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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |Errett Bishop Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Errett Bishop Collection

Errett Albert Bishop (July 14, 1928 - April 14, 1983) was an American mathematician known for his work on analysis and a professor at the University of California at San Diego. He expanded constructive analysis in his 1967 Foundations of Constructive Analysis, where he proved most of the important theorems in real analysis by constructive methods. (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Errett_Bishop).

He was also a great father and a fun-loving guy who would take his family biking, surfing, snorkeling, camping, etc. He enjoyed going to auctions, where he would often pick up an interesting artifact or a piece of art. Errett's son, Edward, in the photograph with his father on the right, describes his childhood home as half junk-yard, half museum. Errett especially loved ancient coins, and he was one of the founding members of the Ancient Coin Club in San Diego.

The Errett Bishop Collection includes over 1000 Ancient Greek, Roman Republic, Roman imperial, Roman provincial, Celtic, Judaean, Byzantine and other ancient coins collected from about 1960 to 1982. The collection includes 136 coins from Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. The variety of types and the range from inexpensive to beautiful showcase coins means there are coins in this collection for almost every collection and every budget. Due to the size of the collection, it will be some time before they are all added to the shop. Keep looking here or in our recent additions to see them as we add them.

Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleucus| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GY95974. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Houghton-Lorber I 177; Newell ESM 314; BMC Seleucid p. 3, 33 - 34; HGC 9 18c (R1-R2), aVF, high relief head of Zeus, old cabinet toning, flow lines, porosity, light marks, minor edge flaw on reverse, weight 16.251 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 180o, Susa (Shush, Iran) mint, c. 295 - 280 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus right; reverse Athena driving biga of horned elephants, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on left, ΣEΛEYKOY in exergue, spearhead (control) above right, A(or E or M over Ω?, obscure, control) lower right before elephants; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $1600.00 (€1312.00)


Aspendos, Pamphylia, 333 - 250 B.C.

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |333| |-| |250| |B.C.||stater|
After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own envoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4,000 horses annually.

This type is a late example and likely among the last of the wrestler and slinger staters. Struck during economic crisis, perhaps resulting from the harsh terms set by Alexander after their treachery, the flans are underweight, crudely cast and appear to be of debased silver. The wrestlers and slinger are carelessly depicted. It is not as attractive as earlier examples but it is certainly much scarcer.
GS95992. Silver stater, Tekin Series 5, SNGvA 4576, SNG BnF 122, SNG Cop 240, Arslan-Lightfoot -, Choice gVF, attractive style, toned, obverse edge beveled, edge cracks, weight 10.440 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 333 - 250 B.C.; obverse two wrestlers grappling, nude, wrestler on left holds the right wrist of his opponent with his right hand and right forearm with his left hand, E between their legs, tiny die break on right, beveled edge; reverse slinger, wearing short chiton, discharging sling to right, EΣTFE∆IY upward behind, O between legs, clockwise triskeles of human legs above club on right, round border of dots; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $720.00 (€590.40)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 113 - 95 B.C

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |113| |-| |95| |B.C||tetradrachm|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY95956. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2384; Houghton CSE 725; Babelon Rois 1467; BMC Seleucid p. 92, 6; HGC 9 1288k (R2), gVF, well centered, dark old cabinet toning, old scratches, light deposits, weight 15.977 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 2nd reign, 113 - 112 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochos right; reverse Athena standing left, Nike in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, spear behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY in two lines downward on right, ΦIΛO−ΠATOPOΣ downward on left, ΣI∆Ω/IEP / AΣY in 3 lines over outer left, Σ (year 200) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $630.00 (€516.60)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Apollonia Salbace, Caria

|Other| |Caria|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Apollonia| |Salbace,| |Caria||AE| |30|
This coin is an obverse die match to a coin struck by the neighboring city, Alabanda, Caria, SNG München 464, RPC Online VI T5384. Dies shared by more than one city in the region were first discovered by Konrad Kraft in 1972. Groups of smaller cities in Anatolia shared traveling mints, which would sometimes use the same obverse dies for more than one city.
RP92646. Bronze AE 30, Apparently unpublished; RPC Online -, SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, BMC Caria -, F, porous, turquoise and earthen adhesions, reverse flatly struck, weight 11.787 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 180o, Apollonia Salbace (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYP CEY AΛEΞAN∆PO-C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CTPA AΓAΘEINOY TOY IH AΠOΛΛΩNIATΩN (strategos Agathinos, son of Hie.(?), Apollonia), Zeus standing slightly left, head left, wearing himation and chlamys, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; extremely rare, this is the only specimen of the type known to FORVM; $280.00 (€229.60)


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

|Macrinus|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.||sestertius|
Macrinus was Praetorian Prefect for Caracalla but arranged Caracalla's assassination and seized power. He and his son were accepted by the senate. The Syrian legions, inspired by Julia Maesa, Caracalla's aunt, revolted after he concluded an unfavorable peace with the Persians. He was defeated and executed.
SL92493. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 121 (S), BMCRE V 113, Cohen IV 79, SRCV II 7391, Hunter III -, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 1/5, scratches (577028-007), weight 19.150 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 11 Apr 217 - 31 Dec 217 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PONTIF MAX TR P P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power, father of the country), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, drapery over left arm, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; from the Errett Bishop Collection; NGC| Lookup; $260.00 (€213.20)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

|Postumus|, |Gallic| |Empire,| |Postumus,| |Summer| |260| |-| |Spring| |269| |A.D.||double| |sestertius|NEW
The radiate crown indicates the double denomination. The weights are sometimes no heavier than sestertii of the period, and they are frequently overstruck on coins of the first and second century emperors. Authorities do not agree on the mint. Also, there are also many imitatives or counterfeits, some of which are very crude style, carelessly struck, or both.
RA96316. Orichalcum double sestertius, RIC V-2 169, SRCV III 11065, Cohen VI 380, Hunter IV - (p. xcii), F, well centered on a tight flan, brown patina, weight 16.714 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 165o, uncertain (Cologne?) mint, c. 260 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, captive seated left at feet on left with hands bound behind, S C in exergue; ex Errett Bishop Collection; $160.00 (€131.20)


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. Late 3rd Century B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |Late| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |13|
From the Errett Bishop Collection.

Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB93592. Bronze AE 13, cf. Baldwin Lampsakos plate IX 19-21; BMC Mysia p. 85, 65, Weber 5123, gF, rough green patina, scratches, weight 1.701 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 90o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. late 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head Poseidon right; reverse ΛAM, forepart of Pegasos right, dolphin right below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $150.00 (€123.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Laodicea ad Mare, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Laodicea| |ad| |Mare,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|
McAlee interprets ∆ - E as "∆ EΠAPXEIΩN," meaning "of the four eparchies" and notes, "After Septimius stripped Antioch of its privileges and conferred them on Laodicea-ad-Mare, some coins of Laodicea bear the legend 'Metropolis of the Four Provinces,' and others have a representation of four Tyches. The letters ∆E also regularly appear on the coins of Laodicea from the time of Elagabalus to that of Trebonianus Gallus." McAlee also notes that Severan era coins of Laodicea have a star between the eagles legs, perhaps referring to the beacon of Laodicea's lighthouse.
RY93150. Billon tetradrachm, cf. McAlee 763, Prieur 252 (1 spec.), SNG Righetti 996, SNG München -, aVF, dark brown patina, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, slight porosity, weight 12.296 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 219 A.D.; obverse AVT K M A ANTWNEINOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOC TO B (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 2nd time), eagle standing facing, wings spread, head and tail right, wreath in beak, ∆ - E flanking above wings, star between legs; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $125.00 (€102.50)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

|Julia| |Domna|, |Julia| |Mamaea,| |Augusta| |13| |March| |222| |-| |February| |or| |March| |235| |A.D.||sestertius|
Hera (Juno to the Romans) is the wife and one of three sisters of Zeus in the Olympian pantheon of Greek mythology and religion. Hera's mother is Rhea and her father Cronus. Her chief function was as the goddess of women and marriage. The cow, lion and the peacock were considered sacred to her. Portrayed as majestic and solemn, often enthroned, and crowned with the kalathos. Hera was known for her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus' lovers and offspring, but also against mortals who crossed her. Paris earned Hera's hatred by choosing Aphrodite as the most beautiful goddess.
RB92608. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV SA683, BMCRE VI SA759, Hunter III 38, Cohen IV 33, SRCV II 8230, VF, rough green patina, patina flaking, porosity, earthen deposits, edge cracks, weight 21.460 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 231 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse IVNO AVGVSTAE, Juno seated left, flower in right hand, swathed infant in crook of left arm, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 (€98.40)


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

|Magnentius|, |Magnentius,| |18| |January| |350| |-| |10| |August| |353| |A.D.||heavy| |maiorina|
In 352, Constantius II invaded northern Italy in pursuit of the usurper Magnus Magnentius, who withdrew with his army to Gaul. Constantius declared an amnesty for Magnentius' soldiers, many of whom deserted to him. By the end of the year Constantius entered Milan. After another defeat in battle, Magnentius committed suicide in 353.
RL93376. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Arles 179, Bastien MM 268, LRBC II 437, SRCV V 18824, Cohen VIII 68, Hunter V -, gVF, tight oval flan, uneven strike with small weak areas on edges, tiny deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 4.424 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, spring 351 - August 353 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG ET CAE (victories of our lords, the two emperors and two caesars), two Victories holding shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X, E over IS low center, PAR in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 (€98.40)




  



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A few quotes from Errett Albert Bishop...

"Mathematics is common sense."

"The real numbers, for certain purposes, are too thin. Many beautiful phenomena become fully visible only when the complex numbers are brought to the fore." (Bishop 1967, Ch. 5, Complex Analysis, p. 113)

"The primary concern of mathematics is number, and this means the positive integers...In the words of Kronecker, the positive integers were created by God. Kronecker would have expressed it even better if he had said that the positive integers were created by God for the benefit of man (and other finite beings). Mathematics belongs to man, not to God. We are not interested in properties of the positive integers that have no descriptive meaning for finite man. When a man proves a positive integer to exist, he should show how to find it. If God has mathematics of his own that needs to be done, let him do it himself." (Bishop 1967, Ch. 1, A Constructivist Manifesto, p. 2)


Errett Bishop, Jane Bishop and Rover are in the photograph right.

Catalog current as of Wednesday, December 1, 2021.
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