Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Twelve Caesars| ▸ |Caligula||View Options:  |  |  | 

Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.

Caius Caesar was born in 12 A.D., the son of Germanicus and Agrippina Sr. He was nicknamed Caligula, meaning "little boots," by the legions because as a child his mother dressed him in military uniforms (including little boots). Initially, he was very popular, succeeding Tiberius in 37 A.D. and for a few brief months ruling very well. However, an unknown disease drove him mad and his reign soon degenerated into debauchery and murder. He was murdered by the Praetorian Guard in 41 A.D.


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Divus Augustus Reverse

Click for a larger photo
Tiberius left his estate and the titles of the principate to Caligula and to Tiberius' own grandson, Gemellus, who were to serve as joint heirs. Although Tiberius was 78 and on his death bed, some ancient historians still conjecture that he was murdered. Tacitus writes that the Praetorian Prefect, Macro, smothered Tiberius with a pillow to hasten Caligula's accession, much to the joy of the Roman people. Suetonius writes that Caligula may have carried out the murder himself, though this is not recorded by any other ancient historian. Seneca the elder and Philo, as well as Josephus, record that Tiberius died a natural death. Caligula had Tiberius' will nullified with regards to Gemellus on grounds of insanity, but otherwise he carried out Tiberius' wishes.
SL88182. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RIC I 2, RSC I 11, Lyon 157, BnF II 3, BMCRE I 4, SRCV I 1808 (official, silver, Lugdunum, 37 A.D.), NGC VF, strike 4/5, surface 1/5, core visible (2490386-001), weight 3.336 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 315o, unofficial counterfeiter's mint, 37 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT COS, bare head of Caligula right; reverse radiate head of Divus Augustus right, flanked by two stars; rare; $380.00 (€334.40)
 


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Kidramos, Caria

Click for a larger photo
Cidramus or Kidramos, also known as Kidrama, was between Sebastopolis and Cibyra in southern Caria. Its site, occupied until Byzantine times, is located near modern Yorga, Turkey.
RP93055. Bronze assarion, RPC I 2874, SNG Cop 193, SNGvA 2585, McClean 8469, Imhoof-Blumer KM p. 139, 1 & taf. V, 14 (all known specimens from the same dies), VF, dark patina, some porosity, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 4.702 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kidramos (near Yorga, Turkey) mint, magistrate Mousaios Kallikratous Pr., 37 - 41 A.D.; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head of Gaius (Caligula) left; reverse KI∆PAMHNΩN MOYΣAIOΣ KAΛΛIKPATOYΣ ΠP, Goddess (Sparzene?, mother of the gods) standing facing, with outstretched arms; this is the first coin from Kidramos handled by Forum; very rare; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Philadelphia, Lydia

Click for a larger photo
At least 15 different magistrates are named on the coins of Philadelphia, Lydia during the four-year reign of Caligula. They were probably members of a board. The individuals describe themselves variously as priest of Germanicus, Olympic victor, philopatris, grammateus, and in a number of cases philokaisar. The magistrate named on this coin, Attalikos, identifies himself as philokaisar (friend of Caesar) on a larger denomination.
RP88186. Bronze AE 15, RPC I 3026 (3 specimens); Imhoof-Blumer LS p. 118, 20, aF, well centered, porous, light earthen deposits, weight 3.147 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 90o, Lydia, Philadelphia (Alasehir, Turkey) mint, magistrate Attalikos, 16 Mar 37 - 24 Jan 41 A.D.; obverse ΓAIOC KAICAP, bare head right, lituus below chin; reverse winged thunderbolt right, ΦIΛA/∆EΛΦEWN in two lines above, ATTAΛI/KOC in two lines below; very rare; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


Kingdom of Thrace, Rhoemetalces III, c. 38 - 46 A.D., Caligula Reverse

Click for a larger photo
Rhoemetalces III was the son of the King Rhescuporis II. He ruled the Odrysian kingdom of Thrace with his cousin-wife Pythodoris II as clients under the Romans from 38 to 46 A.D. They succeeded Pythodoris’ mother Tryphaena and her brother Rhoemetalces II. Rhoemetalces III was murdered in 46, by insurgents or on the orders of his wife. The subsequent fate of Pythodoris II is unknown and it seems they didn't have any children. Soon after his death, Thrace was incorporated into the Roman Empire as a province.
RP91897. Bronze AE 26, RPC I 1724; Youroukova 210; BMC Thrace p. 210, 2; SNG Cop -, aF, corrosion, weight 8.998 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Thracian mint, 38 - 41 B.C.; obverse BAΣIΛEYΣ POIMHTAΛKAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Rhoemetalkes right; reverse ΓAIΩ KAIΣAPI ΣEBAΣTΩ, laureate head of Caligula left; very rare; $60.00 (€52.80)
 







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CCAESARAVGPONMTRPOTIII
CCAESARAVGGERMANICVS
CCAESARAVGGERMANICVSPONMTRPOT
CCAESARAVGGERMPMTRPOT
CCAESARDIVIAVGPRONAVGPMTRPIIII
CCAESARDIVIAVGPRONAVGSC
CCAESARAVGPONMTRPOTIIICOSIII
CCAESARAVGGERMPMTRPOT


REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society (ANS) Collections Database Online - http://numismatics.org/search/search
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripollès. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 & suppl.).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. One: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. I: De Pompeyo Magno a Matidia (Del 81 a.C. al 117 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Giard, J-B. "Les emissions d'or et d'argent de Caligula dans l'atelier de Lyon" in RN 18 (1976), pp. 69-81.
Giard, J-B. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, des origines au règne de Caligula (43 avant J.-C. - 41 après J.-C.). (Wetteren, 1983).
Giard, J-B. Monnaies de L'Empire Romain II: De Tebère à Néron. Catalogue Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Paris, 1988).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol 1: Augustus to Vitellius. (London, 1923).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Vol. One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sutherland, C. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. I, From 39 BC to AD 69. (London, 1984).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Sunday, October 20, 2019.
Page created in 0.907 seconds.
Roman Coins of Caligula