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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Phrygia| ▸ |Laodicea ad Lycus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Laodicea ad Lycus

Laodiceia ad Lycum was founded probably by Antiochus II Theos (261 - 46 B.C.), and named after his wife Laodice. The principal deity of the city was Laodicean Zeus or Zeus Aseis. "Aseis" may be linked to the Arabic "aziz" which means powerful and may indicate Syrian influence on the cult. Laodiceia's cosmopolitan population included many people of Syrian origin. There was also a large and prosperous Jewish community whose members had freedom of worship. Laodicea is one of the oldest homes of Christianity and the seat of one of the seven churches of the Apocalypse.


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Laodicea, Province of Asia

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Like many of the cistophoric tetradrachms of Hadrian, this coin is overstruck on a coin of Augustus.
RS42470. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, RIC II 497 var., RSC II 275 var., BMCRE 1066 var., SRCV I 3441 var., Metcalf Cistophori 56 var. (all var. with bare head right), aVF, overstruck, weight 10.129 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 195o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, 129 - 132 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, bare-headed draped bust right; reverse COS III, Zeus Laodiceus standing left, draped to the feet, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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RPC notes that the reverse legend is hard to interpret and that perhaps Anto Zenon, son of Zenon helped closing a dispute between Laodicea and Smyrna.
RP82821. Leaded bronze AE 28, RPC I 2928, SNG Cop 614, VF/aVF, weight 11.448 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse NEPΩN ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse ANTΩ ZHNΩNOΣ ZHNΩN YIOΣ ΛAO∆IKEΩN ZMYPNAIΩN OMHPOΣ, facing Demoi of Laodicea and Smyrna, clasping hands and holding scepters; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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Herodotus describes the following story relevant to the olive wreath. Xerxes was interrogating some Arcadians after the Battle of Thermopylae. Asked why there were so few Greek men defending the Thermopylae, they answered, "All other men are participating in the Olympic Games." And when asked "What is the prize for the winner?", "An olive-wreath" came the answer. Then Tigranes, one of his generals uttered a most noble saying: "Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for honor."
RP82824. Bronze AE 25, BMC Phrygia p. 311, 202; SNG München 388; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, Choice aVF, weight 10.563 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse AY KAI TI AI A∆P ANTΩNEINOC, laureate head right; reverse ΠO AIΛIOC ∆IONYCIOC ΛAO∆IKEΩN in five lines within olive wreath with berries; SOLD


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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BMC assigns this type to Augustus. RPC I assigns it to Tiberius but notes the difficulty in determining if it is a coin of Augustus or Tiberius. It certainly looks like Augustus, but many portraits of Tiberius intentionally exaggerate his resemblance to Augustus. In any case, it is a beautiful portrait in fine Greek style. We know the KOP monogram stands for KORNHLIOS because it is spelled out in full on coins of another Dioscourides under Domitian.
RP58876. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2906; SNG Cop 547; BMC Phrygia p. 301, 141 (Augustus), VF, weight 6.116 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse ∆IOΣKOYPI∆HΣ ΛAO∆IKEΩN, Zeus Laodicea standing left with eagle and staff, KOP monogram outer right; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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Antiochus the Great transported 2,000 Jewish families to Phrygia from Babylonia. Many of Laodicea's inhabitants were Jews. Cicero records that Flaccus confiscated 9 kg of gold which was being sent to Jerusalem for the Temple (Pro Flacco 28-68). During the Roman period Laodicea was the chief city of a Roman conventus, which comprised twenty-four cities besides itself.
GB62565. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 2917, SNG Cop 562, BMC Phrygia 14, VF, weight 7.914 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP, bare-headed and draped bust right; reverse ΓAIOY ΠOΣTOMOY ΛAO∆IKEΩN, Zeus Laodiceus standing left, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand, B in wreath left; nice patina, bold, high-relief; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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In 363 A.D., the Council of Laodicea, a regional synod of approximately thirty clerics from Asia Minor, decided the doctrine of the Christian church and the contents of the Bible. They also formally renounced the Sabbath, on Saturday, and instituted a new Lord's Day, on Sunday.
RP21887. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 2926, VF, weight 6.202 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse NEPΩN ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse ΛAO∆IKEΩN AINEIAΣ, Zeus Laodikeios standing left, holding eagle and staff; brown patina; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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Antiochus the Great transported 2,000 Jewish families to Phrygia from Babylonia. Many of Laodicea's inhabitants were Jews. Cicero records that Flaccus confiscated 9 kg of gold which was being sent to Jerusalem for the Temple (Pro Flacco 28-68). During the Roman period Laodicea was the chief city of a Roman conventus, which comprised twenty-four cities besides itself.
SH58869. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2917, SNG Cop 562, BMC Phrygia 14, VF, weight 6.638 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP, bare-headed and draped bust right; reverse ΓAIOY ΠOΣTOMOY ΛAO∆IKEΩN, Zeus Laodiceus standing left, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand, B in wreath left; nice patina, bold, high-relief; SOLD


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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BMC assigns this type to Augustus. RPC I assigns it to Tiberius but notes the difficulty in determining if it is a coin of Augustus or Tiberius. It certainly looks like Augustus, but many portraits of Tiberius intentionally exaggerate his resemblance to Augustus. In any case, it is a beautiful portrait in fine Greek style. We know the KOP monogram stands for KORNHLIOS because it is spelled out in full on coins of another Dioscourides under Domitian.
RP35195. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 2911; SNG Cop 549; BMC Phrygia p. 301, 143 and pl. XXXVII, 1 (Augustus), VF, nice style, weight 5.562 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse ∆IOΣKOYPI∆HE TO ∆EYTEPON ΛAO∆IKEΩN, Zeus Laodicea standing left with eagle and staff, KOP monogram outer right; SOLD


Laodicea ad Lycum, Phrygia, c. 62 A.D.

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This magistrate, Ioulios Andronikos, struck larger a imperial denomination for Emperor Nero, and smaller "pseudo-autonomous" denominations for Demos (male) and the Boule of Laodicea (male). At the same time, another magistrate, Ioulia Zenonis (female), struck smaller imperial coins for Empress Poppaea (Nero's wife), and smaller "pseudo-autonomous" for the personification of Laodicea (female). Ioulios Andronikos and Ioulia Zenonis may have been husband and wife. Female magistrates were unusual in the ancient Greek world but Ioulia Zenonis was a member of the Zenonid family, which was long powerful in Laodicea.
RP89872. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 2922 (3 spec.), SNG Cop 515, BMC Phrygia p. 6, 72, cf. SNGvA 3812 (same types larger denomination), VF, attractive dark green patina with some highlighting earthen deposits, areas of light porosity, some die wear, weight 6.864 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycum mint, time of Nero, c. 62 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOΣ ΛAO∆IKEΩN (counterclockwise from upper left), laureate head of Demos right; reverse Zeus standing left, eagle in extended right hand, vertical scepter in left hand; IOYΛIOΣ AN∆ΠONIKOΣ (Ioulios Andronikos [magistrate]) in two downward lines on right, EYEPΓETHΣ ΛAO∆IKEΩN in two downward lines on left; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia

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RP49307. Bronze AE 26, BMC Phygia p. 320, 243; SNG Cop 597; SNGvA 3859 (Caracalla), SNG München -, SNG Tüb -, gVF, weight 8.349 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT K M AYP ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, uncertain countermark; reverse ΛAO∆IKEΩN NEΩKOPΩN, Tyche Pantheia standing half left, winged, modius on head, wearing kalathos, crescent behind shoulders, ears of grain and rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, wheel of Nemesis at feet; attractive green patina; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
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Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum (Izmir), Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, August 20, 2019.
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Laodicea ad Lycus