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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Antoninus Pius||View Options:  |  |  | 

Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Titus Aurelius Fulvius Boionius Arrius Antoninus was born around 86 A.D. to a distinguished family. After a typical senatorial career, he made a name for himself as proconsul of Asia. He was adopted as Emperor Hadrian's heir in February 138 A.D. and succeeded soon after. His reign was long and peaceful, a Golden Age of tranquility and prosperity. He died in 161 A.D., leaving Marcus Aurelius as his successor.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
In 148, Antoninus Pius hosted a series of grand games to celebrate Rome's 900th anniversary.
RS97928. Silver denarius, RIC III 177D(g), RSC II 242, BMCRE IV 654 var. (bust left noted), Strack III 190, SRCV II -, gF, radiating flow lines, light toning, light scratches, edge ragged with small cracks, weight 2.642 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 148 - Dec 149 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XII, laureate head left; reverse COS IIII, Aequitas standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; rare bust left; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00
 


|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Antoninus Pius was born to a distinguished family. After a typical senatorial career, he made a name for himself as proconsul of Asia. He was adopted as Hadrian's heir and succeeded soon after. His reign was long and peaceful, a Golden Age of tranquility and prosperity.
RS97937. Silver denarius, RIC III 127D(f), RSC II 230a, BMCRE IV 517, Strack III 160, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, F, nice portrait for the grade, well centered, flow lines, light tone, edge cracks, holed, weight 3.027 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 145 - 161 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse COS IIII, Aequitas standing facing, head left, scales in right hand, long rod vertical in left hand; rare bust left; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00
 


|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
The "ship of state," famously expounded by Plato in the Republic, likens the governance of a state to the command of a vessel. The Romans believed that Fortuna, the goddess of luck and fortune, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, saw Alexander perish as she flew over Syria and Egypt, and at last arriving on Mount Palatine, cast aside her wings to live in Rome forever. This coin was dedicated to Fortuna, depicting holding a rudder, for steering the Roman ship of state to prosperity, symbolized by the cornucopia.
RS97940. Silver denarius, RSC II 860a, RIC III 49(b), Strack III 52, SRCV II 4116 var. (no drapery), Hunter II -, aVF, well centered, highest points weakly struck, lamination defect obv. right field, radiating flow lines, small edge cracks, weight 2.887 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 139 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse TR POT COS II, Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00
 


|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.||denarius|
The pulvinar (plural pulvinaria) was a special couch used for displaying images of the gods, that they might receive offerings at ceremonies such as the lectisternium or supplicatio. In the famous lectisternium of 217 B.C., on orders of the sibylline books, six pulvinaria were arranged, each for a divine male-female pair, identified by Livy as follows:

Jupiter-Juno
Neptune-Minerva
Mars-Venus
Apollo-Diana
Vulcan-Vesta
Mercury-Ceres
RS97454. Silver denarius, RIC III 137, RSC II 345, BMCRE IV 536, Hunter II 141, Strack III 165, SRCV II 4079, VF, toned, flow lines, die wear, edge splits, weight 2.612 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 145 - 161 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII, horizontal fulmen (thunderbolt) on draped pulvinar (throne) of Jupiter and Juno; ex Savoca Coins auction blue 90 (29 Nov 2020), lot 1246; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00
 


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||drachm|
Cybele, the Phrygian "Great Mother" earth goddess, was born a hermaphrodite, but castrated by the gods, she became female. After dire prodigies, including a meteor shower and a failed harvest, seemed to warn of Rome's imminent defeat to Hannibal, the Roman senate consulted the Sibylline oracle. Heeding the oracle's advice, the senate brought worship of Cybele to Rome in 204 B.C. as the first officially sanctioned Eastern cult. After approval, they were dismayed to learn that the priesthood required voluntary self-castration, which was abhorrent to the Romans. Romans were barred from entering the priesthood or even entering the priest's sanctuary. The eunuch priests, recruited from outside Rome, were confined to their sanctuary, leaving only to parade in the streets during festivals in April. Claudius removed the bans on Roman participation, making worship of Cybele and her consort Attis part of the state religion.Cybele
RX92509. Bronze drachm, RPC Online IV.4 T14962; Dattari-Savio 2689; Geissen 1778; Milne 2330; BMC Alexandria p. 121, 1042; Emmett 1600/20 (R1), aF, well centered, porous, edge splits, beveled obverse edge, weight 24.026 g, maximum diameter 32.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 156 - 28 Aug 157 A.D.; obverse AYT K T AIΛ A∆P - ANTWNINOC, laureate head right; reverse Cybele seated left on throne flanked by two seated lions, wearing chiton and peplos, phiale in right hand, resting arm on drum, L - K (year 20) flanking high across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00
 







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ANTONINVSAVGPIVS
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ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPIMPII
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ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXXI
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ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXII
ANTONINVSAVGPIVSPPTRPXIII
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ANTONINVSFXII
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IMPCAESAELANTONINVSAVG
IMPCAESAELIVSANTONINVSAVG
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IMPCAESTAELHADRANTONINVSAVGPIVSPP
IMPCAESTAELHADRIANTONINVSAVGPIVS
IMPCAESTAELHADRIANTONINVSAVGPIVSPP
IMPTAELCAESANTONINVS
IMPTAELCAESANTONINVSAVG
IMPTAELCAESARHADRANTONINVS
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REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926). (Caesar under Hadrian)
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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