Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 or 252-497-2724 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Syria||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Syria
Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Otho,| |15| |January| |69| |-| |17| |April| |69| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
Gaius Licinius Mucianus (named on this coin) was governor of Syria. When he failed to put down the Jewish revolt, Vespasian was sent to replace him. After the death of Galba, Mucianus and Vespasian both swore allegiance to Otho. Mucianus persuaded Vespasian to take up arms against Vitellius, who had seized the throne. They agreed Vespasian would settle affairs in the East, while Mucianus made would attack Vitellius. On his way to Rome, Mucianus defeated a Dacian invasion of Moesia. Mucianus reached Rome the day after Vitellius' death. Mucianus never wavered in his allegiance to Vespasian and was appointed consul for the third time in 72. As no mention is made of Mucianus during the reigns of Titus or Domitian, he probably died during the reign of Vespasian.
RP111018. Bronze as, McAlee 319 (ex. rare, same dies), RPC I 4316 (not specifying leg. direction), Wadd 7260 var. (clockwise legend), SNG Hunt 2854 var. (same), VF, nice portrait, bare metal, scratches, marks, porosity, obv. off center, obv. edge beveled, weight 15.411 g, maximum diameter 29.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 15 Jan 69 - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse IMP M OT-HO - CAE AVG (counterclockwise from upper left), head laureate right, dot in field behind; reverse EΠI / MOYKIA/NOY AN/TIOXEΩ/N ETZIP (legate Mucianus, of Antioch, year 117) in five lines within a linear circle in a laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves, dotted outer border; this variant with a counterclockwise obverse legend is extremely rare; $600.00 (606.00)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Emesa, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Emesa,| |Syria||AE| |23|NEW
Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was the birthplace of the Roman emperor Elagabalus and four Roman empresses, Julia Domna, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea, and Julia Soaemias.
RP111034. Bronze AE 23, Mantis ANSCD 1944.100.66180, SNG Cop -; SNG Munchen -, BMC Galatia -, Lindgren -, VF, near centered, flaw on Caracalla's jaw, weight 11.075 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 216 - 217 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI ANTΩNEINOC CEB, laureate head of Caracalla right; reverse IOVΛIA ΔOMNA CEB, draped bust of Julia Domna right, H-K/Φ ([year] 528) across field; Coin Archives records only two specimens of the type at auction in the last two decades; this is the finest specimen of the four known to FORVM; very rare; $350.00 (353.50)


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - late May 238 A.D., Philadelphia, Cilicia Trachea

|Cilicia|, |Maximinus| |I| |Thrax,| |20| |March| |235| |-| |late| |May| |238| |A.D.,| |Philadelphia,| |Cilicia| |Trachea||AE| |34|
Philadelphia (Greek: brotherly love) in ancient Cilicia Trachea (later of Isauria) was on the river Calycadnus, above Aphrodisias. Its site is tentatively located near Imsi ren in Asiatic Turkey. Neither Philadelphia in Lydia (Alasehir, Turkey today) nor Philadelphia, in the Decapolis, later Arabia Petraea (Amman, Jordan today) struck coins for Maximinus Thrax.
RB98739. Bronze AE 34, SNG BnF 760, SNG Levante 580, SNGvA 5804, SNG Leypold 2580, Lindgren-Kovacs 786, RPC Online VI T6889, EF, dark patina, pitting, a little off center, weight 14.930 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cilicia, Philadelphia (near Imsi ren, Turkey) mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ IOVH MAΞIMEINOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ΦILALELFFEΩN KHTIΛOC, Tyche standing left, kalathos on head, grounded rudder in right hand held by tiller, cornucopia in left hand; from the CEB Collection, ex Edward J. Waddell, big 34mm!; $215.00 (217.15)


Antioch, Roman Provincial Syria, Re-Issue of Philip Philadelphos Coinage, 47 - 16 B.C.

|Roman| |Syria|, |Antioch,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Syria,| |Re-Issue| |of| |Philip| |Philadelphos| |Coinage,| |47| |-| |16| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
In the initial phases of creating a province on the ruins of the Syrian Kingdom, the Romans kept the old monetary system, the coins of this era being almost exact replicas of those of the last Seleukid King Philip Philadelphos.
RY111451. Silver tetradrachm, RPC I 4140 (10 spec.), Prieur 17, McAlee 17, SNG Cop 5830, HGC 9 1360n, BMC Galatia -, F, centered on a tight flan, weight 13.828 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 26 - 25 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Philip Philadelphos right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ in two lines downward on right ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ / ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ in two lines downward on left, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, monogram before legs, KΔ (year 24) in exergue; from the CEB Collection; $150.00 (151.50)


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY110552. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1045b (scarce); Bland Hoards III 576; RPC Online VIII U29067; BMC Galatia p. 218, 559; Prieur 466 var. (only r. pteryx visible); SNG Cop -, Choice gVF, well centered, small spots of corrosion, weight 11.318 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 248 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, both pteryges visible; reverse ΔHMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠA TO Δ (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 4th time), eagle standing left, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, ANTIOXIA over S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; ex R. Basler International Numismatics (Irvine, CA); scarce; $130.00 (131.30)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus XII Dionysos, c. 88 - 84 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |XII| |Dionysos,| |c.| |88| |-| |84| |B.C.||AE| |20|NEW
Antiochus XII was immediately challenged by the Nabataeans whose territories had grown during the Seleucids' perpetual fratricidal wars. While Antiochus was campaigning against the Nabataeans, these wars continued - Philip I took Damascus. Antiochus was forced to return to Damascus and evict his brother. Returning to the Nabataean front again, Antiochus, this time, had to overcome the resistance of Alexander Jannaeus en route. He soon perished in battle at the hands of the Nabataeans, leaving Damascus without a ruler. Damascus, the longtime Southern stronghold of Seleucid power freely gave itself over to the benevolent rule of King Aretas III of Nabataea.
GY110777. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber 2477b, Newell LSM 138, SNG Spaer 2907 var. (monogram), SNG Fitz 5824 var. (monogram), Houghton 870 CSE var. (monogram), VF, well centered, brown-burgundy patina, earthen encrustations, light corrosion, flan casting offset, edge cracks, weight 4.396 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus (Syria) mint, c. 87 - 85 B.C.; obverse diademed and bearded head of Antiochos XII right; reverse Apollo standing slightly left, head left, laurel branch upright in right hand, resting left elbow on tripod, BACIΛEΩC / ANTIOXOY / EΠIΦANOYC in three downward lines right, ΦIΛOΠATOPOC / KAΛΛINIKOY in two downward lines left; monogram outer left; $130.00 (131.30)


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

|Antioch|, |Volusian,| |c.| |November| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.||tetradrachm|
Gaius Vibius Afinius Gallus Vedumnianus Volusian was the son of Trebonianus Gallus and was given the rank of Caesar when his father became emperor. After emperor Hostilian was killed, he was raised to the rank of Augustus. He was assassinated along with his father in 253 A.D.
RY99417. Silver tetradrachm, RPC online IX 1795; McAlee 1187b; Prieur 695 (rare); SNG Hunterian 3125; BMC Galatia p. 230, 658; Dura 614, gVF, toned, tight flan, light corrosion/porosity, weight 10.901 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 1st issue, late 251 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K Γ AΦIN ΓAΛ OYENΔ OYOΛOYCCIANOC CEB, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, (2nd officina) below; reverse ΔHMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing slightly right on line, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, B (2nd officina) between legs, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (121.20)


Trajan Decius, September 249 - June or July 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Trajan| |Decius,| |September| |249| |-| |June| |or| |July| |251| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|
In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RY110642. Billon tetradrachm, RPC Online IX 1708; McAlee 1125(b); Prieur 579; Dura Coins 515; BMC Galatia p. 221, 591; McClean 9414, gVF, centered, excellent portrait, toned, slight porosity, weight 10.854 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse AYT K Γ ME KY TPAIANOC ΔEKIOC CEB (Imperator Caesar Gaius Messius Quintus Traianus Decius Augustus), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right from behind, four pellets below; reverse ΔHMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing right on palm, head right, wings open wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 519 (29 Jun 2022), lot 302; $120.00 (121.20)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.||AE| |12|
David Hendin identifies the mint city as Jerusalem. Some numismatists have attributed this type to Askalon. Houghton and Lorber attribute it to an uncertain mint in southern Koile-Syria.
GY111516. Bronze AE 12, Houghton-Lorber II 2122, SNG Spaer 2095, Houghton CSE 819, Hendin 6166 (Jerusalem mint), HGC 9 1111, VF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, rev. off center, weight 1.108 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 45o, southern Koile-Syria (?, uncertain) mint, 138 - 137 B.C.; obverse crested Boeotian helmet with cheek guards; reverse ANTIOXOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, aphlaston; this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM, ex Zuzim Inc. (Isadore Goldstein, Brooklyn, NY); $120.00 (121.20)


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 13 - 14 A.D., The "Star of Bethlehem Coin"

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |13| |-| |14| |A.D.,| |The| |"Star| |of| |Bethlehem| |Coin"||AE| |20|NEW
Michael Molnar, an astronomer, believes this coin depicts Jupiter's occultation of Aries in 6 B.C., the most probable "Star of Bethlehem."
RY111646. Bronze AE 20, McAlee 96; RPC I 4269; SNG Cop 96; BMC Galatia p. 159, 62; Butcher CRS 56, Choice aVF, attractive green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 7.227 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Legatus Augusti Pro Praetore Silanus, 11 - 12 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse EΠI ΣIΛANOY ANTIOCEΩN, ram running right, looking back, star above, BM (year 42 Actian Era) below; $120.00 (121.20)




  






REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Bellinger, A. The Excavations at Dura-Europos, Final Report, Vol. 6: The Coins. (New Haven, 1949).
Bellinger, A. The Syrian Tetradrachms of Caracalla and Macrinus. ANSNS 3. (New York, 1940).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Butcher, K. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC-AD 253. (London, 2004).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
de Callata, F. "Le production des ttradrachmes civiques de la Cilicie jusqu? la Palestine" in Les Monnayages Syriens.
Gardner, P. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, The Seleucid Kings of Syria. (Forni reprint, 1963).
Houghton, A., C. Lorber, & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002-2008).
Houghton, A. Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton. ACNAC 4. (New York, 1983).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Syrian Coins, Royal and Civic Issues, Fourth to First Centuries BC. HGC 9. (Lancaster, PA, 2009).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, 2007).
McAlee, R. "Severan Tetradrachms of Laodicea" in ANSMN 29 (1984).
Mrkholm, O. "Autonomous Tetradrachms of Laodicea" in ANSMN 28 (New York, 1983).
Newell, E. Late Seleucid Mints in Ake-Ptolemais and Damascus. ANSNNM 84 (New York, 1939).
Newell, E. The Coinage of the Western Seleucid Mints, From Seleucus I to Antiochus III. (New York, 1941).
Newell, E. The Seleucid Mint of Antioch. (Chicago, 1978).
Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Prieur, M. & K. Prieur. The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their fractions from 57 BC to AD 258. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part 28: Syrien: Nicht-knigliche Prgungen. (Berlin, 2001).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 8: Syria-Nabataea. (London, 1971).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus-Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Israel I, The Arnold Spaer Collection of Seleucid Coins. (London, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia. (1986 & suppl.).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Van Heesch, J. "The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza (AD 312)" in NC 1993.
Waage, D. Antioch-on-the-Orontes, Vol. 4, Part 2: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders' Coins. (Princeton, 1952).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).
Wruck, W. Die Syrische Provinzialprgung von Augustus bis Traian. (Stuttgart, 1931).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, March 29, 2023.
Page created in 2.297 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity