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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Delphi, Phokis

|Phokis|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Delphi,| |Phokis||AE| |21|
Delphi is a town on Mount Parnassus in the south of mainland Greece. It's the site of the 4th-century-B.C. Temple of Apollo, once home to a legendary oracle. This extensive mountainside archaeological complex contains the remains of the sanctuaries of Apollo and Athena Pronaia, as well as an ancient stadium and theater. Delphi Archaeological Museum displays artifacts found among the ruins.
RP111645. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 429.6 (this coin, 7 spec.); BCD Lokris 394 (this coin); Svoronos p. 36, 55, pl. XXVII, 13; BMC Central p. 28, 25 pl. IV, 16; SNG Cop 156, VF, nice green patina, light roughness, weight 5.289 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Delphi (Greece) mint, obverse AY KAI TPAIANOC AΔPIANOC AYΓ (Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadrianus Augustus), laureate bust of Hadrian right, bare chest (heroic bust), aegis on left shoulder; reverse ΔΕΛΦΩN, Apollo Citharoedus standing right, wearing long chiton and long chlamys, playing Kithara (lyre); ex Numismatica Ars Classica auction 55 (8 Oct 2010), lot 394 (price realized 1,500 CHF, plus fees); ex BCD Collection ; rare; $1800.00 SALE PRICE $1620.00


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.||sestertius|
The fiscus Iudaicus was an annual tax imposed on Jews after the destruction of Jerusalem and its Temple. The amount was two denarii, equivalent to the one-half of a shekel Jews had previously paid to the Temple of Jerusalem. The tax applied to Jews throughout the empire and, while the tax paid for the Temple of Jerusalem was payable only by adult men between the ages of 20 and 50, the fiscus Iudaicus was imposed on all Jews, including women, children, the elderly, and even Jewish slaves. To add to the humiliation, the tax went to the pagan Temple of Capitoline Jupiter in Rome. Domitian strictly enforced the tax on those who attempted to concealed their identity to avoid the tax. Suetonius relates that an old man of 90 was stripped to see whether he was circumcised and therefore Jewish. This coin commemorates the fisci Iudaici calumnia sublata (abolition of malicious prosecution in connection with the Jewish tax) reforms eliminating the harsh policies of Domitian, but not the tax. It is not known when the tax was formally abolished. Some historians credit the emperor Julian with its abolition in about 361 or 362.
SL111602. Orichalcum sestertius, Hendin 6634b (R), RIC II 82 (S), BMCRE III 105, BnF III 97, Hunter I 45, Cohen II 57, NGC Ch F, 4/5, 1/5 (6155649-001), weight 23.27 g, maximum diameter 34 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FISCI IVDAICI CALVMNIA SVBLATA, date palm tree (symbol of Judaea), S - C (senatus consulto) across field; ex CNG e-auction 487 (10 Mar 2021), 530; ex Gorny auction 267 (17 Oct 2019), 3624; ex Shlomo Moussaieff Collection (London, acquired between 1948 and 1980s); NGC| Lookup; rare; $520.00 SALE PRICE $468.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea, Extremely Rare Duel Dated Variant

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea,| |Extremely| |Rare| |Duel| |Dated| |Variant||AE| |24|
RPC Online III notes of their specimen, "The date does seem to begin with E, even though one would expect ς with year 4 of the second era. Confirmation required. If correctly read, it might show that the Hadrianic era began at a different time of year from the normal city era, or it might just be a mistake, as commonly happened at Gaza." Our coin appears to have the expected date, but with a reversed ς.
RP111379. Bronze AE 24, Unpublished variant, RPC Online III 4014A var. (EKC, the only known specimen), VF, attractive highlighting earthen deposits, rev. off center, weight 12.265 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse CEBAC-TOC (starting counterclockwise on right, ending counterclockwise on left), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ACKΛAW upward on left, Tyche-Astarte standing half left on prow, head left, vexillum standard in right hand, aphlaston in left hand, LΔ (year 4 [of Hadrian]) over incense altar inner left; dove standing left over ΣKC ([year] 226 [of Ascalon], Σ reversed) lower right; extremely rare; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Nicomedia, Bithynia

|Nikomedia|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Nicomedia,| |Bithynia||AE| |22|
Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa near Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
RP112810. Bronze AE 22, RPC Online IV T5599 (3 spec.) var. (laur. head); Rec Gen II.3 74; BMC Pontus p. 182, 17 var. (same); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, F, dark patina, high points and parts of legends weak, light deposits, rev. slightly off center, weight 6.872 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, Aug 138 - 7 Mar 161 A.D.; obverse AVT KAICAP ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse NIKOMHΔEIAC, galley with sail left, NEOKOPOY, in exergue; ex Leu Numismatik auction 25 (11-14 Mar 2023), lot 4116 (part of); ex European collection (formed before 2005); the only specimen known to FORVM with this bust variant; extremely rare; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

|Faustina| |Jr.|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius||denarius|
Faustina Junior and Marcus Aurelius had 14 children. Commodus was the tenth of the fourteen children and the only son to survive. His twin brother Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antonius died at the age of four.
RS110253. Silver denarius, RIC III AP502a, RSC II 54, BMCRE IV AP1086, Hunter II 13, SRCV II 4704, EF, choice obv., rose tone on luster, radiating flow lines, rev. a little off center, mild die wear, weight 2.829 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, 154 - 156 A.D.; obverse FAUSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right with head bare, hair waved and coiled on back of head; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia seated left, flower in right hand, left forearm resting on cornucopia atop globe; ex Inasta (San Marino) auction 100 (24 June 2022), lot 238; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius, Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||drachm|
This coin was struck during the reign of her father Antoninus Pius. Faustina II was the daughter, wife, and mother of emperors and empresses. When she gave birth to the first of many children she was given the title of Augusta, which for a time made her superior in rank to her husband. She was a devoted wife and mother and accompanied her husband on all his military campaigns.
RX110732. Bronze drachm, Geissen 1954 (same obv. die); RPC Online IV.4 T13703; BMC Alexandria p. 163, 1334; Kampmann 38.60; Emmett 1976; Dattari 3279 var. (L - IΔ), F, attractive green-brown patina, centered, most of legend weak/unstruck, small edge splits, obv. edge beveled, weight 25.632 g, maximum diameter 33.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 150 - 28 Aug 151 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTINA CEB EVCEB ΘVΓ (from upper right), draped bust right; reverse Athena standing facing, head left, wearing crested helmet, chiton with diplois and aegis, Nike in her extended right hand offering wreath and bearing palm frond, spear vertical in left hand, L I-Δ (year 14) divided across fields, no shield; $240.00 SALE PRICE $216.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.||sestertius|
In 165, the Parthians sued for peace after Lucius Verus captured Artaxata, Seleucia on the Tigris, and Ctesiphon. The war began in 162, when Parthia invaded Syria and Armenia. Unfortunately the victorious army returned bringing a pandemic known as the Antonine Plague, which significantly depopulated and greatly weakened the Roman Empire.
RB112563. Orichalcum sestertius, SRCV II 5010, RIC III 931 corr. (obv legend), BMCRE IV 1289, MIR 18 142-6/30, Hunter II 120, Cohen III 807, aVF, nice green patina, attractive portrait, centered but tight squared flan cutting off much of legends, weight 19.773 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, summer - Dec 166 A.D.; obverse M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XX IMP IIII COS III, Victory standing facing, looking right, nude to waist, hanging shield inscribed VIC PAR on palm tree; from the Collection of Dr. Jregen Buschek; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Tiberias, Galilee

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Tiberias,| |Galilee||AE| |14|
Tiberias was founded by Herod Antipas in 20 A.D. on the shore of Galilee and served as the capital of the province until 61 A.D. In time Tiberias became a very important Jewish religious center.
JD111121. Bronze AE 14, RPC Online III 3930; SNG ANS 1105; Lindgren 1488; BMC Palestine p. 7, 18; Rosenberger III 10; Sofaer 7; Kindler Tiberias 5, aF, highlighting earthen deposits, porous, weight 2.554 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Tiberias (Israel) mint, 107 - 108 A.D.; obverse AY KAI NE TPAIANOC CE ΓEΔ (Imperator Caesar Nerva Traianus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus), laureate head right; reverse TIBEP KΛAY, anchor, date L - (year 90) flanking shaft; rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RS112930. Silver denarius, RIC II 13, RSC II 6, BnF III 13, BMCRE III 24, Hunter I 9, SRCV II -, VF, centered on a tight flan, mild roughness, weight 3.397 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse AEQVITAS AVGVST (fairness of the emperor), Aequitas standing half left, head left, wearing stephane, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

|Faustina| |Jr.|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius||denarius|
Although many coin references classify Fecunditas as a personification of fertility rather than as an actual deity, Fecunditas was recognized as a Roman divinity by Nero, who erected a statue to her. Tacitus notes that upon the birth of Claudia Neronis, the senate decreed the construction of a temple of Fertility to be built at Antium. Fecunditas is always portrayed as a female figure holding a child, or children and often a scepter, cornucopia, palm branch or caduceus. Sometimes the children are depicted standing at her feet. Coins portraying her usually advertise the fertility of the imperial family.
RS112535. Silver denarius, RIC III MA677; RSC II 99; BMCRE IV MA91; SRCV II 5252; Hunter II, p. 351, 4 var. (bust, pearls), Choice VF, radiating flow lines, well centered, toned, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.565 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 150o, Rome mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas (fertility) standing half right, head right, long scepter vertical in right hand, infant in extended left hand; $190.00 SALE PRICE $171.00




  







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