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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Other Gods||View Options:  |  |  | 

Other Gods
Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||drachm|
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
JD99500. Silver drachm, Meshorer-Qedar 30; Samuels 6; Mildenberg Bes pl. 1, 5; Sofaer -; SNG ANS -; Hendin -; HGC 10 -, VF, centered, toned, edge split, a little rough, weight 2.565 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse horned head of creature facing (griffin?) within square guilloche-pattern border; reverse winged and horned griffin recumbent right, Aramaic dalat (for Delayah?) above left, square guilloche-pattern border, all within an incuse square; extremely rare; $3850.00 SALE PRICE $3465.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |19|
Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
JD111088. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 4002 (9 spec.); Sofaer 123; SNG ANS 714; De Saulcy 3; Rosenberger 151; Yashin 176; BMC Palestine -, F, toned, porous, a little off center, weight 6.283 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 118 - 119 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC (clockwise on right), laureate head right; reverse ACKA-ΛΩ, war-god Phanebal standing left, wearing helmet, harpa in raised right hand, small round shield on left arm, long palm frond in left hand, BKC (year 222) lower right; zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |18|
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
JD111092. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online II 2216; SNG Cop 36; SNG ANS 700; SNG Righetti 2460; BMC Palestine p. 123, 132; Lindgren 2458; Rosenberger 118; Sofaer 85, Choice F, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 5.622 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse CEBAC (caesar) downward before, laureate head left; reverse Phanebal (war god of Ascalon) standing facing, wearing military dress, raising sword above head in right hand, shield and palm frond in left hand, HP (year 198 of the Ascalon Era) downward on left, AC (Ascalon) upward on right; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Isinda, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Isinda,| |Pisidia||assarion|
Isinda stood in a strategic position at the western end of the pass leading from Pamphylia by Termessus to Pisidia. The coinage of Isinda indicates the city considered itself an Ionian colony.
RP97734. Bronze assarion, SNG BnF 1622; SNG Pfalz 234; BMC Lycia p. 227, 21; SNG Hunterian -; SNGvA -; SNG Cop -, aVF, dark brown patina, weight 8.444 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Isinda (Kisla, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AK ΠΛ OVAΛEPIANON CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ICIN-Δ-EΩN, mother goddess seated right on a high backed throne, holding swaddled infant on her lap, coiled serpent rising up before her; ex Numismatica Ars Classica Auction 100 (29 May 2017), lot 1320; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia, Judaea

|Roman| |Judea| |&| |Palestina|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.,| |Ascalon,| |Philistia,| |Judaea||AE| |18|
The Philistines conquered Canaanite Ashkelon about 1150 B.C. and it became one of the five Philistine cities that were constantly warring with the Israelites and the Kingdom of Judah. The last of the Philistine cities to hold out against Nebuchadnezzar, it finally fell in 604 B.C.; burned and destroyed, its people exiled, the Philistine era ended. Ashkelon was rebuilt, dominated by Persian culture. After the Alexander's conquest, Ashkelon was an important Hellenistic seaport. The Jews drove the Greeks out of the region during the Maccabean Revolt, which lasted from 167 to 160 B.C. In 63 B.C. the area was incorporated into the Roman Republic. Cleopatra VII used Ashkelon as her refuge when her brother and sister exiled her in 49 B.C. The city remained loyal to Rome during the First Jewish Revolt.
RP110556. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online II 2213; Sofaer 82; Rosenberger 116; BMC Palestine p. 122, 129; SNG ANS -, aVF, bare toned metal, reverse a little off center, weight 5.763 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 85 - 86 A.D.; obverse laureate head left, CE (caesar) downward on left; reverse Phanebal (war god of Ascalon) standing facing, wearing military dress, raising sword above head in right hand, shield and palm frond in left hand, ΘΠΡ (year 189 of the Ascalon Era) downward on left, AC (Ascalon) upward on right; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00







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