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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |S. Lindner Collection||View Options:  |  |  | 

The S. Lindner Byzantine Tetartera Collection

The S. Lindner Collection of Byzantine tetartera is a collection of the small bronze Byzantine denominations from the 11th and 12th centuries, assembled over more than 15 years. Reigns covered include Alexius I, John II, Manuel I, Andronicus, Isaac, Isaac II, and Alexius III. The collection includes many rarely seen coins and all the coins are attractive specimens of types that can be difficult to find well struck and well preserved.

Byzantine Empire, Andronicus I, September 1183 - 12 September 1185 A.D.

|Andronicus| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Andronicus| |I,| |September| |1183| |-| |12| |September| |1185| |A.D.||half| |tetarteron|
Marchev and Watcher suggest the scarcity of this type my be due to limited or no minting during the Norman siege of Thessalonica.
BZ95147. Bronze half tetarteron, CLBC 5.4.4; DOC IV-1 8; SBCV 1989; Hendy pl. 19, 4; Morrisson BnF - (p. 731); Wroth BMC 17-18; Ratto 2172; Sommer 62.6; Grierson 1115, aVF, weak strike, ragged flan with edge splits typical of type, weight 1.781 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, Sep 1183 - 12 Sep 1185 A.D.; obverse facing bust of the Virgin Orans, nimbate, wearing pallium and maphorium, the nimbate head of the infant Christ on her chest, MP - ΘV (Greek abbreviation: MΗTΗP ΘΕOY - Mother of God) across field; reverse ANΔPO, half-length figure of Andronicus facing with forked beard, wearing crown, scaramangion and sagion, labarum in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand; from the S. Lindner Collection; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Byzantine Empire, John II Comnenus, 15 August 1118 - 8 April 1143 A.D.

|John| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |John| |II| |Comnenus,| |15| |August| |1118| |-| |8| |April| |1143| |A.D.||aspron| |trachy|
According to the Golden Legend, a plague-bearing dragon lived in a lake near a city called Silene, in Libya. To appease the dragon, the people fed it two sheep every day. When the sheep failed, they fed it their children, chosen by lottery. It happened that the lot fell on the king's daughter, Sabra. Sabra was sent out to the lake, dressed as a bride, to be fed to the dragon. Saint George was ridding past when dragon reared out of the lake. He fortified himself with the Sign of the Cross charged it on horseback with his lance, and gave it a grievous wound. He then called to the princess to throw him her girdle. After he put it around its neck, the dragon followed the girl like a meek beast on a leash. The princess and Saint George led the dragon back to the city of Silene. It terrified the people at its approach, but Saint George called out to them, saying that if they consented to become Christians and be baptized, he would slay the dragon. The king and the people converted to Christianity and George slew the dragon. On the site where the dragon died, the king built a church to the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint George, and from its altar a spring arose whose waters cured all disease.
SH99294. Electrum aspron trachy, DOC IV-1 8b; Hendy pl. 10, 2; Morrisson BnF 60/Cp/El/02; Wroth BMC 49; CLBC I 3.2.1; Grierson 1067; SBCV 1941; Sommer 60.4; Ratto -, aEF, scyphate, edge split, edge chip, light marks, excellent reverse!, weight 3.949 g, maximum diameter 31.9 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 15 Aug 1118 - 1122 A.D.; obverse Christ seated facing on throne without back, bearded, wearing tunic and kolobion, raising right in benediction, gospels in left hand, IC - XC (Greek abbr.: Ihsos Xrists - Jesus Christ) flanking nimbus, pellet (control) at each side of throne; reverse + Iw / ΔECΠO/TH in column of four rows on left - Θ / ΓE/PW/ΓI in column of four rows on right, John (on left) and St. George standing facing, together holding patriarchal cross on a small globe between them, John wearing crown, divitision, and chlamys with dot (control symbol) below the tablion, St. George nimbate, in military dress, left hand on sword at side; from the S. Lindner Collection; ex Savoca auction 26 (14 Oct 2018), lot 541; scarce; SOLD


Empire of Nicaea, John III Ducas-Vatatzes, c. 15 December 1221 - 3 November 1254

|John| |III|, |Empire| |of| |Nicaea,| |John| |III| |Ducas-Vatatzes,| |c.| |15| |December| |1221| |-| |3| |November| |1254||tetarteron|
John was a very successful ruler who greatly increased the size, influence, and prosperity of the Nicaean Empire. He prepared the way for his descendants to successfully restore Greek rule to Constantinople and to rule the restored Byzantine Empire.
BZ99289. Bronze tetarteron, Lianta 285; DOC IV-2 58; Hendy pl. 34, 4; Wroth BMCV 36; Ratto 2290; Sommer 70.16; SBCV 2116, Nice VF, broad flan, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 2.505 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 150o, Lydia, Magnesia ad Sipylum (Manisa, Turkey) mint, c. 15 Dec 1221 - 3 Nov 1254; obverse bust of St. George facing, nimbate, wearing military attire, spear in right hand, shield on left arm, A in circle left, ΓPw monogram right; reverse Iw / ΔEC/ΠO - OΛOY/K/A/C (or similar, in columns left and right, OY ligate), John standing facing, wearing stemma with pendilia, chlamys, and divitision, labarum in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; from the S. Lindner Collection; rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Andronicus I, September 1183 - 12 September 1185 A.D.

|Andronicus| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Andronicus| |I,| |September| |1183| |-| |12| |September| |1185| |A.D.||half| |tetarteron|
Marchev and Watcher suggest the scarcity of this type my be due to limited or no minting during the Norman siege of Thessalonica.
BZ82686. Bronze half tetarteron, DOC IV-1 8; SBCV 1989; Hendy pl. 19, 4; Morrisson BnF - (p. 731); Wroth BMC 17-18; Ratto 2172; Sommer 62.6; CLBC I 5.4.4; Grierson 1115, aVF, green patina, broad irregular flan, flan splits, some minor corrosion, weight 2.700 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, Sep 1183 - 12 Sep 1185 A.D.; obverse facing bust of the Virgin Orans, nimbate, veiled, wearing pallium and maphorium, the nimbate head of the infant Christ on her chest, MP - ΘV (Greek abbreviation: MΗTΗP ΘΕOY - Mother of God) across field; reverse A-N, half-length figure of Andronicus facing with forked beard, wearing crown, scaramangion and sagion, labarum in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand; from the S. Lindner Collection; rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Alexius III Angelus-Comnenus, 8 April 1195 - 17 July 1203

|Alexius| |III|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Alexius| |III| |Angelus-Comnenus,| |8| |April| |1195| |-| |17| |July| |1203||tetarteron|
According to the Golden Legend, a plague-bearing dragon lived in a lake near a city called Silene, in Libya. To appease the dragon, the people fed it two sheep every day. When the sheep failed, they fed it their children, chosen by lottery. It happened that the lot fell on the king's daughter, Sabra. Sabra was sent out to the lake, dressed as a bride, to be fed to the dragon. Saint George was ridding past when dragon reared out of the lake. He fortified himself with the Sign of the Cross charged it on horseback with his lance, and gave it a grievous wound. He then called to the princess to throw him her girdle. After he put it around its neck, the dragon followed the girl like a meek beast on a leash. The princess and Saint George led the dragon back to the city of Silene. It terrified the people at its approach, but Saint George called out to them, saying that if they consented to become Christians and be baptized, he would slay the dragon. The king and the people converted to Christianity and George slew the dragon. On the site where the dragon died, the king built a church to the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint George, and from its altar a spring arose whose waters cured all disease.
BZ90229. Bronze tetarteron, DOC IV-1 5a; CLBC I 8.4.3; Hendy p. 152 and pl. 23, 9-10; Wroth BMC 39; Grierson 1138; Ratto 2214; SBCV 2015; Sommer 66.6, gVF, well centered on a typical tight flan, porosity, some light corrosion, weight 3.720 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 8 Apr 1195 - 17 Jul 1203; obverse half-length facing bust of St. George, beardless and nimbate, wearing military attire: cuirass and sagion, transverse spear in right hand, left hand resting on hilt of sword, O / ΓE/WP-ΓI/OC (in columns to left and right, WP ligate); reverse AΛEΣIOC - ΔECΠOTHC (or similar), half length figure of Alexius standing facing, wearing crown, divitision, and chlamys, labarum in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; ex S. Lindner Collection; rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Alexius I Comnenus, 4 April 1081 - 15 August 1118 A.D.

|Alexius| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Alexius| |I| |Comnenus,| |4| |April| |1081| |-| |15| |August| |1118| |A.D.||tetarteron|
Although he was not the founder of the Comnenian dynasty, it was during his reign that the Comnenus family came to full power. Inheriting a collapsing empire and faced with constant warfare during his reign against both the Seljuq Turks in Asia Minor and the Normans in the western Balkans, Alexius was able to curb the Byzantine decline and begin the military, financial, and territorial recovery known as the Comnenian restoration.
BZ95146. Bronze tetarteron, CLBC 2.4.1; DOC IV-1 33; Grierson 1042; Hendy pl. 7, 10-11; SBCV 1920; Sommer 59.19, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, reverse right struck a little weak, weight 4.382 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople mint, 1092 - 1093 A.D.; obverse bust of Christ facing, cross behind head, wearing pallium and kolobion, blesses with right hand, book of Gospels in left hand, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Ihsos Xrists - Jesus Christ) flanking across field; reverse + AΛE / ZIW ΔEC (or similar), Alexius bust facing, wearing crown and loros, jeweled (5 globules) scepter in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; from the S. Lindner Collection; scarce; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Isaac Comnenus, Usurper in Cyprus, 1184 - 1191 A.D.

|Isaac| |Comnenus| |of| |Cyprus|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Isaac| |Comnenus,| |Usurper| |in| |Cyprus,| |1184| |-| |1191| |A.D.||tetarteron|
Isaac Comnenus maintained independent rule in Cyprus for 7 years. He was defeated by Richard the Lionheart of England during the third crusade. Isaac was imprisoned and Cyprus was never recovered by the empire.
SL95154. Bronze tetarteron, CLBC I 6.3.6 B (R4); Hendy pl., 21, 13; SBCV 1998 (extremely rare); Morrisson BnF 63/Ch(B)03; Wroth BMC -; Ratto -, NGC VF, strike 3/5, surface 2/5 (5770405-006), weight 2.940 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Cyprus mint, 1184 - 1191 A.D.; obverse O EMMA-NOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: "God with us"), Christ enthroned facing, bearded, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, raising right hand in benediction, scroll in left hand, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Ihsos Xrists - Jesus Christ) flanking nimbus; reverse ICAAKIOC ΔECΠOTIC (or similar, Isaac, despot), Isaac (on left) standing facing, crowned by the Virgin (on right), emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar-piece and simplified jeweled, cruciform scepter in left hand, akakia in right hand, Virgin nimbate, wearing tunic and maphorion, Greek MHTP monogram (Mother) above center; from the S. Lindner Collection; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Alexius III Angelus-Comnenus, 8 April 1195 - 17 July 1203

|Alexius| |III|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Alexius| |III| |Angelus-Comnenus,| |8| |April| |1195| |-| |17| |July| |1203||tetarteron|
According to the Golden Legend, a plague-bearing dragon lived in a lake near a city called Silene, in Libya. To appease the dragon, the people fed it two sheep every day. When the sheep failed, they fed it their children, chosen by lottery. It happened that the lot fell on the king's daughter, Sabra. Sabra was sent out to the lake, dressed as a bride, to be fed to the dragon. Saint George was ridding past when dragon reared out of the lake. He fortified himself with the Sign of the Cross charged it on horseback with his lance, and gave it a grievous wound. He then called to the princess to throw him her girdle. After he put it around its neck, the dragon followed the girl like a meek beast on a leash. The princess and Saint George led the dragon back to the city of Silene. It terrified the people at its approach, but Saint George called out to them, saying that if they consented to become Christians and be baptized, he would slay the dragon. The king and the people converted to Christianity and George slew the dragon. On the site where the dragon died, the king built a church to the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint George, and from its altar a spring arose whose waters cured all disease.
BZ99288. Bronze tetarteron, DOC IV-1 5a.2; CLBC I 8.4.3; Morrison BnF 1; Hendy p. 152 & pl. 23, 9; Wroth BMC 39; Grierson 1138; Ratto 2214; SBCV 2015; Sommer 66.6, F, near black patina, tight square flan, some corrosion, weight 4.411 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 8 Apr 1195 - 17 Jul 1203; obverse half-length facing bust of St. George, beardless and nimbate, wearing military attire: cuirass and sagion, transverse spear in right hand, left hand resting on hilt of sword, O / ΓE/WP-ΓI/OC (in columns in left and right fields); reverse AΛEΣIOC - ΔECΠOTHC (or similar), half length figure of Alexius standing facing, wearing crown, divitision, and chlamys, labarum in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; from the S. Lindner Collection; rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Manuel I Comnenus, 8 April 1143 - 24 September 1180 A.D.

|Manuel| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Manuel| |I| |Comnenus,| |8| |April| |1143| |-| |24| |September| |1180| |A.D.||half| |tetarteron|
The cruciform monogram should probably be read, MΛ (Manuel) Δ (Despotes) K (Komnenos) Π (Porphyrogennetos).

Gibbons Decline & Fall says of Manuel I, "The first in the charge, the last in the retreat, his friends and his enemies alike trembled, the former for his safety, and the latter for their own."
BZ91215. Bronze half tetarteron, DOC IV-1 22; Hendy pl. 18, 1; Morrisson BnF 61/X/AE/1; Wroth BMC 79; Ratto 2159; SBCV 1979; Sommer 61.24.1, gVF, dark near black patina, overstruck on clipped coin, obverse slightly off center, small edge cracks, weight 1.867 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Greek mint, 8 Apr 1143 - 1152 A.D.; obverse cruciform Manuel monogram ; reverse half-length bust of Manuel facing, beardless, wearing stemma, divitision, collar decorated with six jewels, loros and crown with cross and pendilia, labarum in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; from the S. Lindner Collection, ex Forum (2016); SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Manuel I Comnenus, 8 April 1143 - 24 September 1180 A.D.

|Manuel| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Manuel| |I| |Comnenus,| |8| |April| |1143| |-| |24| |September| |1180| |A.D.||tetarteron|
Gibbons Decline & Fall says of Manuel I, "The first in the charge, the last in the retreat, his friends and his enemies alike trembled, the former for his safety, and the latter for their own." Wroth is the only reference that identifies the Manuel side as the obverse. For this example, Wroth appears to be correct.
BZ95155. Bronze tetarteron, DOC IV-1 16; CLBC 4.4.3; Hendy p. 120 & pl. 17, 10; Wroth BMC 62; SBCV 1969; Grierson 1095; Morrison BnF 61/Cp/AE/30; Sommer 61.14; Ratto -, F, uneven strike, obverse off center, porosity/corrosion, weight 3.595 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1152 - 1160 A.D.; obverse Christ standing facing on dias, bearded, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, colobium, raising right hand in benediction, Gospels in left hand, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Ihsos Xrists - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse MANVHΛ ΔECΠOTH (Manuel, despot), emperor standing facing, wearing crown, divitision and chlamys, labarum with X on shaft in right, globus cruciger in left; from the S. Lindner Collection, this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Bellinger, A. Catalogue of the Byzantine Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and in the Whittemore Collection, Vol. IV, Part 1: Alexius I to Alexius V (1081-1204). (Washington D.C., 1966).
Grierson, P. Byzantine Coins. (London, 1982).
Hendy, M. Coinage and Money in the Byzantine Empire 1081-1261. (Washington D.C., 1969).
Marchev, V. & R. Wachter. Catalogue of the Late Byzantine Coins, Vol. I, 1082 - 1261 AD. (Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria, 2011).
Morrisson, C. Catalogue des Monnaies Byzantines de la Bibliothque Nationale II, 711 - 1204. (Paris, 1970).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines l'poque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Sabatier, J. Description gnrale des monnaies Byzantines. (Paris, 1863).
Sear, D. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. (London, 1987).
Sommer, A. Die Mnzen des Byzantinischen Reiches 491-1453. Mit einem Anhang: Die Mnzen des Kaiserreichs von Trapezunt. (Regenstauf, 2010).
Tolstoi, I. Monnaies byzantines. (St. Petersburg, 1913 - 14).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Imperial Byzantine Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1908).

Catalog current as of Friday, September 29, 2023.
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