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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Greece| ▸ |Lokris||View Options:  |  |  |   

Lokris, Greece

Lokris (Locris) consisted of a narrow strip upon the east coast of central Greece, from the pass of Thermopylae to the mouth of the river Cephissus. The northern frontier town was Alpeni, which bordered upon the Malians, and the southern frontier town was Larymna, which at a later time belonged to Boeotia. On the west, the Locrians were separated from Phocis and Boeotia by a range of mountains, extending from Mount Oeta and running parallel to the coast. The Lokrians, however, did not inhabit this coast continuously, but were divided by a narrow slip of Phokis, which extended to the Euboean sea, and contained the Phokian seaport town of Daphnus. Lokrians north of Daphnus were called Epicnemidii, from Mount Cnemis; and to the south were named Opuntii, from Opus, their principal city. Lokris is mountainous but there are several fruitful valleys, and the fertility of the whole of the Lokrian coast is praised both by ancient and modern observers. The cities and towns of the Lokri Epicnemidii, along the coast from north to south, were: Alpenus, Nicaea, Scarphe (Scarpheia), Thronium, Cnemis (Cnemides), more inland, Tarphe later Pharygae, and Augeiae. The cities and towns of the Lokri Opuntii, along the coast from north to south, were: Alope, Kynos, Opus, Halae, Larymna which later belonged to Boeotia, more inland, Calliarus, Naryx, and Corseia. Lokrians are mentioned by Homer, who describes them as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships. In the Persian War the Opuntian Lokrians fought with Leonidas at the Battle of Thermopylae, and also sent seven ships to the Greek fleet. The Lokrians fought on the side of Sparta in the Peloponnesian War.


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, c. 387 - 369 B.C.

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Due to the proximity of the mountains to the coast there was no room for considerable rivers in Lokris. The largest, only a mountain torrent, is the Boagrius, also called also Manes by Strabo, rising in Mount Cnemis, and flowing into the sea between Scarpheia and Thronium. The only other river mentioned by name is the Platanius, a small stream, which flows into the Opuntian gulf near the Boeotian frontier; it is the river which flows from the modern village of Proskyna.
GS25336. Silver obol, BMC Central p. 1, 4 ff., VF, toned, weight 0.741 g, maximum diameter 11.9 mm, Locri Opuntii mint, c. 387 - 369 B.C.; obverse OΠON, amphora, bunch of grapes left, ivy-leaf right; reverse star of sixteen rays; ex Knobloch catalog 29, November 1965, lot 119; rare; SOLD


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, 350 - 340 B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
GS79272. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Lokris 68; SNG Lockett 1699; HGC 4 996; BMC Central p. 2, 17; cf. SNG Cop 53 (control symbol - lion on inside of shield), F, rainbow toning, obverse slightly off-center, weight 2.577 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 0o, Lokri Opuntii mint, 350 - 340 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter left, wreathed in grain, wearing drop earring; reverse OΠONTIΩN, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, wearing Corinthian helmet, nude, short sword in right, broken spear on ground in background, no control symbol inside shield; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren, ex Don Bakker; SOLD


Opus, Lokris Opuntia, Greece, 338 - 300 B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
GS08278. Silver triobol, BCD Lokris 104, SNG Cop 62, SGCV I 2332, F, weight 2.40 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 180o, Opus mint, 338 - 300 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse ΛOKPΩN, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, nude but for crested Corinthian helmet, short sword in right hand, shield on left arm ornamented inside with hippocamp (control symbol) in left, trident head (control symbol) in right field; SOLD


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, 360 - 350 B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
RS87434. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Lokris 50 - 51; McClean II 5440; Traité III p. 369, 433; Delbridge Corpus group 4; cf. SNG Cop 53 (lion control), aVF/F, light toning, scratches, pitting, weight 2.382 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 270o, Lokri Opuntii mint, 360 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, wreathed in grain, wearing drop earring and necklace; reverse OΠONTIΩN, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, helmeted, naked, short sword in right, shield in left ornamented inside with a griffin (control symbol), broken spear on ground in background; ex Wilson H. Guertin; SOLD


Lokris Opuntia, Lokris, Greece, c. 369 - 338 B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
GS80258. Silver 1/4 stater, SGCV I 2330, BMC Central p. 2, 17, aVF, weight 2.595 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lokris Opuntia mint, c. 369 - 338 B.C.; obverse head of Persephone right, wearing wreath of grain, single-pendant earring, and pearl necklace; reverse OΠONTIΩN, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, nude but for crested Corinthian helmet, short sword in right hand, shield on left arm ornamented inside with lion(?) forepart right (control symbol), broken spear on the ground; scarce; SOLD


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, c. 350 - 340 B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
GS84492. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Lokris 369; SNG Lockett 1697; BMC Central p. 3, 26; SNG Cop -, F, well centered, high relief, lamination defects, scratches, edge chips, corrosion, silver encrustations, weight 1.924 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 0o, Lokri Opuntii mint, c. 350 - 340 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, wreathed in grain, wearing drop earring and necklace; reverse OΠON−TIΩN, Ajax son of Oileus advancing right in fighting attitude, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, nude, short sword in right hand, oval shield on left arm, shield ornamented inside bottom with a lion forepart right (control symbol), spear on ground in background; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; SOLD


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, c. 340 - 330 B.C.

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Locrians are mentioned by Homer, who describes them as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships. In the Persian War the Opuntian Locrians fought with Leonidas at the Battle of Thermopylae, and also sent seven ships to the Greek fleet. The Locrians fought on the side of Sparta in the Peloponnesian War.

The star on the reverse may represent the Halley's Comet visible in 373 - 372 B.C.
GS88326. Silver obol, BCD Lokris 91; SNG Cop 63; BMC Central p. 6, 45; Weber 3149; HGC 4 976 (S), VF, etched porous surfaces, weight 0.688 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, Locri Opuntii mint, c. 340 - 330 B.C.; obverse ΛO-KP (counterclockwise) from left, amphora, small bunch of grapes on left and ivy leaf on right each hanging on vines from the mouth of the vase; reverse stylized star of 16 rays, 8 of the rays slightly smaller and between the other 8, pellet in linear circle in center; ex Forum (2010); scarce; SOLD


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, c. 325 - 300 B.C.

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Locrians are mentioned by Homer, who describes them as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships. In the Persian War the Opuntian Locrians fought with Leonidas at the Battle of Thermopylae, and also sent seven ships to the Greek fleet. The Locrians fought on the side of Sparta in the Peloponnesian War.
GB49605. Bronze AE 13, BCD Lokris (NAC 55) 115.1 (this coin); BMC Central 58 corr. (O present, not described); Delbridge corpus group 6b, 31a, aF, dark sea-green patina, weight 1.941 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 0o, Lokri Opuntii mint, obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse ΛOK−PΩN, bunch of grapes with tendrils and vine leaves, O above; ex BCD Collection, ex Numismatic Ars Classica Auction 55, 115.1; SOLD


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, 68 - 69 A.D.

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BCD noted, "Apparently all known coins of this type are countermarked on the obverse with ΛO in ligature [within round incuse]; this coin however does not show any trace of countermarking."
GB49607. Bronze AE 22, BCD Lokris (NAC 55) 157.1 (this coin); Delbridge corpus group 41, 9d; apparently unique without countermark, Fair, green patina, weight 6.418 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Lokri Opuntii mint, 68 - 69 A.D.; obverse wreathed head of Demeter right, poppy head right; reverse XEΠAΠIΩNOX OΠOYNTIΩN EΠIKΛAY∆IOY, helmeted warrior in short chiton, standing left with shield and spear, resting right arm on hip; ex BCD Collection, ex Numismatic Ars Classica Auction 55, 157.1; SOLD


Lokri Opuntii, Lokris, Greece, 2nd Century B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of Oïleus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
GB49608. Bronze AE 16, BCD Lokris (NAC 55) 147.6 (this coin); Delbridge corpus group 32.2, 26a, Fine, nice style, weight 2.745 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Lokri Opuntii mint, 2nd century B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right; reverse OΠOYNTIΩN, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, nude but for crested Corinthian helmet, short sword in right hand, shield on left arm; ex BCD Collection, ex Numismatic Ars Classica Auction 55, 147.6; rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Babelon, J. Catalogue de la collection de Luynes: monnaies greques. (Paris, 1924-1936).
Brett, A. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Delbridge, D. Locri Opuntii Corpus. Unpublished.
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922 - 1929).
Head, B. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Central Greece (Locris, Phocis, Boeotia, and Euboea). (London, 1884).
Grose, S.W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Vol. II: The Greek| mainland, the Aegaean| islands, Crete|. (Cambridge, 1926).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Naville Co. Monnaies grecques antiques; provenant de la collection de feu le prof. S. Pozzi. Auction 1 (4 April 1921, Geneva).
Numismatica Ars Classica NAC AG. The BCD Collection, Lokris - Phokis. Auction 55. (8 October 2010). Zürich.
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Strauss, P. Collection Maurice Laffaille - monnaies grecques en bronze. (Bàle, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 3: Akarnanien-Bithynien. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 3: Macedonia - Aegina (gold and silver). (London, 1942).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 6, The Alpha Bank Numismatic Collection, From Thessaly to Euboea. (Athens, 2011).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 17, 2019.
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Lokris