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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Constantinopolis||View Options:  |  |  | 

Constantinopolis on Ancient Coins
Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D.

|Theodosius| |I|, |Theodosius| |I,| |19| |January| |379| |-| |17| |January| |395| |A.D.||solidus|
On 24 November 380, Theodosius I made his adventus, or formal entry, into Constantinople.
SH37592. Gold solidus, RIC IX Constantinopolis 70(b)1, Depeyrot 48/4, SRCV V 20398, Cohen VIII 10, choice VF, weight 4.348 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 387 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGGG A (harmony among our three emperors, 1st officina), Constantinopolis seated facing on throne, her helmeted head right, right leg bare, right foot on prow, long grounded scepter in right hand, shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X in left hand supported on the left arm of the throne, each arm of the throne ornamented with a lion head, CONOB in exergue; ex Baldwin's (London); rare; SOLD


Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

|Valentinian| |III|, |Valentinian| |III,| |23| |October| |425| |-| |16| |March| |455| |A.D.||solidus|
"The 'Solidus' was a revision instituted about 310 by Constantine I to the Roman gold coin standard, the 'aureus'. The aureus weight had fluctuated but settled at five to the Roman ounce, which meant that it was not a standard weight since the Romans had no name for a fifth of an ounce. Constantine I struck solidi at six to the ounce, which equaled the Roman weight unit of the 'sextula'. Solidi were struck at about 98% fineness and were 20-21 mm's in diameter. With the defeat of the Licinii by Constantine in 324 the solidus became the standard Roman gold coin and remained so for over 600 years." - from Moneta Historical Research by Tom Schroer
SH37575. Gold solidus, RIC X Theodosius II 260, Choice aEF, weight 4.375 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 430 - 440 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTIN-IANVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, spear over shoulder, shield in left decorated with horseman trampling fallen foe; reverse VOT XXX MVLT XXXX B, Constantinopolis enthroned left, wearing helmet, globus cruciger in right hand, scepter in left hand, shield resting at side of throne, star right; rare (RIC R2); SOLD


Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

|Valentinian| |III|, |Valentinian| |III,| |23| |October| |425| |-| |16| |March| |455| |A.D.||solidus|
"The 'Solidus' was a revision instituted about 310 by Constantine I to the Roman gold coin standard, the 'aureus'. The aureus weight had fluctuated but settled at five to the Roman ounce, which meant that it was not a standard weight since the Romans had no name for a fifth of an ounce. Constantine I struck solidi at six to the ounce, which equaled the Roman weight unit of the 'sextula'. Solidi were struck at about 98% fineness and were 20-21 mm's in diameter. With the defeat of the Licinii by Constantine in 324 the solidus became the standard Roman gold coin and remained so for over 600 years." - from Moneta Historical Research by Tom Schroer
SH46449. Gold solidus, RIC X Theodosius II 260, Choice aEF, weight 4.375 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 430 - 440 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTIN-IANVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, spear over shoulder, shield in left decorated with horseman trampling fallen foe; reverse VOT XXX MVLT XXXX B, Constantinopolis enthroned left, wearing helmet, globus cruciger in right hand, scepter in left hand, shield resting at side of throne, star right; rare (RIC R2); SOLD


Theodosius II, 10 January 402 - 28 July 450 A.D.

|Theodosius| |II|, |Theodosius| |II,| |10| |January| |402| |-| |28| |July| |450| |A.D.||solidus|
"The 'Solidus' was a revision instituted about 310 by Constantine I to the Roman gold coin standard, the 'aureus'. The aureus weight had fluctuated but settled at five to the Roman ounce, which meant that it was not a standard weight since the Romans had no name for a fifth of an ounce. Constantine I struck solidi at six to the ounce, which equaled the Roman weight unit of the 'sextula'. Solidi were struck at about 98% fineness and were 20-21 mm's in diameter. With the defeat of the Licinii by Constantine in 324 the solidus became the standard Roman gold coin and remained so for over 600 years." - from Moneta Historical Research by Tom Schroer
SH10972. Gold solidus, RIC X Theodosius II 319, EF, weight 4.441 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 441 - 450 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, helmeted pearl-diademed, cuirassed, bust facing, spear in right hand over shoulder, shield decorated with horseman riding down enemy on left arm; reverse IMPXXXXII COS XXIIPP E, Constantinopolis enthroned left, globus cruciger in right hand, scepter in left hand, foot on prow, left elbow on shield at side, star left, COMOB in exergue; ex Colosseum Coin Exchange; rare (R4); SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

|Constantius| |II|, |Constantius| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |3| |November| |361| |A.D.||solidus|
In 354, Constantius II recalled his legate (and cousin) Constantius Gallus to Constantinople after receiving unfavorable reports about him. Caesar of the East, Gallus had successfully suppressed revolts in Palestine and central Anatolia. Constantius stripped him of his rank and later had him executed in Pola (in modern Croatia).
SH70831. Gold solidus, Depeyrot 6/3, RIC VIII Antioch 81 var. (unlisted officina), VF, digs and scratches on obverse, weight 4.225 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, late 347 - 355 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA REI-PVBLICAE, Roma on left, enthroned facing, holding spear; Constantinopolis on right, enthroned half-left, right foot on prow, scepter in left; both hold shield inscribed VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines; SMANI in ex; ex CNG auction 306, lot 431; ex Kelly J. Krizan M.D. Collection; rare; SOLD


Theodosius II, 10 January 402 - 28 July 450 A.D.

|Theodosius| |II|, |Theodosius| |II,| |10| |January| |402| |-| |28| |July| |450| |A.D.||solidus|
RIC X 301 has five points, as does this specimen, however, the point after XVII is missing and an extra point appears after the final P. The only other attested example in RIC X with a misplaced point is in the footnotes on p.262 for an example of RIC X 295 with C.OS
SH53624. Gold solidus, RIC X Theodosius II 301 var, gVF, weight 4.476 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 441 - 450 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, helmeted bust facing, pearl diademed, cuirassed, spear in right over shoulder, shield decorated with a horseman riding down an enemy on his left arm; reverse IMPXXXXIICOS XVII PP, Constantinopolis enthroned left, holding cross on globe and scepter, foot on a prow, left elbow resting on shield at her side, star left, COMOB in exergue; rare; SOLD


Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

|Arcadius|, |Arcadius,| |19| |January| |383| |-| |1| |May| |408| |A.D.||solidus|
In 400, the Great Palace in Constantinople was burned to the ground in riots. In the chaos, the Gothic leader Gainas attempted to evacuate his soldiers out of the city but 7,000 armed Goths were trapped and killed by order of Arcadius. After the massacre, Gainas escaped across the Hellespont, but his rag-tag ad hoc fleet was destroyed by Fravitta, a Gothic chieftain in imperial service. In winter, Gainas led his remaining Goths back to their homeland across the Danube where they were attacked and killed by the Huns. Uldin, the Hun chieftain, sent Gainas' head to Arcadius as a gift.
SH10007. Gold solidus, DOCLR 217 (also 9th officina), RIC X Arcadius 7 (S), Depeyrot 55/1, SRCV V 20706, Hunter V 33 - 34 var. (officina), about Mint State, weight 4.35 g, 9th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 397 - c. 403 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, helmeted bust facing, pearl diademed, cuirassed, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm decorated with a horseman riding down and spearing a fallen enemy; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG Θ (harmony between the two emperors, 9th officina), Constantinopolis enthroned facing, holding Victory on globe in left and scepter in right, foot on prow, CONOB in exergue; scarce; SOLD







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