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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Nerva||View Options:  |  |  | 

Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

Nerva was an elderly senator when, after the death of emperor Domitian in 96 A.D, the senate asked him to be emperor. Although popular with the senate and the people of Rome, he was not appreciated by the Army. To placate them he raised the great general Trajan to the rank of Caesar in late October 97 A.D. He died on 25 January 98 A.D.


|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
Nerva maintained that he had liberated Rome from the tyranny of Domitian and restored a constitutionally-based regime. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. and many Mexican coins.
SH94036. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 86, BMCRE III 112, BnF III 100, Cohen II 114, SRCV II 3050, Hunter I -, Choice gVF, well centered, nice portrait, mottled patina, scattered tiny pits, weight 19.627 g, maximum diameter 34.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS PVBLICA (freedom of the people), Libertas standing left, pileus liberatis (freedom cap) in right hand, staff in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $1570.00 SALE |PRICE| $1413.00
 


|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.|, |as|
Nerva maintained that he had liberated Rome from the tyranny of Domitian and restored a constitutionally-based regime. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. and many Mexican coins.
RB92860. Copper as, RIC II 86, BMCRE II 131, BnF I 117, Cohen II 115, Hunter I 56; Cohen II 115; SRCV II -, F, nice green patina, nice portrait, light deposits, light marks, some porosity, uneven strike with parts of legends and part of Liberty weak, weight 9.893 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS PVBLICA (freedom of the people), Libertas standing half left, head left, pileus (freedom cap) in right hand, rod in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking below center; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.|, |as|
On 18 Sep 96, the same day Domitian was murdered, Nerva was declared emperor by the Senate. He recalled citizens exiled by Domitian. Under Nerva, the Roman Senate regained much of the power usurped by Domitian. This is the beginning of the Era of the Five Good Emperors.
RB91570. Copper as, RIC II 86, BMCRE II 131, BnF III 112, Hunter I 56, Cohen 115, SRCV II -, F/aF, parts of legends weak/off flan, corrosion, weight 10.638 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Libertas standing left, pileus in right hand, rod in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field at center; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVVSAVGVSTVS
IMPNERVACAESAVGGERMPMTRPII
IMPNERVACAESAVGGERMPMTRPOTPPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPCOSIIDESIGNIIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPCOSIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPCOSIIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPIICOSIIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPOT
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPOTPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPOTII
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPPPCOSIIII
IMPNERVACAESAVGPONTMAXTR


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. I: De Pompeyo Magno a Matidia (Del 81 a.C. al 117 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Giard, J. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, III Du soulèvement de 68 après J.-C. a Nerva. Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Friday, February 28, 2020.
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Roman Coins of Nerva