Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 4 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Books Clearance Sale Now - Many at or Below Our Wholesale Cost!!! Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities 10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 4 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Syria| ▸ |Other Syria||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Other Syrian, Cities
Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
At the age of eighteen, Antiochus III inherited a disorganized state. Much of Anatolia had been lost and the easternmost provinces had revolted and broken away. After some initial defeats, Antiochus took Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt and then conquered Anatolia, earning him the epithet "the Great." In 192 B.C. Antiochus invaded Greece with a 10,000-man army, and was elected the commander in chief of the Aetolian League. In 191 B.C., however, the Romans routed him at Thermopylae, forcing him to withdraw to Anatolia. The Romans followed up by invading Anatolia and defeating him again. By the Treaty of Apamea 188 B.C., Antiochus abandoned all territory north and west of the Taurus, most of which the Roman Republic gave either to Rhodes or to the Attalid ruler Eumenes II, its allies. Many Greek cities were left free. As a consequence of this blow to the Seleucid power, the provinces which had recovered by Antiochus, reasserted their independence. Antiochus mounted a fresh eastern expedition. He died while pillaging a temple of Bel at Elymas, Persia, in 187 B.C.
GY99759. Silver tetradrachm, Newell ESM 396 (A4/P16), SNG Spaer 727 (same dies), Houghton-Lorber I 1121.2c, HGC 9 447bb, gVF, excellent portrait, light marks, weight 17.001 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, "rose" (Edessa?) mint, 213 - 187 B.C.; obverse Antiochos diademed head right, dotted border; reverse Apollo naked seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on bow grounded behind, cornucopia outer left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANT-IOXOY downward on left, rose (control) outer left, AT monogram outer right; $650.00 SALE PRICE $585.00


Syrian Civic Issues and Seleukid Kingdom, 44 Bronze Coins, c. 300 - 100 B.C.

|Greek| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Syrian| |Civic| |Issues| |and| |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |44| |Bronze| |Coins,| |c.| |300| |-| |100| |B.C.||Lot|
The following list was provided by the consignor types, grades and rarity have not been verified by FORVM:
1) Seleukeia, Syria, AE21 Cop 392, VF.
2) Seleukos I, Medusa/ bull butting, Newell 924, VF, cleaned.
3) Seleukos I, AE18, Athena/ Zeus stg, F.
4) Phoenicia, Tyre, 1st century B.C., 20 mm., year 90 (37/6 B.C.), Melqart/ club, RPC I 4707, VF, cleaned.
5) Marathos, AE20, Berenike II/ Marathos standing, elbow on column, F, cleaned, ex Surber collection.
6) Chalkis, Ptolemaios, AE19, Chalkis sub Libano, 73-72 B.C., Zeus/ Castor and Pollux, Seleukid year 240, SNG Cop 413, F.
7) Antioch, AE17, c. 120-130 A.D., Asklepios/ serpent entwined staff, Butcher 12, F.
8) Sidon, AE18, Tyche/ Astarte on prow, cf. BMC 128, VF.
9) Apamea, Syria, AE22, Dionysos/ veiled Tyche, c. 30-29 B.C., cf. RPC I 4347, F, two c/m of Tyche, ex J.S. Wagner.
10) Seleukos I, AE20 Antioch on the Orontes, Medusa right/ bull, F.
11) Antiochos I, AE15, Facing Athena/ Nike, aF.
12) Antioch, Ram and crescent, RPC 4287, Fair.
13) Sidon, Year 102 (2/3 AD), Altar before temple, RPC 4568, aF.
14) Seleukos I, AE21 Elephant/ horse head, anchor countermark, SNG Israel 50-52, aF, rough but rare.
15) Antiochos III the Great. 222-187 BC. AE27 (7.46g) Antioch, head of Antiochos III/ Apollo seated on omphalos, SNG Spaer 561, F, thin oval flan.
16-44) 29 additional Seleucid and Syrian bronzes, average F.
LT96235. Bronze Lot, Syrian civic issues and Seleukid Kingdom, average F, c. 300 - 100 B.C.; no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photograph, as-is, no returns, 44 coins; $400.00 SALE PRICE $360.00 ON RESERVE


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - late May 238 A.D., Philadelphia, Cilicia Trachea

|Cilicia|, |Maximinus| |I| |Thrax,| |20| |March| |235| |-| |late| |May| |238| |A.D.,| |Philadelphia,| |Cilicia| |Trachea||AE| |34|
Philadelphia (Greek: brotherly love) in ancient Cilicia Trachea (later of Isauria) was on the river Calycadnus, above Aphrodisias. Its site is tentatively located near Imsi ren in Asiatic Turkey. Neither Philadelphia in Lydia (Alasehir, Turkey today) nor Philadelphia, in the Decapolis, later Arabia Petraea (Amman, Jordan today) struck coins for Maximinus Thrax.
RB98739. Bronze AE 34, SNG BnF 760, SNG Levante 580, SNGvA 5804, SNG Leypold 2580, Lindgren-Kovacs 786, RPC Online VI T6889, EF, dark patina, pitting, a little off center, weight 14.930 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cilicia, Philadelphia (near Imsi ren, Turkey) mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ IOVH MAΞIMEINOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ΦILALELFFEΩN KHTIΛOC, Tyche standing left, kalathos on head, grounded rudder in right hand held by tiller, cornucopia in left hand; from the CEB Collection, ex Edward J. Waddell, big 34mm!; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|NEW
"CA" on the reverse has been interpreted several ways, including Caesaris Auctoritate, Commune Asia, and Caesar Augustus. RPC notes the mint and the date are uncertain. The mint was certainly in Syria, where nearly all examples have been found. Antioch is most likely, as the type shares a countermark, otherwise only found on Antioch S C bronzes.
RP99932. Bronze as, McAlee 194(b) (scarce), RPC Online I 4103 (28 spec.), BMCRE I 712, AMC I 693, Grant FITA , F, nice portrait but flatly struck, uneven strike with weak area on reverse, weight 8.677 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Syrian "CA" mint, 16 Jan 27 - 5 B.C.; obverse bare head right, no legend, linear border; reverse CA within a laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves, the wreath between an inner and outer linear border; scarce; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00 ON RESERVE


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Antiocheia ad Hippum, Decapolis, Syria Palestina

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia| |ad| |Hippum,| |Decapolis,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |23|
Hippos is an archaeological site located on a hill overlooking the Sea of Galilee in the Mt. Sussita National Park, Israel. Between the 3rd century B.C. and the 7th century A.D., Hippos was the site of a Greco-Roman city, which declined under Muslim rule and was abandoned after an earthquake in 749. Besides the fortified city itself, Hippos controlled two port facilities on the lake and an area of the surrounding countryside. Hippos was part of the Decapolis, or Ten Cities, a region in Roman Jordan, Syria and Israel that were culturally tied more closely to Greece and Rome than to the Semitic ethnoi around.
RY99699. Bronze AE 23, RPC IV.3 T6574 (6 spec.), Spijkerman 17, Sofaer 19, SNG ANS 1142 var. (bust, dated), VF, dark green patina, scratches, a little rough, light earthen deposits, weight 8.594 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Hippos (Mt. Sussita National Park) mint, 7 Mar 161 - Feb 169 A.D.; obverse AYT KAICAP Λ AYP OYHPOC, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse ANT ΠP IΠ IEP ACYΛ, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, small horse in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |21|
Samosata, meaning "sun," was an ancient city whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the Atatrk Dam. -- wikipedia.org
RP99004. Bronze AE 21, RPC III 3419; SNG Hunt 2590; SNG Munchen 376; SNG Cop Cyprus 17; Butcher p. 470, 12; BMC Galatia p. 118, 22, gVF, dark patina, uneven strike with flat areas, part of edge ragged, light earthen deposits, weight 5.450 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatrk Dam) mint, c. 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear; reverse ΦΛA / CAMO / MHTPO / KOM (Flavia Samosata Metropolis Commagene), inscription in four lines within oak wreath; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Apameia, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 71 - 70 B.C.

|Other| |Syria|, |Apameia,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |71| |-| |70| |B.C.||AE| |23|NEW
In 302 B.C., Seleucus ceded a large part of Afghanistan to Chandragupta for 500 elephants to equip his army. The Seleukids' elephant and horse breeding and training camp was at Apamea. More than thirty thousand brood mares and three hundred stallions were kept. Here instructors taught the methods of fighting in heavy armor, and all the arts of war. In 188 B.C., Rome forced the defeated Antiochus III to sign the Treaty of Apamea, which obligated him to hand over all but 10 of his ships, hostages, 15,000 talents and all his elephants. When this coin was issued, the elephants had long existed only in memory.
GY110201. Bronze AE 23, HGC 9 1419; Cohen DCA 410 (scarce); cf. BMC Galatia, p. 233, 5 (year 243); SNG Munchen 792 (same); Hunter III p. 190, 2 (same); SNG Cop -, aVF, blue-green patina, earthen deposits, oval flan, flan adjustment marks on rev., weight 9.716 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 71 - 70 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Zeus right; reverse elephant walking right, AΠAMEΩN / THΣ IEPAΣ in two lines above, KAI AΣYΛOY over ∆I (control letters) below, BMΣ (year 242 of Seleukid era) under trunk; scarcer year; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Gabala, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Gabala,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |24|
Gabula was important enough in the Roman province of Syria Prima to be a Metropolitan Archdiocese in the sway of the Patriarchate of Antioch (the provincial capital Antioch on the Orontes), but was to fade, presumably at the advent of Islam.
RY92570. Bronze AE 24, SNG Cop 316; SNG Hunterian II 3244; Lindgren III 1192; SNG Munchen 835; BMC Galatia p. 246, 20 var. (laureate head), VF, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off much of legends, porous, weight 8.847 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 15o, Gabala (Jableh, Syria) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse AV K M O C MAKPEINOC CE, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΓABAΛEWN, Tyche seated left, wearing chiton, peplos and modius, rudder held by tiller on right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Syria|, |Geta,| |209| |-| |c.| |26| |December| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |24|
At the end of the narrow gorge, the Siq, stands Petra's most elaborate ruin, popularly known as Al-Khazneh ("the Treasury"), hewn into the sandstone cliff. While remaining in remarkably preserved condition, the face of the structure is marked by hundreds of bullet holes made by the local Bedouin tribes that hoped to dislodge riches that were once rumored to be hidden within it. A little farther from the Treasury, at the foot of the mountain called en-Nejr, is a massive theater, positioned so as to bring the greatest number of tombs within view. At the point where the valley opens out into the plain, the site of the city is revealed with striking effect. The theater was cut into the hillside and into several of the tombs during its construction. Rectangular gaps in the seating are still visible. Almost enclosing it on three sides are rose-colored mountain walls, divided into groups by deep fissures and lined with knobs cut from the rock in the form of towers.Theater
RY94892. Bronze AE 24, cf. Spijkerman 49b, Rosenberger 32, SNG ANS -, BMC Arabia -, Sofaer -, Meshorer City Coins -, F, earthen patina, legends weak, weight 9.810 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, as caesar, 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse Π CEΠT ΓETAC KAICAP (or similar, from upper right), bare-headed young, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHTPOΠ, Tyche seated left on rocks, extended right hand (holding stele?), trophy over left shoulder in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Baramki, D. The Coin Collection of the American University of Beirut Museum. (Beirut, 1974).
Bellinger, A. The Excavations at Dura-Europos, Final Report, Vol. 6: The Coins. (New Haven, 1949).
Bellinger, A. The Syrian Tetradrachms of Caracalla and Macrinus. ANSNS 3. (New York, 1940).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Butcher, K. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC-AD 253. (London, 2004).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
de Callata, F. "Le production des ttradrachmes civiques de la Cilicie jusqu? la Palestine" in Les Monnayages Syriens.
Gardner, P. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, The Seleucid Kings of Syria. (Forni reprint, 1963).
Houghton, A., C. Lorber, & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002-2008).
Houghton, A. Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton. ACNAC 4. (New York, 1983).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Syrian Coins, Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC. HGC 9. (Lancaster, PA, 2009).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Lydische Stadtmnzen, neue Untersuchungen. (Geneva/Leipzig, 1897). Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, 2007).
McAlee, R. "Severan Tetradrachms of Laodicea" in ANSMN 29 (1984).
Meyer, E. "Die Bronzeprgung von Laodikeia in Syrien 194 - 217" in JNG XXXVII/XXXVIII (1987/8), pp. 57 - 92, taf. 7 - 18.
Mrkholm, O. "Autonomous Tetradrachms of Laodicea" in ANSMN 28 (New York, 1983).
Newell, E. Late Seleucid Mints in Ake-Ptolemais and Damascus. ANSNNM 84 (New York, 1939).
Newell, E. The Coinage of the Western Seleucid Mints, From Seleucus I to Antiochus III. (New York, 1941).
Newell, E. The Seleucid Mint of Antioch. (Chicago, 1978).
Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Prieur, M. & K. Prieur. The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their fractions from 57 BC to AD 258. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part 28: Syrien: Nicht-knigliche Prgungen. (Berlin, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 8: Syria-Nabataea. (London, 1971).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus-Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Israel I, The Arnold Spaer Collection of Seleucid Coins. (London, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia. (1986 & suppl.).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Van Heesch, J. "The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza (AD 312)" in NC 1993.
Waage, D. Antioch-on-the-Orontes, Vol. 4, Part 2: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders' Coins. (Princeton, 1952).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).
Wruck, W. Die Syrische Provinzialprgung von Augustus bis Traian. (Stuttgart, 1931).

Catalog current as of Monday, October 3, 2022.
Page created in 1.063 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity