Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |J. Berlin Caesarea Collection||View Options:  |  |  | 

The Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection

The Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection includes a wide variety of ancient coin and artifact types including Judaean, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic. All the collection specimens have one thing in common - they were found in the vicinity of Caesarea, Israel.

Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Akko-Ptolemais, Phoenicia

|Phoenicia|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Akko-Ptolemais,| |Phoenicia||AE| |27|
Akko was refounded as a Roman colony, colonia Ptolemais, probably in 53 or 54 A.D., the last year of Claudius' reign or the first year of Nero’s. Akko was one of hundreds of cities in the Roman provinces that minted civic coins. In the mid 3rd century cities stopped producing their own coins. The last city coins were struck under Gallienus, and Akko was among the very last cities to strike its own coins.
JD96394. Bronze AE 27, BMC Phoenicia p. 138, 50 var. (obv. leg.); Rosenberger 86 var. (same); Kadman Akko 256 var. (same, draped); Sofaer 293 ff. (draped, etc.); SNG Cop -, aF, rough green patina, light earthen deposits, a little off center, weight 13.158 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Ake Ptolemais (Acre, Israel) mint, 253 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES LIC GALLIEN[VS AVG], laureate head right; reverse COL P-TOL, portable shrine containing a statue of Zeus Heliopolites, shrine consisting of a frame within two pillars supporting a architrave with hatched decoration, two carrying poles projecting from bottom, figure of deity within standing facing on rock or base, wearing short chiton, double axe in right hand, harpe(?) in left hand; an unpublished variant of a very rare type; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, 1977 surface find at Caesarea Maritima, Israel; $550.00 SALE |PRICE| $495.00


Caesarea Maritima, Judaea / Syria Palaestina, 1st - 3rd Century A.D., Lead Half Italian Litra Weight

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Judaea| |/| |Syria| |Palaestina,| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.,| |Lead| |Half| |Italian| |Litra| |Weight|
A nearly identical specimen, from the same mold, was found near Caesarea Maritima in 1949 and is listed in the Corpus Inscriptionum Iudaeae/Palaestinae, Vol. II, Ameling, Cotton, Eck, et.al. on page 621. According to the authors, in Judaea, the term "litra" derived from the Roman word "libra" came to indicate local weight standards between the 1st and 2nd centuries CE. Therefore the word Iταλικη (Italica) was added whenever the Roman standard was intended. This weight is inscribed to indicate it is half an Italian litra. It is about 8 grams short of the standard but it probably originally had an handle attached that would have made it close to the appropriate weight. Around the end of the 3rd century CE, local standards were replaced entirely by the Roman system and the descriptive word Iταλικη was no longer necessary.
AS96251. Corpus Inscriptionum Iudaeae/Palaestinae, Vol. II, p. 621 (nearly identical specimen from the same mold), VF, roughly oval shape, probably missing handle at the top, weight 153.5 g, maximum diameter 87x43 mm, obverse ITA/ΛIK/H H/MI Λ/ITPA (half an Italian litra) in six lines; reverse blank; from The Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection; surface find 1974 Caesarea Maritima; very rare; $600.00 SALE |PRICE| $480.00


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

|Phoenicia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Tyre,| |Phoenicia||dichalkon|
Romans refounded Tyre as a colony in 64 B.C., when Pompey annexed Phoenicia to the Roman Empire. Tyre flourished under the Rome and remained a Roman port city, even under the Byzantine Empire, until the 7th century when it was taken by Muslim conquest.
RP96396. Bronze dichalkon, BMC Phoenicia p. 289, 465 var. (murex shell on right); Rouvier -; Baramki AUB -; SNG Hunt -; SNG Cop -, F, rough dark green patina, earthen deposits, weight 16.345 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, Oct 253 - Jun 260 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG, laureate bust right; reverse COL TVRO METR, river-god (Adonis?) standing facing, head left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right hand dropping incense on flaming altar at her feet on left, long grounded reed vertical in left hand, murex shell on left; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, 1971 Caesarea Maritima surface find; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $400.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Judaea Under Agrippa II

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Judaea| |Under| |Agrippa| |II||AE| |14|
This Judaea Capta type was minted at Caesarea Maritima, Judaea. Caesarea, built by Herod the Great about 25 - 13 B.C., was named to flatter Augustus Caesar. It became the capital of Iudaea Province and the residence of the Roman procurators and governors including Pontius Pilatus, praefectus and Antonius Felix. In 66 A.D., the desecration of the local synagogue led to the disastrous Jewish revolt. After the revolt was suppressed, 2500 Jewish captives were slaughtered at Caesarea in Gladiatorial games held by Titus to celebrate his victory. Today, Caesarea's ruins lie on Israel's Mediterranean coast about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of Pyrgos Stratonos ("Straton's Tower").
RP96395. Bronze AE 14, RPC Online II 2303 (5 spec.); Hendin 1453; Carradice INJ pl. 3, 22; Kadman -; BMC Palestine -; SNG Cop -, aF, rough dark green patina, light encrustations, weight 1.739 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 180o, Caesarea Maritima mint, struck under Agrippa II, c. 81 - 82 A.D.; obverse DOMITIANVS CAESAR DIVI F AV, laureate head right; reverse rudder, no inscription; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection; rare; $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00


Judaea, Marcus Ambibulus, Roman Prefect under Augustus, 9 - 12 A.D.

|Marcus| |Ambibulus|, |Judaea,| |Marcus| |Ambibulus,| |Roman| |Prefect| |under| |Augustus,| |9| |-| |12| |A.D.||prutah|
Marcus Ambibulus was Roman Prefect of the province of Judea and Samaria. Originally a cavalry officer, he succeeded Coponius in 9 A.D. and ruled the area until 12 or 13 A.D. when he was succeeded by Annius Rufus. Josephus noted his tenure in Jewish Antiquities 18.31.
JD96398. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1331, Meshorer TJC 315, RPC I 4957, aVF, dark patina, uneven strike, minor encrustations, weight 2.130 g, maximum diameter 17.10 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 11 - 12 A.D.; obverse KAICAPOC (of Caesar), barley head curved to right; reverse eight-branched date palm tree, bearing two bunches of dates, L - M[A] (year 41 of Augustus) divided across lower field; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Licinius Junior, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |II|, |Licinius| |Junior,| |Caesar,| |1| |March| |317| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL96401. Billon follis, Hunter V 52 (also 7th officina), RIC VII Antioch 36 (R3), SRCV IV 15410, Cohen VII 21, gF, brown tone, porous, light corrosion, weight 3.940 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 321 - 323 A.D.; obverse D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, shield in left hand and spear in right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing facing, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulder, Victory on globe offering wreath in his right hand, eagle-topped scepter vertical in left, eagle with wreath in beak on left, X/IIΓ (12 1/2) on right above bearded captive at feet seated right with head turned looking back at Jupiter, SMANTZ in exergue; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, purchased in Israel, 1970's; $85.00 SALE |PRICE| $76.50


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Virtus is the personification of valor and courage. Valor was, of course, essential for the success of a Roman emperor and Virtus was one of the embodiments of virtues that were part of the Imperial cult. During his joint reign with his father, Gallienus proved his courage in battle; but his failure to liberate his father from Persian captivity was perceived as cowardice and a disgrace to the Emperor and Empire. It was not, however, actually fear that prevented a rescue. While others mourned Valerian's fate, Gallienus rejoiced in his new sovereignty.
RA96400. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1617i, RIC V-1 S668, SRCV III 10402, RSC IV 1237b corr. (bust not cuirassed), VF, well centered, dark toning, some legend weak, holed, closed crack from hole to edge, weight 4.121 g, maximum diameter 22.66 mm, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Virtus standing left, helmeted and wearing military garb, resting right hand on shield set on ground, spear with point up in left, star in exergue; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection, purchased in Israel, 1971; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES




Caesarea began as Straton's Tower, a small naval station founded by the king of Sidon, c. 360 B.C. Alexander Jannaeus captured it in 90 B.C. The Romans declared it an autonomous city in 63 B.C.

Herod renamed the the pagan city Caesarea in honor of Caesar Augustus. He built there one of the most impressive harbors of its time, storerooms, markets, roads, baths, temples, public buildings and a palace. When Judea became a Roman province in 6 A.D., Caesarea Maritima replaced Jerusalem as its capital and was the residence of governors, including the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate.

It was at Caesarea that Peter baptized Cornelius the Centurion, the first Christian baptism of Gentiles. Paul visited Caesarea several times and was a prisoner there for two years before being sent to Rome. In 70 A.D., after the Jewish Revolt was suppressed, about 2,500 Jewish captives lost their lives in gladiatorial games at Caesarea.

Caesarea became the capital of Byzantine Palaestina Prima in 390. It fell to Sassanid Persia in in 614, was re-conquered by Byzantium in 625, then lost for good by the Byzantines to the Muslim conquest in 640. The population fell and the harbor silted up and was unusable by the 9th century.

By 1047 the town was redeveloped, when Nasir-i-Khusraw described it as, "a fine city, with running waters, and palm-gardens, and orange and citron trees. Its walls are strong, and it has an iron gate."Caesarea was taken by Baldwin I in the First Crusade, in 1101. Saladin retook the city in 1187, but it was recaptured by the Europeans during the Third Crusade in 1191. In 1265, the Mamluks destroyed it completely to prevent its re-emergence as a Crusader stronghold.

In 1952, a Jewish town of Caesarea was established near the ruins. The ruins of the ancient city, on the coast about 2 km south of modern Caesarea, were excavated in the 1950s and 1960s and the site was incorporated into the new Caesarea National Park in 2011.

Catalog current as of Thursday, October 22, 2020.
Page created in 0.766 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity