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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Aelius||View Options:  |  |  | 

Aelius, Caesar, July or August 136 - 1 January 138 A.D.

In 136, Aelius was adopted by an aging and ailing Hadrian and made caesar, successor to the throne. He had no military experience but had served as a senator and had powerful political connections. He was known for luxurious taste, an extravagant lifestyle, but also poor health. He was never to become emperor, dying before Hadrian, on 1 January 138.


|Aelius|, |Aelius,| |Caesar,| |July| |or| |August| |136| |-| |1| |January| |138| |A.D.|, as
Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men. On this coin, the Caesar, Aelius, the designated successor of the emperor, is identified as the hope for the future of the Roman people. Aelius was never to become emperor, dying shortly before Hadrian.
RB92433. Copper as, RIC II-3 2700, BMCRE III 1931, Hunter II 20, Strack II 895, SRCV II 3993, Cohen II 57, VF, excellent portrait, attractive reverse style, porosity, light corrosion, light deposits, weight 13.051 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, group 2, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, Spes walking left, flower in extended right hand, lifting skirt drapery with left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field just below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $250.00 SALE |PRICE| $225.00


|Aelius|, |Aelius,| |Caesar,| |July| |or| |August| |136| |-| |1| |January| |138| |A.D.|, denarius
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS92435. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2634, RSC II 50, BMCRE III Hadrian 969, SRCV II 3973, Strack II 391, Hunter II 2, F, attractive portrait, nice toning, well centered on a tight flan, light scratches, flan edge a little ragged with small edge splits, weight 3.091 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in left hand, cornucopia in right hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00


|Aelius|, |Aelius,| |Caesar,| |July| |or| |August| |136| |-| |1| |January| |138| |A.D.|, dupondius
Pannonia was conquered by the Romans in the 1st century B.C. but was not completely pacified until the reign of Commodus. Shortly after Aelius was made caesar, Hadrian also made him governor of Pannonia. This type was struck to commemorate this event.
SH32342. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II Hadrian 1071, SRCV II 3988, BMCRE III Hadrian 1936, gem VF, weight 8.398 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, PANNO-NIA and S - C across fields, Pannonia standing facing, head left, holding vexillum in right hand and gathering up drapery in left; scarce; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

LAELIVSCAESAR
LAELIVSCAESARTRPCOSII


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Caliců, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappťes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Hill, P.V. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Friday, February 21, 2020.
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Roman Coins of Aelius