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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Sabina||View Options:  |  |  | 

Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

Vibia Sabina was the wife of Emperor Hadrian, and a grand-niece of Trajan. They had an unhappy marriage and no children. Although she accompanied Hadrian on his many travels, he ignored her and had numerous affairs with both men and women. Sabina had an affair with Suetonius, Hadrian's secretary, in 119. Sabina is said to have remarked that she had taken steps to see she never had children by Hadrian because they would "harm the human race." She may have once aborted a child of theirs. Sabina died in 136 or 137 A.D., perhaps of natural causes or perhaps poisoned by Hadrian.

Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Perinthos, Thrace

|Perinthus|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Perinthos,| |Thrace|, |AE| |20|
Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself.
RP92876. Bronze AE 20, CN Online Perinthos CN_4717, Schonert Perinthos 380, Varbanov III 100 (R6), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, gVF, nice portrait, uneven patina, a little off center, weight 4.140 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABINA - CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse Π-EPIN-ΘIWN, Demeter standing left, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Perinthos, Thrace

|Perinthus|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Perinthos,| |Thrace|, |AE| |20|
Perinthos, later called Heraclea and Marmara Eregli today, is 90 km west of Istanbul near a small pointed headland on the north shore of the Marmara Sea. It is said to have been a Samian colony, founded about 599 B.C. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself.
RP92875. Bronze AE 20, CN Online Perinthos CN_4717, Schonert Perinthos 380, Varbanov III 100 (R6), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, small edge splits, porosity, weight 5.147 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABINA - CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse Π-EPIN-ΘIWN, Demeter standing left, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


|Sabina|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Hadrian|, |denarius|
Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was honored for her role promoting understanding and marital harmony in the imperial household, but she did not serve Sabina well. Although she accompanied Hadrian on his many travels, he ignored her and had numerous affairs with both men and women.
RS92431. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2571, BMCRE III Hadrian 929, RSC II 3a, Hunter II 10, Strack II 376, SRCV II 3918, aVF, toned, scratches and bumps, flan ragged with edge cracks, weight 3.074 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 136 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right, hair in a roll at the front and a long plait down the back; reverse CONCORDIA AVG (harmony of the Emperor), Concordia standing half left, head left, patera in extended right hand, leaning with left arm on column (column not clearly visible), double cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


|Sabina|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Hadrian|, |sestertius|
Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RB92432. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 2596 (S), BMCRE Hadrian III 1883, Hunter II 34, Strack II 810, SRCV II 3941, Cohen II 74, F, a little rough from corrosion, uneven strike and slightly off center with half of each legend weak/off flan, weight 21.370 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 137 - early 138 B.C.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRAINI AVG P P, draped bust right, hair in long plait falling down back of neck and roll above stephane in front; reverse VENERI GENETRICI (to Mother Venus), Venus standing facing, head right, raising cloak from shoulder with her right hand, apple in left hand, S C (senatus consulto) across field slightly below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian

|Members| |Auction| |Listed|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Hadrian|, |denarius|
Pudicitia was the personification of modesty and chastity. The empress Lucilla apparently felt she had too much chastity and her husband too little. It was not considered adultery for a Roman husband to have sex with slaves or unmarried women. The historian Spartianus wrote that after Lucilla complained, Lucius Verus reproached her: "Uxor enim dignitatis nomen est, non voluptatis" (Wife is the name of dignity, not bliss).
MA95542. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 p. 242, 2507; BMCRE III Hadrian 911; Strack II 374; RSC II 62; Hunter II 5; SRCV II 3922, F, rough corrosion, weight 2.475 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 130 - 133 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, diademed and draped bust right, hair combed over stephane and in long plait down neck; reverse PVDICITIA, Pudicitia standing left, veiled, adjusting veil with right hand, resting left hand at side; $25.00 (23.00)







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVAAVGSABINA
DIVAAVGVSTASABINA
SABINAAVGVSTA
SABINAAVGVSTAHADRIANIAVGPP


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calic, E.X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Hill, P.V. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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