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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Hadrian||View Options:  |  |  | 

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Hadrian, one of the "Five Good Emperors," abandoned the expansionist policy of Trajan and established a policy of defense and consolidation during which Hadrian's Wall in Britain was constructed. He traveled to nearly every province of the Empire, more than any other emperor, often ordering grandiose building programs to improve infrastructure and the quality of life in those regions. An ardent admirer of Greece, he sought to make Athens the cultural capital of the Empire and ordered the construction of many opulent temples in the city. He spent much of his time with the military; usually wore military attire and even dined and slept amongst the soldiers. He ordered military training and drilling to be more rigorous and made use of false reports of attack to keep the army alert. He suppressed the Bar Kokhba revolt in Judaea, renaming the province Syria Palaestina.Roman Empire 125 AD

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Apameia, Phrygia

|Apameia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Apameia,| |Phrygia||hemiassarion|NEW
While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in the water and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to an evergreen tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
RP97259. Brass hemiassarion, RPC Online III 2585 (14 spec); BMC Phrygia p. 95, 152; SNG Mun XXIV 154; SNG Tub VI 3983; SNG Hunt I 2028, Weber III 7035, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck on a tight flan, nice green patina, light marks, weight 4.410 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AY KAI TP A∆PIANOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse MAPCY/AC (upward on left last two letters in left field), AΠAME/ΩN (downward on right, last two letters in right field), satyr Marsyas walking right, nude but for nebris (skin of a fawn) tied on his neck and flying behind, playing Athena's double flute; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 92 (2 Aug 2020), lot 520; $220.00 (€180.40)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |24|NEW
Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
JD98120. Bronze AE 24, RPC Online III 4008 (3 spec.); Sofaer p. 101, 129; Rosenberger I p. 55, 156; BMC Palestine -; SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -, VF, attractive green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, reverse strike a bit weak, off center, weight 9.277 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 120 - 121 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC, laureate head left; reverse ACKAΛΩ, Tyche-Astarte standing left on prow of galley, standard in right hand, aphlaston in left hand, incense altar lower left, dove over ∆KC (year 224) lower right; only one sale of this type from year 224 with head left recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; extremely rare; $150.00 (€123.00) ON RESERVE


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Chalcis ad Belum, Chalcidice, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Chalcis| |ad| |Belum,| |Chalcidice,| |Syria||AE| |21|
Trajan's last coinage struck at Chalcis ad Belum used the same reverse, dated KE. Year 25 of the local era must have been Autumn 116 - Autumn 117 A.D.; thus the era of the city began in Autumn 92 A.D. The KE reverse was used for Hadrian's coinage only for the short time after the mint learned he was the new emperor until the local New Year's day (perhaps 29 August). When the New Year began the date was changed to B referring to Hadrian's second regnal year (a new regnal year began on New Year's day, not the one year anniversary of rule).
RP97251. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3471A (1 spec., added post publication); Butcher CRS p. 437, 15 var. (obv. leg.); SNG Hunterian II 2711 var. (same, slight drapery), VF, near black patina with red earthen highlighting, tight flan, marks, edge a little ragged, weight 9.023 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Chalcis ad Belum (Qinnasrin, Syria) mint, Autumn 119 - Autumn 120 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC Θ TPA YI Θ NEP YI - A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ΦΛ XAΛ/KI∆EWN / ∆ (Flavius Chalkis [year] 4) in three lines, all within laurel wreath of eight bunches of leaves, closed at the top with a jewel; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 12 (31 May, 2020), part of lot 2018; very rare; $120.00 (€98.40)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||obol|
In 127 A.D., Hadrian, acting on the advice of his proconsul of Asia, Gaius Minicius Fundanus, determined that Christians shall not be put to death without a trial.
RX92542. Bronze obol, RPC Online III 5681; Geissen 961; Dattari 1915; Milne 1236; BMC Alexandria p. 104, 894; SNG Cop 337; Kampmann 32.436; Emmett 1149/11 (R1), aVF, partial green patina, obverse edge beveled, porous, many tiny edge splits, weight 5.184 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 126 - 28 Aug 127 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CEB, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse two cornucopias, upright tops curving outward, overflowing with fruits, LIA (year 11) between; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (€49.20)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Bostra,| |Arabia||AE| |20|
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis.
RY94938. Bronze AE 20, Spijkerman 2 (same dies); RPC Online III 4083 (21 spec.); Kindler Bostra 16; Sofaer 3; BMC Arabia p. 14, 3 - 6; SNG ANS 1168; SNG Cop -, F, irregular flan, orange earthen highlights, weight 6.129 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, 11 Aug 117 - 10 Jul 138 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPAT KAICAP TPAIANOC A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse bust of Arabia right, wearing turreted crown and mantle blown out behind, small figure of a seated child held in each arm, APABIA below; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 (€49.20)
 







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|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

AVGVSTVSHADRIANVS
AVGVSTVSHADRIANVSPP
DIVVSHADRIANVSAVG
HADRIANVSAVGCOSIIIPP
HADRIANVSAVGVST
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVS
HADRIANVSAVGVSTVSPP
IMPCAEDITRAIANFDIVNERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAEDIRAPARFDIVINERNEPTRAHADRIANOAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIAHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARTRAIANVSHADRIANVSAVGPMTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESHADRIANDIVINERTRAIANOPTFIL
IMPCAESTRAHADRIANOAVGPP
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRA
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOAVGDIVITRAPARTHF
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOPTAVGGERDAC
IMPCAESTRAIANHADRIANOOPTAVGGERDAC


REFERENCES|

Abdy, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II - Part 3, From AD 117 - 138, Hadrian. (London, 2019).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Blum, G. "Numismatique D'Antinoos" in JIAN 16. (Athens, 1914). pp. 33 - 70.
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Delegido Moran, C. Aprovisionamiento, circulación y uso de la moneda de plata en Hispania (siglos I-III d.C.): El Tesoro de Llíria. (Valencia, 2014).
Hill, P. The Dating and Arrangement of the Undated Coins of Rome, A.D. 98-148. (London, 1970).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil II: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit des Hadrian. (Stuttgart, 1933).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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