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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Faustina Jr.||View Options:  |  |  | 

Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

The daughter, wife, and mother of emperors and empresses, Faustina II was born around 130 A.D. to Antoninus Pius and Faustina I. She was married to her cousin Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. In 146 A.D., she gave birth to the first of 14 children. To celebrate this occasion she was given the title of Augusta, which technically made her superior in rank to her husband. Faustina II was a devoted wife and mother and accompanied her husband on all his military campaigns. Her son Commodus went on to become emperor after his fathers' death, and her daughter Lucilla became Augusta when she married Lucius Verus. She died in the city of Halala in Anatolia in 175 A.D., plagued by baseless rumors about her infidelity. She was deified soon after and a grand temple was erected to her in the city where she died.

Faustina Junior, Augusta, 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta,| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Neapolis,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |19|
The image on the reverse resembles sculptures of Artemis, the Lady of Ephesus, including one at the Ephesus Archaeological Museum and another at the Vatican. The Ionians worshiped Artemis as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian Cybele. Her cult image was adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They have been variously interpreted as accessory breasts, eggs, grapes, acorns, or even bull testes. Excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987/8 found a multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that once adorned the ancient wooden xoanon.Artemis
RP98113. Bronze AE 19, Sofaer 59 (same dies); BMC Palestine p. 56, 69; Rosenberger III 19; RPC IV Online T6349 (8 specs); SNG Cop 17; de Saulcy p. 253, 5; SNG ANS -, nice gF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, high points flat not fully struck, weight 6.831 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 161 - 162 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINAN CEBACTHN, draped bust right, hair in chingon; reverse ΦΛ NEACΠOΛE CYPIAC ΠAΛ-AI (Flavia Neapolis Syria Palestina, the last two letter in exergue and smaller), cult statue of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing headdress, two stags at feet, hands resting on supports, ET - Ч (year 90) divided across field above arms; ex Menashe Landman Collection; rare; $160.00 (€131.20)
 


|Faustina| |Jr.|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius||denarius|
Faustina II was the daughter, wife, and mother of emperors and empresses. When she gave birth to the first of many children she was given the title of Augusta, which for a time made her superior in rank to her husband. She was a devoted wife and mother and accompanied her husband on all his military campaigns.
RP98021. Silver denarius, BMCRE IV p. 405, MA157; RSC II 221; SRCV II 5263; Hunter IV 23; RIC III MA719 corr. (says two children at feet), F, toned, flow lines, scratches, light porosity, edge cracks, weight 2.931 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse TEMPOR FELIC (happy times), Felicitas standing facing, head left, cradling an infant in each arm, flanked by four children standing at her feet, two on each side all raising an arm to her; $90.00 (€73.80)
 


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius, Plotinopolis, Thrace

|Roman| |Thrace| |&| |Black| |Sea|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |Plotinopolis,| |Thrace||AE| |23|
Plotinopolis (modern day Didimochito, Greece) was an important Thracian and Hellenistic town. It was sacked by the Romans in 204 B.C. Trajan created a new city between the two hills surrounding the town and named it Plotinopolis after his wife. Ruins of the town were accidentally found during construction in the 1960s. In the 1980s, a solid gold bust of Trajan was found and is now in the museum at Komotini.
RP62383. Bronze AE 23, Varbanov III 1830; SGICV 1728, gVF, weight 7.626 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 225o, Plotinopolis (Didimochito, Greece) mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 146 - 176 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse ΠΛΩTEINOΠOΛEITΩN, Demeter standing left, ears of grain in right hand, torch in left hand; attractive green patina; scarce; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVAAVGFAVSTINA
DIVAFAVSTINAPIA
DIVAEFAVSTINAVGMATRCASTROR
DIVAEFAVSTINAEPIAE
FAVSTINAAVGANTONINIAVG
FAVSTINAAVGANTONINIAVGPIIFIL
FAVSTINAAVGPIIAVGFIL
FAVSTINAAVGVSTA
FAVSTINAAVGVSTAAVGPIIF
FAVSTINAAVGVSTAAVGPIIFIL
FAVSTINAAVGVSTAPIIAVGFIL
FAVSTINAEAVGANTONINIAVGPIIFIL
FAVSTINAEAVGPIIAVGF
FAVSTINAEAVGPIIAVGFIL


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 3: Marcus Aurelius to Clodius Albinus. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Szaivert, W. Die Münzprägung der Kaiser Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus un Commodus (161-192). (Vienna, 1984).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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