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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Success||View Options:  |  |  |   

Success (Bonus Eventus)

Bonus Eventus (the God of Success) was worshipped by the Romans among the other Dei Consentes, as a diety especially presiding over agriculture.


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS87613. Silver denarius, unpublished variety; RIC II 208(a) var. (no slight drapery), RSC II 640a var. (same), BMCRE III 542 var. (same), Strack 334, SRCV II -, Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, bumps and scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.265 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas seated left, cornucopia in right, caduceus in left, COS III P P (consul three times, father of the country) in exergue; extremely rare variant - this is the only example of this bust variety for this type known to Forum; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS57075. Silver denarius, RIC IV 369 var., RSC III 68 var. (engraver's error: the obverse legend is lacking the L), gVF, weight 2.731 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE [L] SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
SH66202. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 563b, BMCRE III 1153, Cohen II 1192, SRCV II 3623, VF, magnificent bust, fine style, light corrosion, weight 26.681 g, maximum diameter 33.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust right, bare chest, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse PONT MAX TR POT COS III (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 3rd time), Felicitas standing slightly left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; big 33 mm bronze!, ex Kenneth Edwin Day Collection; SOLD


Roman Republic, Lucius Scribonius Libo, c. 62 B.C.

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The ruins of the Puteal Scribonianum were discovered in the Forum in 1950's. The reverse is either a play on Scribonius' name or the origin of his family name and the Scribonianum were related. Perhaps he was also a music lover explaining the lyres. The same type was also minted with an anvil or tongs in place of the hammer. Sear indicates the tools are symbolic of the moneyer's position. -- Roman Coins and Their Values by David R. Sear

Crawford believes the lyres may be purely decorative and the tools, symbols of Vulcan, recall that the Puteal was located on a spot that was struck by lightning. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
SH81829. Silver denarius, Crawford 416/1a, Sydenham 928, RSC I Scribonia 8a, BMCRR I Rome 3377, RBW Collection 1500, SRCV I 367, aEF, toned, tight flan, reverse slightly off center, weight 4.022 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 62 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Bonus Eventus right, BON EVENT downward before, LIBO downward behind; reverse PVTEAL SCRIBON, Puteal Scribonianum, ornamented with garland and two lyres, hammer at base, PVTEAL above, SCRIBON in exergue; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS67081. Silver denarius, RIC IV S608, RSC III 10, F, well centered, weight 3.256 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 195 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind; reverse BONI EVENTVS (S modified from C), Bonus Eventus standing left, plate of fruit raised in right hand, two stalks of grain downward at side in left; rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS90498. Silver denarius, BMCRE V 321, RIC IV 347, RSC III 66, cf. SRCV II 6267 (Emesa), aVF, toned, weight 2.620 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, Feb - Aug 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, stalks of grain downward at side in left; rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS90501. Silver denarius, RIC IV 347 (R); BMCRE V p. 83, 321; RSC III 66; cf. SRCV II 6267 (Emesa), aVF, archetypal exotic Alexandrian style, tight flan, weight 2.715 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, Feb - Aug 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, stalks of grain downward at side in left; rare; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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A very rare early obverse legend variety combined with an unusual error reverse EVENTVC for EVENTVS.
RS24461. Silver denarius, SGCV II 6267 var., RIC IV -, RSC III -, BMCRE V -, VF+, weight 2.377 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CE L SEP SEV PERT AVG ē CO, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVC, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; very rare; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS64545. Silver denarius, RIC IV S616, RSC III 10, BMCRE V * p. 102, cites Cohen, SRCV II -, VF/F, weight 3.228 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 195 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind; reverse BONI EVENTVS (S modified from C), Bonus Eventus standing left, plate of fruit raised in right hand, two stalks of grain downward at side in left; rare; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS85760. Silver denarius, RSC II 602, BMCRE III 604, RIC II 233, Strack II 230, SRCV I -, gVF, nice style, corrosion, scrapes, scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.168 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas (happiness) standing half left, caduceus (symbol of peace) in right hand, cornucopia (symbol of abundance) in left hand; SOLD




  




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