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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |Errett Bishop Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Errett Bishop Collection

Errett Albert Bishop (July 14, 1928 - April 14, 1983) was an American mathematician known for his work on analysis and a professor at the University of California at San Diego. He expanded constructive analysis in his 1967 Foundations of Constructive Analysis, where he proved most of the important theorems in real analysis by constructive methods. (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errett_Bishop).

He was also a great father and a fun-loving guy who would take his family biking, surfing, snorkeling, camping, etc. He enjoyed going to auctions, where he would often pick up an interesting artifact or a piece of art. Errett's son, Edward, in the photograph with his father on the right, describes his childhood home as half junk-yard, half museum. Errett especially loved ancient coins, and he was one of the founding members of the Ancient Coin Club in San Diego.

The Errett Bishop Collection includes over 1000 Ancient Greek, Roman Republic, Roman imperial, Roman provincial, Celtic, Judaean, Byzantine and other ancient coins collected from about 1960 to 1982. The collection includes 136 coins from Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. The variety of types and the range from inexpensive to beautiful showcase coins means there are coins in this collection for almost every collection and every budget. Due to the size of the collection, it will be some time before they are all added to the shop. Keep looking here or in our recent additions to see them as we add them.

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Apollonia Salbace, Caria

|Other| |Caria|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Apollonia| |Salbace,| |Caria||AE| |30|
This coin is an obverse die match to a coin struck by the neighboring city, Alabanda, Caria, SNG Mnchen 464, RPC Online VI T5384. Dies shared by more than one city in the region were first discovered by Konrad Kraft in 1972. Groups of smaller cities in Anatolia shared traveling mints, which would sometimes use the same obverse dies for more than one city.
RP92646. Bronze AE 30, Apparently unpublished; RPC Online -, SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, BMC Caria -, F, porous, turquoise and earthen adhesions, reverse flatly struck, weight 11.787 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 180o, Apollonia Salbace (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYP CEY AΛEΞAN∆PO-C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CTPA AΓAΘEINOY TOY IH AΠOΛΛΩNIATΩN (strategos Agathinos, son of Hie.(?), Apollonia), Zeus standing slightly left, head left, wearing himation and chlamys, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; extremely rare, this is the only specimen of the type known to FORVM; $225.00 (234.00)


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

|Macrinus|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.||sestertius|
Macrinus was praetorian prefect for Caracalla but arranged Caracalla's assassination and seized power. He and his son were accepted by the senate. The Syrian legions, inspired by Julia Maesa, Caracalla's aunt, revolted after he concluded an unfavorable peace with the Persians. He was defeated and executed.
SL92493. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 121 (S), BMCRE V 113, Cohen IV 79, SRCV II 7391, Hunter III -, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 1/5, scratches (577028-007), weight 19.150 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 11 Apr 217 - 31 Dec 217 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PONTIF MAX TR P P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power, father of the country), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, drapery over left arm, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; NGC| Lookup; $200.00 (208.00)


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

|Heraclius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Heraclius| |and| |Heraclius| |Constantine,| |23| |January| |613| |-| |11| |January| |641| |A.D.||decanummium|
Heraclius offered peace to Khusro, presumably in 624, threatening otherwise to invade Persia, but Khusro rejected the offer. Heraclius marched into Persia with an army of probably less than 25,000 men, willingly abandoning any attempt to secure his rear or maintain lines of communication. Heraclius fought brilliantly and bravely repeatedly defeated the Persian forces. When the war ended in 628, Khusro had been murdered by his own men, the Byzantines regained all their lost territories, their captured soldiers, a war indemnity, and most importantly for them, the True Cross and other relics that were lost in Jerusalem in 614.
BZ93528. Bronze decanummium, Anastasi 61, DOC II-1 256 (not in collection), Ricotti 32 bis, Sommer 11.117, SBCV 886, Hahn MIB 241, Wroth -, Morrisson BnF -, Ratto -, Tolstoi -, VF, nicely centered reverse, green patina, weight 3.494 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sicily, Catania mint, 624 - 625 A.D.; obverse facing busts of Heraclius on left, bearded, and Heraclius Constantine on right, beardless; both crowned, draped and cuirassed; cross between their heads; reverse large I (10 nummi), A/N/N/O (year) in column left, X/V (15) in two lines right, CAT in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $140.00 (145.60)


Parthian Empire, Vologases VI, 208 - 228 A.D.

|Parthian| |Empire|, |Parthian| |Empire,| |Vologases| |VI,| |208| |-| |228| |A.D.||drachm|
Soon after Vologases VI succeeded his father to the throne, his brother Artabanus V rebelled against him and became master of the greater part of the empire. Vologases VI retained a part of Babylonia. Meanwhile, in 224, Ardashir I, the founder of the Sassanid Empire, defeated and killed Artabanus V and conquered the eastern provinces. Over the following years, Ardashir I expanded his new empire, and must have defeated Vologases VI in 228 or 229.
GS96048. Silver drachm, Sellwood 88.18; Shore 455; BMC Parthia p. 243, 20 (Vologases V); Sunrise 459 var. (monogram variant); SNG Cop 246 var. (same, Vologases V), gVF, toned, flow lines, off center, weight 2.983 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Ecbatana (Hamedan, Iran) mint, 208 - 228 A.D.; obverse bust left with long pointed beard extending past beaded border, wearing tiara with ear flaps, crest of dotted lines, dotted lines to left of line down side, abbreviated king's name in Aramaic lↄ (wz = Wlgy= Vologases) upper right; reverse archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, bow in extended right hand, cross under legs, (Ecbatana control monogram) below bow, squared five-line legend around, Aramaic Wlgy MLK' (King Vologases) at the top, the other four lines blundered Greek; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 (124.80)


Sasanian Empire, Khusro II, Occupation of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D.

|Sasanian| |Empire|, |Sasanian| |Empire,| |Khusro| |II,| |Occupation| |of| |Egypt,| |618| |-| |628| |A.D.||12| |nummi|NEW
During his temporary domination of Egypt, 618 - 628 A.D., Khusru allowed the Alexandria mint to continue issuing the normal Byzantine coinage, but substituted his portrait for the Byzantine emperor's. The sun and moon replaced the obverse legend, just as on contemporary Sasanian coinage. It may seem strange that a Persian king would wear a crown surmounted by a cross; however, his wife Sira was a Christian, he was a benefactor of the church of St. Sergius in Edessa, he honored the Virgin, and he sometimes wore a robe embroidered with a cross which he had received as a gift from the Emperor Maurice Tiberius. The Byzantine emperors resumed the imperial coinage of Alexandria after their recapture of Egypt in 628 A.D.

The corrosion on this coin looks like bronze disease but this is an old collection coin, we have had it for two years now, and the corrosion does not appear to be active.
BZ93527. Bronze 12 nummi, DOC II-1 192; Hahn MIB 202a; Wroth BMC 276; Tolstoi 107-8; Ratto 1314-5; Morrisson BnF 10/Al/AE/30; SBCV 856; Sommer 11.93, VF, well centered, corrosion, weight 14.900 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, 618 - 628 A.D.; obverse bust of the Sassanid King Khusru II wearing a crown with pendilia and surmounted by a cross within a crescent, star left, crescent moon right; reverse large I B with modified cross potent on globe between, AΛEZ in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 (104.00)


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

|Anonymous| |Folles|, |Byzantine| |Anonymous| |Follis| |of| |Christ,| |Class| |A3,| |Basil| |II| |&| |Constantine| |VIII,| |c.| |1023| |-| |11| |November| |1028| |A.D.||anonymous| |follis|
This coin has a few spots of corrosion on the reverse that could be active. It is, however, from an old collection, so unlikely to be a problem if maintained in a climate controlled environment.
BZ93548. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ class A3; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 14; DOC III-2 A2.14; SBCV 1818; Sommer 40.3, F, well centered on a broad flan, potentially active corrosion, weight 10.732 g, maximum diameter 32.01 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (romanized Hebrew - God is with us), facing nimbate bust of Christ, two pellets in each arm of the cross, pallium, and colobium, Gospels in both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iησοúς Xριστος - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornaments above and below inscription; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 (104.00)


Byzantine Empire, Constans II, September 641 - 15 July 668 A.D.

|Constans| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Constans| |II,| |September| |641| |-| |15| |July| |668| |A.D.||follis|
Sear notes this type is often overstruck on an early follis of Constans II, SBCV 1103.
BZ93533. Bronze follis, Anastasi 113; Tolstoi 187; Morrison BnF 13/Sy/AE/04; SBCV 1106; DOC II-2 177; Wroth BMC 349; Hahn MIB -; Sommer -; Ratto -, VF, overstruck on an earlier follis clipped to reduce the weight, green patina, bold strike but with strong undertype effects, ragged edge, weight 3.650 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Sicily, Syracuse mint, 648 - 650 A.D.; obverse no legend, bust of Constans facing, short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, globus cruciger in right; reverse large M (40 nummi), Kwnstans monogram above; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 (93.60)


Byzantine Empire, Constantine VII and Romanus I Lecapenus, 17 December 920 - 16 December 944 A.D.

|Constantine| |VII|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Constantine| |VII| |and| |Romanus| |I| |Lecapenus,| |17| |December| |920| |-| |16| |December| |944| |A.D.||follis|
Constantine VII became sole emperor while he was a minor. He was dominated by his regents and was not allowed to take part in government. His regent Romanus I was made co-emperor in 920. In 945 Romanus I was deposed by his sons who wanted the throne. Instead Constantine VII took control. Finally, when he was 40 years old, he had sole rule and real power.
BZ93544. Bronze follis, DOC III-2 25, Sommer 36.16, Morrisson BnF 37/Cp/AE/31, Wroth BMC 14, Ratto 1886, SBCV 1760; undertype: SBCV 1729 (Leo VI), VF, dark green patina with earthen highlights, strong undertype effects, weight 9.370 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 931 - 944 A.D.; obverse + RWmAn' bASILEVS RWM' (or similar), Romanus I facing, bearded, wearing jeweled chlamys and crown with cross, globus cruciger in left, transverse labarum in right; reverse + RWMA/n' En ΘEW bA/SILEVS RW/mAIWn in four lines; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 (93.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |114| |-| |95| |B.C.||AE| |15|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY93776. Bronze AE 15, Houghton Lorber 2378(1), Babelon Rois 1509, SNG Spaer 2721, BMC Seleucid 32 - 34, VF, well centered, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, light marks, light corrosion, weight 2.202 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain N. Syria, Phoenicia, or Coele Syria mint, 135 - 95 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse prow right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two lines above, ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $80.00 (83.20)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |28|
The obverse legend abbreviates AYTOKPATΩP KAICAP ΘEOY TPAIANOY ΠAPQIKOY YIOC ΘEOY NEPOYA YIΩNOC TRAIANOC A∆PIANOC CEBACTOC - The Emperor Caesar, son of the divine Trajan Parthicus, grandson of the divine Nerva, Hadrian Augustus.

The countermark with laurel-branch with four leaves in a rectangular punch, 4.5 x 6 mm, is Howgego 378 (69 pcs). The countermark was applied before 132 - 135 A.D.
RY93148. Bronze AE 28, McAlee 536b (scarce); RPC Online III 3694 (13 specs.); BMC Galatia p. 186, 299; SNG Fitz 5890; Butcher 231; c/m: Howgego 378, F, oval flan, clear countermark, legend weak/off flan, rev. flattened opposite c/m, green and red encrustations, weight 14.595 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 11 Aug 117 - c. 132 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC Θ TP Π YI Θ NEP YIW TP A∆PIANOC CEBAC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; countermark: laurel branch with four leaves within rectangular incuse punch; reverse S C (senatus consulto), Γ∆ below, all within laurel wreath; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $70.00 (72.80)




  



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A few quotes from Errett Albert Bishop...

"Mathematics is common sense."

"The real numbers, for certain purposes, are too thin. Many beautiful phenomena become fully visible only when the complex numbers are brought to the fore." (Bishop 1967, Ch. 5, Complex Analysis, p. 113)

"The primary concern of mathematics is number, and this means the positive integers...In the words of Kronecker, the positive integers were created by God. Kronecker would have expressed it even better if he had said that the positive integers were created by God for the benefit of man (and other finite beings). Mathematics belongs to man, not to God. We are not interested in properties of the positive integers that have no descriptive meaning for finite man. When a man proves a positive integer to exist, he should show how to find it. If God has mathematics of his own that needs to be done, let him do it himself." (Bishop 1967, Ch. 1, A Constructivist Manifesto, p. 2)


Errett Bishop, Jane Bishop and Rover are in the photograph right.

Catalog current as of Thursday, October 6, 2022.
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