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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |Maxwell Hunt Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Maxwell Hunt Collection

Maxwell Edward Hunt of Loudon, Tennessee, passed away 27 Aug 2008, at the age of 85. Max was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran of WW II and active in the Covenant Baptist Church. A former resident of Detroit, Michigan, he retired from RCA Service Company in 1984 and moved to Tennessee in 1988. Max was an avid genealogist and a member of the Society of Mayflower Descendants, a sponsor of the Plimoth Plantation and a member of the Clan MacRae Society of North America. Reflecting his faith, the Maxwell Hunt Collection includes many Biblical related coins.


Alabanda, Caria, c. 162 - 161 B.C., Civic Coinage in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

|Other| |Caria|, |Alabanda,| |Caria,| |c.| |162| |-| |161| |B.C.,| |Civic| |Coinage| |in| |the| |Types| |and| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
Alabanda was on the river Marsyas, about twenty miles south of its confluence with the Maeander. It allied with Rome in the war against Philip V of Macedon, c. 197 B.C. Antiochus III took it soon after and renamed it Antiocheia until his defeat in 190 B.C. at the battle of Magnesia. Price dated this series of Alexandrine tetradrachms beginning in 173 B.C. and ending in 167 B.C., when Alabanda was defeated after invading Rhodian territory. Cohen begins the era in 167 B.C., after Caria and Lycia were declared free by the Roman Senate.
SH91501. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2466, MŁller Alexander 1148, SNG Cop 757, Cohen DCA 311, Choice VF, centered on a very broad flan, toned, light graffiti (MENA?) in obverse right field, weight 16.484 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alabanda (Doganyurt, Aydin, Turkey) mint, c. 162 - 161 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus AŽtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Pegasos flying left in lower left field, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, (year 6) under throne; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $500.00 SALE |PRICE| $450.00


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 134 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |134| |-| |135| |A.D.|, |AE| |24|
Simon Bar Kochba led a rebellion against Rome from 133 -135 A.D. This Second Jewish Revolt or "Bar Kochba" uprising ended with Hadrian's destruction of Jerusalem, the founding of "Aelia Capitolina" on the site, and dispersal of the Jews throughout the Roman Empire.
JD91433. Bronze AE 24, Mildenberg 113 (O10/R77), Meshorer TJC 289; Hendin 1437, Sofaer 141, SNG ANS 566, aVF, tight flan, light corrosion, light deposits, weight 11.837 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, year 3 (134 - 135 A.D.); obverse seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates, paleo-Hebrew inscription "Shimon" divided by trunk; reverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "for the freedom of Jerusalem", five-lobed vine-leaf, hanging from curved branch; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $440.00 SALE |PRICE| $396.00


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 494 - 480 B.C.

|Italy|, |Rhegion,| |Bruttium,| |Italy,| |c.| |494| |-| |480| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Rhegion reached great artistic and cultural heights. It was home to academies, such as the Pythagorean School, and to poets, historians and sculptors such as Ibycus, Ippy, and Pythagoras. It was an important ally of the Roman Republic. Rhegium flourished during the Imperial Age but was devastated by several major earthquakes and tsunami. St. Paul passed through Rhegium on his final voyage to Rome.
SL91514. Silver drachm, HN Italy p. 190, 2469; SNG ANS 621; SNG MŁnchen 1565; SNG Cop 1923; BMC Italy p. 373, 1; HGC 1 1630 (R2), NGC VF, strike 4/5, surface 2/5 (2416171-008), weight 5.280 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 270o, Rhegium mint, c. 494 - 480 B.C.; obverse lion's scalp facing; reverse RE-CI-N-O-N (retrograde from 5:00), calf head left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; very rare; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleucus| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91686. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 117(1)c (notes ∆ control var. from Hersh coll.), Newell ESM 4 (∆I), HGC 9 12i, VF/aF, superb sculptural high-relief head of Herakles, bumps and scratches, burnishing on reverse, weight 16.805 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 45o, Seleucia I mint, c. 300 - 296 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus on throne, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, monogram in left field, ∆ (∆I variant) under throne, ΣEΛEYKOY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; very rare control variant; $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

|Titus|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Vespasian, in 70 A.D., and Titus, in 71 A.D., both safely returned from the Judaea to Rome by sea voyage. This reverse, copied from Octavian, was struck on coins of both Vespasian and Titus to honor Neptune Redux and thank him for ensuring their safe return.
RS91561. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 Vespasian 1561, RPC II 1933, RSC II 122, BMCRE II Vespasian 516, BnF III Vespasian 321, Hunter I -, SRCV I 2433, VF, toned, tight flan, bumps and scratches, weight 3.172 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT (N reversed), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse NEP RED, Neptune standing left, nude but for cloak on shoulders, right foot on globe, apluster in right hand resting on knee, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Roman| |Macedonia,| |"Thasian"| |Type,| |c.| |148| |-| |80| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS91475. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 786 (O AE5 / R 624); SNG Cop 1040 ff. (Thasos), aVF, old cabinet toning, well centered, bumps and scratches, die wear, weight 16.517 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, (MH monogram) inner left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenized image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
RB91587. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV 1417, SRCV II 4976, RIC III 1033 var. (no drapery), Cohen III 281 var. (same), Hunter II 163 var. (same), MIR 18 232-6/30 var. (same), VF, nice portrait, green patina, tight flan, light marks, slight porosity, weight 23.418 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Dec 171 - Dec 172 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVI, laureate head right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse IMP VI COS III (imperator 6 times, consul 3 times), Roma seated left on low seat, helmeted and draped, Victory in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, oval shield at side ornamented with head of Medusa, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field at center; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $219.00 SALE |PRICE| $197.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Caracalla|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In 215, Caracalla introduced the double denarius, or antoninianus. This coin was one of the earliest of the, then new, denomination. The weight of the new denomination was less than that of two denarii. The orichalcum and copper coinage disappeared gradually, and by the middle of the third century, with Rome's economy in crisis, the antoninianus was the only official currency.
RS91597. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 258(a) (S), RSC III 279, BMCRE V p. 453, 110, cf. Hunter III 33 (Jupiter head left), SRCV II 6775 (same), Choice gVF, nice portrait, full borders strike, toned, flow lines, light marks, slight porosity, reverse die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.653 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 215 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bearded bust right, seen from the front; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 18 years, consul for the 4th time, father of the country), Jupiter standing half right, head right, left foot forward, nude but for chlamys over left shoulder and arm, thunderbolt at side in right hand, long vertical scepter in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Londinium (London today), established around 43 A.D., was sacked in 60 A.D. by the Iceni led by queen Boudica, but quickly rebuilt. At the end of the 1st century, Londinium was a cosmopolitan community of merchants from across the Empire and the capital of Roman Britain. In 286, the usurper Carausius declared himself the Emperor of Britain. In 296, Rome invaded and reclaimed Britain from his successor Allectus. Twice British legions rebelled and elected their own emperors, Magnus Maximus in 382 and Constantine III, in 407. Both crossed the channel with their legions and were defeated, leaving Britain largely unprotected. As the Empire declined, Britain became increasingly isolated. In 410, the Romano-British authorities appealed to Honorius for help. He replied that the Britons would have to look after their own defenses, meaning Roman occupation of Britain had ended. Britain was increasingly vulnerable to attack by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisii. By the middle 5th century only a small number of wealthy families maintained a Roman lifestyle. At the end of the 5th century the city was largely an uninhabited ruin.Londinium
RA91642. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 128; RIC V-2 101; Hunter IV 36; SRCV IV 13639A; Cohen VII 193, VF, nice portrait, a little rough, ragged edge, weight 4.774 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 289 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing slightly left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, F - O flanking at sides, ML in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 123 - 104 B.C.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |123| |-| |104| |B.C.|, |cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS91522. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum p. 80, 8; Pinder -; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered, old collection toning, bumps and marks, die wear, weight 12.250 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 45o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 123 - 104 B.C.; obverse cista mystica with half open lid, from which a snake emerges left, all within wreath of ivy leaves and berries; reverse bow-case ornamented with an apluster, strung bow emerging upper left, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, WPA monogram (control) between heads of snakes, straps from case draped over snakes below, (Pergamon monogram) to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00




  



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