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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
A coin this beautiful might sell for twice this price or more. This coin, however, was expertly smoothed and has an enhanced artificial patina. Here at FORVM we inform you of this issue, which might go unsubscribed by some sellers. This smoothing and patina were probably made necessary by active corrosion. It should be maintained in a climate controlled environment, waxed occasionally, and is at risk of returning active corrosion. This bargain priced coin is sold, as is, no returns.
SH98432. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 2398, BMCRE III 1545, Strack II 702, Cohen II 1364, Banti 710, SRCV II 3645, Hunter II 561, VF, excellent portrait, well centered and struck, smoothing, enhanced patina, at risk for active corrosion - sold as is, no returns, weight 24.764 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse Diana standing left, arrow in right hand, bow in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; sold as is, no returns; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Amisos, Pontos

|Pontos|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Amisos,| |Pontos||drachm|
The Romans conquered Amisus in 71 B.C. during the Third Mithridatic War and Amisus became part of Bithynia et Pontus province. Around 46 B.C., during the reign of Julius Caesar, Amisus became the capital of Roman Pontus. From the period of the Second Triumvirate up to Nero, Pontus was ruled by several client kings, as well as a queen, Pythodorida of Pontus, a granddaughter of Mark Antony. From 62 A.D. it was directly ruled by Roman governors, most famously by Trajan's appointee Pliny the Younger. The estimated population of the city around 150 A.D. was between 20,000 and 25,000, a large city for that time. The city functioned as the commercial capital for the province of Pontus; beating its rival Sinope due to its position at the head of the trans-Anatolia highway.
RS99248. Silver drachm, RPC III 1279 (5 spec.), Recueil Gnral 91, Nordb Amisus 5b, BMC Pontus -, gF, dark spots, part of obv. legend unstruck, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.699 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 210o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, year 167, 135 - 136 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI TPA A∆PI-ANOC CEB Π Π YΠ Γ, laureate head right; reverse AMICOV EΛEVΘEPAC ETOVC PΞZ (Amisos, free city, [year] 167), Hera standing left, wearing diadem, apple in right hand, scepter in left hand; first example of this type handled by Forum, zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Aelius, Caesar, July or August 136 - 1 January 138 A.D.

|Aelius|, |Aelius,| |Caesar,| |July| |or| |August| |136| |-| |1| |January| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
In Roman religion, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. The cult of Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was of special importance to the imperial household. She is usually depicted wearing a long cloak and holding a patera (sacrificial bowl), a cornucopia (symbol of prosperity), or a caduceus (symbol of peace).
RS99257. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 Hadrian 2625, BMCRE III Hadrian 981, Hunter II 9, RSC II 1, SRCV II -, gF, nice portrait, toned, encrustations, scratches, die wear, shallow lamination defect obv. left field, edge split/cracks, weight 2.780 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, Concordia enthroned left, patera in right hand, resting left elbow on cornucopia balanced on ground, CONCORD in exergue; $240.00 SALE PRICE $216.00


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Abila, Decapolis, Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Abila,| |Decapolis,| |Arabia||AE| |25|
Abila in the Decapolis, also known for a time as Seleucia, and ancient Raphana, is now called Quwaylibah, a site occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments. The largest site is located amidst verdant agricultural fields near the modern Ain Quweilbeh spring. Roman temples, Byzantine churches and early mosques lie amidst olive groves and wheat fields.
RP98852. Bronze AE 25, RPC IV.3 Online 6514, Spijkerman 11, Rosenberger IV 12, SNG ANS 1122 ff., Sofaer -, VF, well centered, bold strike, green patina, light corrosion, small edge crack, weight 11.659 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Abila in Decapolis (Quwaylibah, Jordan) mint, 166 - 167 A.D.; obverse AYT KAICAP Λ AYPOYHPOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CEABIΛHNW-NIAAΓKOICY, nude Herakles seated left on rock, grounded club in right hand, left hand on rocks behind, ΛC ([year] 230) in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 71 (28 May 2020), lot 686; ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 2 (30 Aug 2018), lot 389; $220.00 SALE PRICE $198.00


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

|Lucius| |Verus|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.||denarius|
In 162, Lucius Verus began war with the Parthians after Vologases IV invaded Syria and Armenia. The Romans would be victorious but the returning army would bring back a pandemic known as the Antonine Plague. The plague would significantly depopulate the entire Roman Empire.
RS99245. Silver denarius, RIC III MA482, RSC II 155, BMCRE IV 202, Hunter II 7, SRCV II -, aVF, toned, radiating flow lines, marks, edge cracks, weight 3.136 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 161 - Dec 162 A.D.; obverse IMP L AVREL VERVS AVG, bare head right; reverse PROV DEOR TR P II COS II, Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
In 136 A.D., following the Bar Kokhba revolt, Hadrian absorbed Judaea and Galilee into a large new province, Syria-Palaestina, comprised of the Levant and western Mesopotamia. In the north (Syria, Lebanon and Southern Turkey) the population was mainly Aramaic speaking peoples and, especially in the main cities, Greco-Roman settlers and Hellenized Jews. Assyrians were the largest group in Mesopotamia. Arameans, Nabataeans, Arabs and Bedouins lived in southern Syrian Desert. In the southern Levant, until about 200 A.D., despite the JewishRoman wars, Jews still formed a majority of the population, living alongside Samaritans and Greeks. By the Byzantine period, the Jews had become a minority, living alongside Samaritans, pagan Greco-Syriacs and a large Syriac Christian community.
RS98727. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2199, RSC II 717, BMCRE III 629, Hunter 209, Strack II 237, SRCV II 3492, VF, light toning, flow lines, die wear, irregular edge, weight 2.858 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 210o, Rome mint, 136 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FIDES PVBLICA (loyalty of the public), Fides standing facing, head right, grain ears downward at side in right hand, raising plate of fruit to shoulder height in left hand; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius

|Faustina| |Sr.|, |Faustina| |Sr.,| |Augusta| |25| |February| |138| |-| |Early| |141,| |Wife| |of| |Antoninus| |Pius||denarius|
The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is an ancient Roman temple in Rome, adapted as a Roman Catholic church, Chiesa di San Lorenzo in Miranda. It is in the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, opposite the Regia. The temple was begun by Antoninus Pius in 141 and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 A.D., the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius. The ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its pronaos are 17 metres high. The rich bas-reliefs of the frieze under the cornice, of garlanded griffons and candelabri, were often copied from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. San Lorenzo in Miranda
RS99255. Silver denarius, RIC III AP343 (S), BMCRE IV AP339, RSC II 1, SRCV II 4573, Hunter II 14, Choice VF, well centered, flow lines, uneven toning, struck with worn dies, small edge cracks, weight 3.267 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 150 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse AED DIV FAVSTINAE, hexastyle temple of Diva Faustina, containing seated statue of the deity, eagle in pediment, victories as acroteria, trellis-work fencing in foreground at foot of steps; scarce; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D. Pisidia, Antiochia

|Pisidia|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.| |Pisidia,| |Antiochia||AE| |20|
Antiochia in Pisidia, also know as Antiochia in Phrygia, and under the Roman Empire as Antiochia Caesareia or Antiochia Colonia Caesarea, was on the border of Pisidia and Phrygia, at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Central Anatolian regions.
RP98025. Bronze AE 20, Krzyzanowska 139, pl. 4 (dies not listed); RPC IV.3 T7338; BMC Lycia p. 177, 9; SNG BnF 1087; SNGvA 4922; SNG Righetti 1328, VF, well centered, highlighting desert patina, flow lines, light crackling corrosion, strike slightly weak, weight 3.381 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antiochia (near Yalva, Turkey) mint, as caesar, c. 160 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVRELIVS, bare head right; reverse ANTIOCHEAE COLONIAE, eagle standing half right, head right, wings displayed; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY99043. Bronze as, McAlee 421(f); RPC Online III 3484; Butcher CRS 189; Wruck 131; SNG Hunter II 2908; BMC Galatia -, F, large flan, nice green patina, legend weakly struck, spots of light corrosion/porosity, obv. edge beveled, weight 14.963 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR NER-VA AVG III COS, laureate head right; reverse large S C (senatus consulto), small ς (6th officina) below, all within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves closed with a pellet in annulet at the top; from a Las Vegas dealer; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.||denarius|
Antoninus Pius was born to a distinguished family. After a typical senatorial career, he made a name for himself as proconsul of Asia. He was adopted as Hadrian's heir and succeeded soon after. His reign was long and peaceful, a Golden Age of tranquility and prosperity.
RS97937. Silver denarius, RIC III 127D(f), RSC II 230a, BMCRE IV 517, Strack III 160, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, F, nice portrait for the grade, well centered, flow lines, light tone, edge cracks, holed, weight 3.027 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 145 - 161 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse COS IIII, Aequitas standing facing, head left, scales in right hand, long rod vertical in left hand; rare bust left; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00




  







Catalog current as of Wednesday, May 18, 2022.
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