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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors
Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RB95780. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 260 (S), BMCRE III 1203, Hunter II 358, SRCV II 3625, Cohen II 1207 var. (no drapery), Choice aEF, dark patina, light deposits, spots of corrosion, weight 27.215 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 119 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG P M TR P COS III, laureate bust right, bare chest, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse PROVIDENTIA DEORVM (to the foresight of the gods), Hadrian standing facing, togate, lituus (or scroll?) in left hand, head left looking at eagle flying right with scepter held in talons, extending right hand to receive scepter from eagle, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; scarce; $990.00 (910.80)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 134 A.D.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |134| |A.D.||dupondius|
Eurypylos was a Mysian hero of the Trojan War. His image is otherwise unknown on coinage. Like Bellerophon at Corinth and Dionysos at Tium, this image of a local hero appears modeled on Antinous. Homer (Odyssey 11.522) has Odysseus say that Eurypylus was, next to Memnon, the most beautiful man he had ever seen.

The strategos I. Pollion is named on several coin types of Pergamon during the reign of Hadrian, including one for Sabina (RPC III 1737) and another for Antinous (RPC III, 1738).

The link between Pergamon and Paphos, evidenced by this coin, is not well understood. However, the same reverse was used, from Hadrian to Philip I, on coins struck to honor an alliance between Sardes and Paphos.
RP96071. Orichalcum dupondius, RPC Online III 1740 (4 spec.), SNG BnF 1897, Weber 5206, SNG Cop -, BMC Mysia -, F, porous, reverse off center, countermark obscure, weight 11.652 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, time of Hadrian, c. 134 A.D.; obverse HPΩC EYPYΠYΛOC (Hero Eurypylos), head of hero Eurypylos (with the features of Antinous) right, flowing hair, uncertain oval countermark; reverse ΠEPΓAMHNΩN EΠI CTP ΠΩΛΛIΩNOC (Pergamon, struck under strategos Pollion), temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, in which conical xoanon, semicircular walled courtyard, ΠAΦIA (of Paphos) across the courtyard; extremely rare, the 5th known; $970.00 (892.40)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Nicomedia, Bithynia

|Bithynia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Nicomedia,| |Bithynia||AE| |26|NEW
Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa near Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
RP92638. Bronze AE 26, RPC IV.1 T9895 (1 spec.), Rec Gen 144(2), SNG Cop 568, SNGvA -, Corsten -, aVF, well centered, earthen highlights, porous, weight 10.629 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 30o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, obverse A K M AV KO ANTΩNI, laureate head right; reverse MHT NEΩ NEIKOMH∆, Athena standing left, wearing crested helmet, small galley in extended right hand, grounded vertical spear and round shield in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection, this is the second known and finest know specimen of the type; extremely rare; $500.00 (460.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Curtis Clay suggests that this issue was struck in preparation for Commodus' proposed visit to Alexandria, prior to his assassination.
RS96923. Silver denarius, Bickford-Smith p. 54, note 7; RIC III -; MIR -; BMCRE -; RSC -, aVF, well centered on a tight flan, toned, small edge cracks, weight 2.588 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, late 192 A.D.; obverse IM COMM ANTONINVS PIVS TR P II, laureate head right; reverse LIB AVG P M TR P XVIII COS VII P P, Libertas standing slightly left, head left, pileus (freedom cap - worn by freed slaves) in right hand, vindicta (rod) in vertical in left hand, star upper left field; very rare; $500.00 (460.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||drachm|
The Nilometer measured the height of the annual Nile flood. Sixteen cubits was considered the ideal height of the annual Nile flood. Less could mean drought or famine. Even in modern times, grand celebrations were held when the flood reached 16 cubits. In years when the flood failed to reach 16 cubits, the celebrations were canceled, and prayers and fasting were held instead. The peak flood occurred at the end of August, which explains why the Egyptian year began on 29 August.
RX95862. Bronze drachm, RPC Online IV.4 T15735 (3 spec.); Dattari-Savio pl. 138, 2705bis var. (draped); Emmett 1613/10 (R5); Geissen -; Milne -; BMC Alexandria -; SNG Cop -, aF, well centered, light corrosion, obverse edge beveled, weight 20.203 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 146 - 28 Aug 147; obverse AYT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTWNINOC CEB EYC, laureate head right; reverse L ∆E-KATOY (year 10), Nike standing right, nude to the waist, left foot on helmet, inscribing NI/KH on an oval shield set on her left knee and a column before her; extremely rare; $350.00 (322.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||drachm|
Elpis is the personification and spirit of hope. She was depicted as a young woman, usually carrying flowers or a cornucopia in her hands. Elpis (hope) was the last item in Pandora's box, the one item, that did not escape.
RX92508. Bronze drachm, Dattari-Savio 2537 (same dies), RPC Online IV.4 T15426, Emmett 1501/5 (R4), Geissen -, Milne -, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, BMC Alexandria -, Kampmann -, Choice aF, nicely centered, attractive toned brown surfaces, a few light scratches, small edge cracks, weight 22.289 g, maximum diameter 34.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 141 - 28 Aug 142 A.D.; obverse AYT K T AIΛ A∆P - ANTWNINOC CEB - EYC, laureate head right; reverse Elpis (hope) walking left, flower in extended right hand, lifting hem of chiton with left hand, L - E (year 5) across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $200.00 (184.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
RS97450. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 541, RSC II 1102, Strack II 121, BMCRE III 136 ff., Hunter II 71, SRCV II 3519, VF, attractive iridescent toning, obv. well centered, flow lines, rev. a little off center, some die wear, marks, scattered light porosity, weight 2.871 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late 121 - 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, helmeted and draped, right breast bare, right foot drawn back and resting on helmet, Victory in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, round shield on ground behind cuirass; ex Trusted Coins; $175.00 (161.00)


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||denarius|NEW
Lucifer means lightbringer, from the Latin lux light and ferre to bear or bring. The word Lucifer is found in only one place in the Bible -- Isaiah 14:12 -- but only in the King James and related versions: How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! The King James Version is based on the Vulgate, the Latin translation of Jerome. Jerome translated the Hebrew helel (bright or brilliant one) as lucifer, which was a reasonable Latin equivalent. And yet it is this lucifer, the bright one or lightbearer, that came to be understood by so many as the name for Satan, Lord of Darkness.
RS96571. Silver denarius, RIC III MA762; RSC II 14; BMCRE IV p. 427, 310; Hunter II p. 388, 2; SRCV II 5482 var. (Diana standing right), Choice aVF, well centered, toned, radiating flow lines, a few scratches, edge a little ragged with edge cracks, weight 3.563 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right, hair waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing slightly left, head left, long torch transverse left held in both hands; $165.00 (151.80)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
This type, depicting Nemesis, the avenger of crimes and punisher of wicked doers, likely refers to the final subjugation of the Bar Kochba rebellion which was brutally crushed in the summer of 135 A.D.
RS94594. Silver denarius, RIC II-3 2239, RIC II 282(d), RSC II 1455, BMCRE III 761, Hunter II 254, Strack II 280, SRCV II 3547 var. (bare head), VF, well centered on a tight flan, dark spots, earthen deposits, weight 2.822 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 136 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory-Nemesis walking right, drawing out fold of drapery at neck with right hand, branch in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $160.00 (147.20)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.||sestertius|
Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain. This reverse suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces (especially from Africa) and its distribution to the people.
RB96498. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 891, BMCRE IV 1891, Hunter II 292, SRCV II 4148, Cohen II 50, Choice F, porosity, small die break reverse exergue left side, weight 22.430 g, maximum diameter 31.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 151 - 152 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XV COS IIII, Annona seated left, stalks of grain pointed downward in her right hand, cornucopia in left hand, modius with poppy and grain at feet left, S - C (senatus consulto) across field, ANNONA AVG in exergue; $150.00 (138.00)




  







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