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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Silver Under $100||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

On this page we list every silver coin in the shop priced under $100. If you are a serious bargain hunter, change the sort order using the options on the upper right side of the page to arrange the coins from lowest price to highest.

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
During Philip's reign the 1000th anniversary of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated, and magnificent games were held. This coin was issued as part of that celebration and the reverse depicts a cippus probably erected to commemorate the games or thank Philip. The cippus is present on the coins of Otacilia as well but without a legend.
RS95367. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 193, RIC IV 24c, Hunter III 50, SRCV III 8961, aVF, dark toning, centered, weight 3.057 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SAECVLARES AVGG (Secular games [provided by] the Emperors), cippus inscribed COS III; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $104.00 ON RESERVE


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, c. 96 - 63 B.C.

|Cappadocian| |Kingdom|, |Cappadocian| |Kingdom,| |Ariobarzanes| |I| |Philoromaios,| |c.| |96| |-| |63| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87950. Silver drachm, Simonetta Collection 9, Simonetta 6, SNG Cop 927, SNG Berry 1326, Cohen DCA 460 (94/93 B.C.), HGC 7 846, BMC Galatia -, VF/F, well centered, toned, bumps and scratches, weight 4.146 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 93 - 92 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ API•BAPZAN•Y ΦIΛ•PΩMAI•Y (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros standing left, Nike extending wreath in right hand, left hand on grounded shield and spear, monogram inner left, monogram inner right, Γ (year 3) in exergue; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00 ON RESERVE


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, 96 - 63 B.C.

|Cappadocian| |Kingdom|, |Cappadocian| |Kingdom,| |Ariobarzanes| |I| |Philoromaios,| |96| |-| |63| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS87952. Silver drachm, Simonetta 13a; Simonetta Collection 21b; SNGvA 6319; SNG Cop 149; Cohen DCA 460 (84/83 B.C.); HGC 7 846; BMC Cappadocia -, VF, toned, well centered, light marks, weight 4.108 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Mazaka-Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 83 - 82 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIOBAPZANOY ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY (King Ariobarzanes, friend of the Romans), Athena Nikephoros standing left, Nike crowning name with wreath in Athena's right hand, left hand on grounded shield and spear behind, monogram inner left, IΓ (year 13) in exergue; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00
 


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, 450 - 425 B.C.

|Apollonia| |Pontica|, |Apollonia| |Pontika,| |Thrace,| |450| |-| |425| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Homer wrote about the Gorgon on four occasions, but only about the head, as if the creature had no body. Up to the 5th century B.C., the head depicted was very ugly, with her tongue sticking out, boar tusks, puffy cheeks, her eyeballs staring straight ahead and the snakes twisting all around her. The direct frontal stare was highly unusual in ancient Greek art. In some cases a beard, (probably representing streaks of blood) was added to her chin, making her appear as a wild. Gorgoneia painted on the shields of warriors on mid-5th century Greek vases, however, are not as ugly, strange or frightening. By that time, the Gorgon had lost her tusks and the snakes were rather stylized. The Hellenistic marble known as the Medusa Rondanini shows how the Gorgon changed over time into a beautiful woman..Medusa Rondanini
GS91770. Silver drachm, Topalov Apollonia II p. 588, 44; SNG BM 159; HGC 3.2 1324; SNG Stancomb -, SNG Cop -, VF, off center, grainy, porous, weight 3.226 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 180o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, 450 - 425 B.C.; obverse gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), round face, protruding tongue, straight human hair, wearing taenia, with snakes around, in shallow round incuse; reverse inverted anchor, large flukes, A left, crayfish right, round slight incuse; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00 ON RESERVE


Divo Valerian II, Caesar, Early 256 - 258 A.D., Consecration Issue

|Valerian| |II|, |Divo| |Valerian| |II,| |Caesar,| |Early| |256| |-| |258| |A.D.,| |Consecration| |Issue|, |antoninianus|
Valerian II was son of Gallienus and Salonina, Grandson of Valerian I and Mariniana. He was raised to the rank of Caesar upon his father's accession but died only two years later.
RS93323. Silver antoninianus, Göbl MIR 911e, SRCV III 10606, RIC V-1 9 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 5, Hunter IV 7, VF, well centered on a tight flan, light toning, light cleaning scratches, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 2.676 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 135o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) mint, posthumous, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse CONSECRATIO, Valerian II carried into the heavens seated on eagle flying right, waiving his right hand, scepter in his left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00
 


Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

|Chersonesos|, |Chersonesos,| |Thrace,| |c.| |400| |-| |338| |B.C.|, |hemidrachm|
Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GA89369. Silver hemidrachm, McClean II 4079; BMC Thrace p. 183, 11; SNG Ashmolean 3589; Weber 2419; HGC 3.2 1437; SNG Cop -, VF, toned, attractive lion, light marks, tight flan, edge crack, weight 2.292 g, maximum diameter 12.7 mm, Cherronesos (Gallipoli peninsula) mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in one sunken quarter, bunch of grapes in the opposite sunken quarter; ex FORVM (2011), ex Mediterranean Coins; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00 ON RESERVE


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia|, |didrachm|
Mount Erciyes (Argaios to the Greeks, Argaeus to the Romans) is a massive stratovolcano 25 km to the south of Kayseri (ancient Caesarea) in Turkey. The highest mountain in central Anatolia, with its summit reaching 3,916 meters (12,848 ft). It may have erupted as recently as 253 B.C., as may be depicted on Roman era coins. Strabo wrote that the summit was never free from snow and that those few who ascended it reported seeing both the Black Sea to the north and the Mediterranean Sea to the south in days with a clear sky.
RP87685. Silver didrachm, cf. RPC IV Online 10073; Metcalf Cappadocia 146a; SNGvA 6441; SNG Cop 250 var. (legends); Sydenham Cappadocia Supp. 370a var. (same); BMC Galatia -, aVF, frosty porous surfaces, bumps and marks, tine edge split, reverse legend ending in exergue is obscure, weight 3.343 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, COS III, 181 - 182 A.D.; obverse AYT M AYPH KOMO - ANTΩNINOC C, laureate head right; reverse UΠATOC Γ - ΠAT ΠA-[TP...(?)], Mount Argaios with rocks and trees, surmounted by Helios standing left on summit, globe in his right hand, long scepter in left hand; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Julia Maesa, Augusta 8 June 218 - 224 or 225 A.D., Grandmother of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander

|Julia| |Maesa|, |Julia| |Maesa,| |Augusta| |8| |June| |218| |-| |224| |or| |225| |A.D.,| |Grandmother| |of| |Elagabalus| |and| |Severus| |Alexander|, |denarius|
Juno was the protector and special counselor of the state. She was a daughter of Saturn, and sister and wife of Jupiter and the mother of Juventas, Mars, and Vulcan. Her Greek equivalent is Hera.
RS92498. Silver denarius, RIC IV 254, RSC III 16, BMCRE V 67, Hunter III 4, SRCV II 7750, VF, old cabinet toning, full legends, porous, edge cracks, weight 2.888 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 218 - 220 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAESA AVG, draped bust right, hair in nearly vertical waves, looped plait at back; reverse IVNO, Juno standing slightly left, veiled head left, patera in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 340 - 325 B.C.

|Ephesos|, |Ephesos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |340| |-| |325| |B.C.|, |hemidrachm|
In 356 B.C. the temple of Artemis was burned down, according to legend, by a lunatic called Herostratus. Ephesus planned a larger, grander temple and at once started rebuilding. When Alexander the Great defeated the Persian forces at the Battle of Granicus in 334 B.C., the Greek cities of Anatolia were liberated. The pro-Persian tyrant Syrpax and his family were stoned to death, and Alexander was greeted warmly when he entered Ephesus in triumph. When Alexander saw that the temple of Artemis was not yet finished, he proposed to finance it and have his name inscribed on the front. But the Ephesians demurred, saying it was not fitting for one god to build a temple to another.
GS94111. Silver hemidrachm, Karwiese Series VI, SNG Kayhan 247, SNG Keckman II 210, SNG Lockett 2806, SNG Munchen 22, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Tub -, F, dark tone, light corrosion, die wear and cracks, tiny edge crack, weight 1.468 g, maximum diameter 12.1 mm, Ephesos mint, c. 340 - 325 B.C.; obverse bee with straight wings seen from above, E−Φ flanking head; reverse quadripartite incuse square, divided by thin raised bands, incuse quarters rough; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Not in RIC. The normal obverse legend for combined with this reverse type and legend is IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P. This coin is missing HADR. For this variety, only four sales in the last two decades are recorded on Coin Archives.
RS94123. Silver denarius, RSC II 825c, BMCRE IV 736 note, Strack III 228, RIC III 202b (S) var. (obv. legend), SRCV II 4108 var. (obv. legend), Choice F, nice portrait, well centered, toned, die wear, edge a bit ragged with small cracks, weight 2.996 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 151 - 152 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES T AEL ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XIIII COS IIII, Tranquillitas standing right, rudder in right hand, stalks of grain downward in left, TRANQ in exergue; very rare; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 




  



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