A.D.; obverse IMP L VERVS AVG, bare head right; reverse PROV DEOR TR P III COS II (to the providence of the gods, holder of Tribunitian power for 3 years, consul 2 times), Providentia standing half left, globe in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 (€114.40)
 


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In late summer or fall of 161, Vologases IV of Parthia captured the Roman client Kingdom of Armenia, expelled its king and installed his own; Pacorus, an Arsacid like himself. In 162, Lucius Verus began the war to recover Armenia and exact vengeance for Parthia's invasions of Armenia and Syria. The Armenian capital Artaxata was recovered in 163. At the end of 163, Verus took the title Armeniacus, despite having never personally seen combat. Marcus Aurelius initially declined to accept the title, but accepted it in 164.
RS92458. Silver denarius, RIC III 491, RSC II156, BMCRE IV 229, Hunter II 8, SRCV II 5354, Cohen 156, VF/F, toned, flow lines, weight 3.266 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 162 - 163 A.D.; obverse IMP L VERVS AVG, bare head right; reverse PROV DEOR TR P III COS II (to the providence of the gods, holder of Tribunitian power for 3 years, consul 2 times), Providentia standing half left, globe in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Antioch ad Hippum, Decapolis

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Hippos is an archaeological site located on a hill overlooking the Sea of Galilee in the Mt. Sussita National Park, Israel. Between the 3rd century B.C. and the 7th century A.D., Hippos was the site of a Greco-Roman city, which declined under Muslim rule and was abandoned after an earthquake in 749. Besides the fortified city itself, Hippos controlled two port facilities on the lake and an area of the surrounding countryside. Hippos was part of the Decapolis, or Ten Cities, a region in Roman Jordan, Syria and Israel that were culturally tied more closely to Greece and Rome than to the Semitic ethnoi around.
RP91033. Bronze AE 26, RPC IV Online T6576 (11 spec.); Spijkerman 19; Sofaer 13; SNG ANS 1139, VF, well centered, earthen deposits, scratches, tiny edge splits, weight 10.410 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, Hippos (Mt. Sussita National Park) mint, 7 Mar 161 - Feb 169 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI Λ AYPH-ΛIOC OYHPOC, laureate head right, slight drapery on far (left) shoulder; reverse ANTIO TΩ ΠP IΠ THC IEP K ACYΛOY, Tyche standing left, turreted, cornucopia in left hand, holding bridle of horse standing left on her far side; scarce; $100.00 (€88.00)
 




  



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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVVSVERVS
IMPCAESLAVRELVERVSAVG
IMPCAESLVERVSAVG
IMPLAVRELVERVSAVG
IMPLVERVSAVG
LAVRELVERVSAVGARMENIACVS
LVERVSAVG
LVERVSAVGARMENIACVS
LVERVSAVGARMPARTHMAX
VERVSAVG


REFERENCES|

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Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
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Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Szaivert, W. Die Münzprägung der Kaiser Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus un Commodus (161-192). (Wien, 1984).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Thursday, October 17, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Lucius Verus