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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia| ▸ |Pergamon||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Pergamon, Mysia
Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |133| |-| |16| |B.C.||AE| |19|
When the Pergamene king Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic. The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
GB111742. Bronze AE 19, SNG BnF 1808 (no rev. X); SNG Tb 2415 var. (same); BMC Mysia p. 129, 158 var. (same); SNGvA 1371 var. (same); SNG Cop -, aVF, obv. a little off center, green patina, weight 7.793 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse Asklepian snake coiled around omphalos, head right, X inner right field, AΣKΛHΠIOY downward on right, ΣΩTHPOΣ downward on left (of the savior Asklepios); rare variation; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 134 A.D.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |134| |A.D.||dupondius|
Eurypylos was a Mysian hero of the Trojan War. His image is otherwise unknown on coinage. Like Bellerophon at Corinth and Dionysos at Tium, this image of a local hero appears modeled on Antinous. Homer (Odyssey 11.522) has Odysseus say that Eurypylus was, next to Memnon, the most beautiful man he had ever seen.

The strategos I. Pollion is named on several coin types of Pergamon during the reign of Hadrian, including one for Sabina (RPC III 1737) and another for Antinous (RPC III, 1738).

The link between Pergamon and Paphos, evidenced by this coin, is not well understood. However, the same reverse was used, from Hadrian to Philip I, on coins struck to honor an alliance between Sardes and Paphos.
RP96071. Orichalcum dupondius, RPC Online III 1740 (4 spec.), SNG BnF 1897, Weber 5206, SNG Cop -, BMC Mysia -, F, porous, reverse off center, countermark obscure, weight 11.652 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, time of Hadrian, c. 134 A.D.; obverse HPΩC EYPYΠYΛOC (Hero Eurypylos), head of hero Eurypylos (with the features of Antinous) right, flowing hair, uncertain oval countermark; reverse ΠEPΓAMHNΩN EΠI CTP ΠΩΛΛIΩNOC (Pergamon, struck under strategos Pollion), temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, in which conical xoanon, semicircular walled courtyard, ΠAΦIA (of Paphos) across the courtyard; extremely rare, the 5th known; SOLD


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |133| |-| |16| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 B.C., to prevent a civil war, he bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
SH68304. Bronze AE 21, SNG BnF 1790; SNGvA 1379; SNG Tb 2445; SNG Cop 365; BMC Mysia p. 128, 142, EF, light cleaning scratches, weight 7.031 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, Roman rule, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, crested Attic helmet ornamented with a star, EΠI ΠEPΓAMOY below; reverse Nike standing right, crowning ethnic with wreath in in extended right hand, palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, ΠEPΓAMHNΩN downward on right; SOLD


Pergamene Kingdom, Eumenes I, 263 - 241 B.C.

|Pergamene| |Kingdom|, |Pergamene| |Kingdom,| |Eumenes| |I,| |263| |-| |241| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Upon his succession, Eumenes, perhaps with the encouragement of Ptolemy II, who was at war with the Seleucids, revolted, defeating the Seleucid king Antiochus I near the Lydian capital of Sardis in 261 B.C. He was thus able to free Pergamon and greatly increase the territories under his control. Although he never took the title of king, Eumenes did exercise all of the powers of one. Since he had no surviving heir, Eumenes adopted his second cousin, Attalus I, who succeeded him as ruler of Pergamon.
SH08957. Silver tetradrachm, Westermark group II (V.VIII); Meydancikkale 3002 (same obv. die); SNG BnF 1604; SNGvA 7452; BMC Mysia p. 115, 30; SNG Cop -, VF, high relief portrait, weight 17.02 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, obverse head of Philetaerus right, wearing taenia diadem; reverse ΦIΛΕTAIPOY downward on right, Athena enthroned left, wearing crested helmet, chiton and peplos, right hand supporting grounded round shield before her, shield ornamented with a gorgoneion, resting left elbow on left arm of throne which is ornamented with a sphinx, transverse spear leaning on left arm, ivy leaf above knee, A on throne, bow outer right; ex Freeman and Sear; SOLD


Pergamene Kingdom, Eumenes I, 263 - 241 B.C.

|Pergamene| |Kingdom|, |Pergamene| |Kingdom,| |Eumenes| |I,| |263| |-| |241| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Upon his succession, Eumenes, perhaps with the encouragement of Ptolemy II, who was at war with the Seleucids, revolted, defeating the Seleucid king Antiochus I near the Lydian capital of Sardis in 261 B.C. He was thus able to free Pergamon and greatly increase the territories under his control. Although he never took the title of king, Eumenes did exercise all of the powers of one. Since he had no surviving heir, Eumenes adopted his second cousin, Attalus I, who succeeded him as ruler of Pergamon.
SH54018. Silver tetradrachm, Westermark group V (V.LXXXV), SNG BnF 1618, Meydancikkale 3041, VF, high relief portrait, weight 16.345 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 263 - 241 B.C.; obverse Philetairos (founder of the Attalid dynasty) diademed head right; reverse Athena enthroned left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, crowning dynastic name with wreath in right hand, ΦIΛETAIPOY downward on left, spear leaning transverse on her far side, resting left arm on round shield leaning against throne, grape bunch to outer left, A to inner left, bow to right; rare; SOLD


Pergamene Kingdom, Attalos I, 241 - 197 B.C.

|Pergamene| |Kingdom|, |Pergamene| |Kingdom,| |Attalos| |I,| |241| |-| |197| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Attalus, a capable general, champion of the Greeks, and loyal ally of Rome, made Pergamon a powerful kingdom. He earned the name "Soter" (savior) by defeating the Galatians, who had plundered and exacted tribute for more than a generation. In the Macedonian Wars he allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon.
SH59510. Silver tetradrachm, Westermark group VIA; SNG BnF 1621, Meydancikkale 3045 ff., SNGvA 1359, SNG Delepierre -, SNG Cop -, VF, high-relief sculptural portrait, weight 16.428 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, 263 - 241 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Philetaerus right in taenia; reverse ΦIΛΕTAIPOY downward on left, Athena enthroned left, crowning dynastic name with wreath in right hand, left arm resting on shield with gorgoneion at side, transverse spear in background, palm frond outer left, strung bow right; SOLD


Pergamene Kingdom, Eumenes I, 263 - 241 B.C.

|Pergamene| |Kingdom|, |Pergamene| |Kingdom,| |Eumenes| |I,| |263| |-| |241| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Upon his succession, Eumenes, perhaps with the encouragement of Ptolemy II, who was at war with the Seleucids, revolted, defeating the Seleucid king Antiochus I near the Lydian capital of Sardis in 261 B.C. He was thus able to free Pergamon and greatly increase the territories under his control. Although he never took the title of king, Eumenes did exercise all of the powers of one. Since he had no surviving heir, Eumenes adopted his second cousin, Attalus I, who succeeded him as ruler of Pergamon.
SH10706. Silver tetradrachm, Westermark group III (V.XVIII/R.4); SNG BnF 1606; SNG Cop 334; SNGvA 7453; Meydancikkale 3003; BMC Mysia p. 115, 31, Choice gVF, superb high relief portrait, well centered and struck, attractive toning, minor porosity, weight 16.92 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, obverse head of Philetaerus right, wearing entwined laurel wreath and diadem; reverse ΦIΛΕTAIPOY downward on right, Athena enthroned left, wearing crested helmet, chiton and peplos, right hand supporting grounded round shield before her, shield ornamented with a gorgoneion, resting left elbow on left arm of throne which is ornamented with a sphinx, transverse spear leaning on left arm, ivy leaf above knee, A on throne, bow outer right; SOLD


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 104 - 98 B.C.

|Cistophori|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |104| |-| |98| |B.C.||cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS86489. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 12; Pinder 95; SNG Cop 420; BMC Mysia p. 124, 106; SNGvA -; SNG BnF -, VF, attractive toning, light marks, weight 12.591 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 104 - 98 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case ornamented with an apluster, strung bow emerging upper left, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, ΔI above between heads of snakes, straps from case draped over snakes below, (Pergamon monogram) to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; SOLD


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 92 - 88 B.C.

|Cistophori|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |92| |-| |88| |B.C.||cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS86483. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum p. 80, 13; Pinder -; SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, toned, centered, bumps and marks, struck with a worn obverse die, weight 12.572 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 92 - 88 B.C.; obverse cista mystica with half open lid, from which a snake emerges left, all within wreath of ivy leaves and berries; reverse bow-case ornamented with an apluster, strung bow emerging upper left, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, EY (control) between heads of snakes, straps from case draped over snakes below, (Pergamon monogram) to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; very rare; SOLD


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 85 - 76 B.C.

|Cistophori|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |85| |-| |76| |B.C.||cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS91390. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 32, Pinder 107, SNG BnF 1734, SNG Cop 430, VF, toned, a little flatly struck, some die wear, weight 12.287 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 30o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 76 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow, ornamented with apluster, flanked on each side by snake with head erect, ΔI (control) over Prytaneis monogram between heads of snakes, case straps draped over snakes below, (Pergamon monogram) to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD







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REFERENCES

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