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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Arabia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Arabia
Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck for Use in Roman Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Struck| |for| |Use| |in| |Roman| |Arabia||tridrachm|
This type was previously attributed to Caesarea, Cappadocia, but the Tell Kalak hoard and a lack of finds in Cappadocia indicate the type circulated in Arabia. Slightly more than two-thirds silver, the composition of this type is identical to contemporary Syrian tetradrachms. The weight indicates they are tridrachms, but there is no consensus as to the denomination. Sydenham and Kindler refer to them as tridrachms, McAlee as light tetradrachms, and Butcher as tetradrachms. The type has no iconographic link with Arabia and Arabian drachms are considerably more debased, typically at a 50:50 ratio of silver to bronze. RPC III notes they may have been struck in Rome for circulation in Arabia, or at least, the dies were made in Rome.
RS97644. Silver tridrachm, RPC III 4071 (23 spec.); Henseler 267; Sydenham Caesarea 190a; SNG ANS 1161 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 55, 74 (Caesarea), VF, superb "Roman" dies portrait, toned, flow lines, light bumps and scratches, reverse slightly off center, edge splits, weight 10.347 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra(?) mint, 112 - 114 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate and draped bust right, seen from slightly behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOC (holder of Tribunitian power, consul), distyle temple, podium of four steps, cult image of Artemis of Perge within, eagle standing on pediment with head left and wings open; scarce; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |22|NEW
Excavations have demonstrated that it was the ability of the Nabataeans to control the water supply that led to the rise of the desert city, creating an artificial oasis. The area was subject to flash floods, but archaeological evidence shows that the Nabataeans controlled these floods by the use of dams, cisterns and water conduits. These innovations stored this flood water for prolonged periods of drought and enabled the city to prosper in the desert.The Decapolis
RY94935. Bronze AE 22, cf. Sofaer 30; Rosenberger 22; Spijkerman 27; BMC Arabia, p. 36, 15; SNG ANS -, VF, nice portrait, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, weight 8.416 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AY K Λ CEΠ - CEOVH CE (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PIA ΠETP-A MHTROΠOΛ (or similar), Tyche seated left on rocks, wearing turreted crown, right hand extended and holding stele, trophy over shoulder in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00
 


Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217, Rabbathmoba, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta,| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217,| |Rabbathmoba,| |Arabia||AE| |31|
Rabbathmoba (also called Areopolis or Aresopolis), on the Karak plateau, was probably the Biblical Ir-Moab conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan. Rabbath-Moba minted coins during the reigns of the Severan emperors between 193 and 222 A.D.
RY94929. Bronze AE 31, Sofaer 10 (same dies); cf. Spijkerman p. 268, 18 (dated PE); Meshorer City Coins 271; SNG ANS -; Rosenberger IV -, F, dark green patina, scratches, pit on reverse, irregular flan edge, weight 14.582 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rabbathmoba (near Kerak, Jordan) mint, c. 210 - 211 A.D.; obverse IOYΛIA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse PABBAΘMΩBA, cult statue of Ares standing facing in military dress on a high base with pilasters, short sword erect in right hand, spear and round shield in left hand, base flanked on each side by a flaming altar, no date; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Rabbathmoba-Areopolis, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Rabbathmoba-Areopolis,| |Arabia||AE| |29|
Rabbathmoba (also called Areopolis or Aresopolis), on the Karak plateau, was probably the Biblical Ir-Moab conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan. Rabbath-Moba minted coins during the reigns of the Severan emperors between 193 and 222 A.D.
RY94932. Bronze AE 29, apparently unpublished; Sofaer 7 - 8 var. (obv. legend), SNG ANS 1413 var. (same); Spijkerman p. 265, 14 - 16 var. (same); Rosenberger IV -, F, green patina with highlighting orange earthen deposits, scratches, tight squared flan, weight 13.613 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rabbathmoba (near Kerak, Jordan) mint, 209 - 210 A.D.; obverse AYT K Λ CEΠ CEOVHPOC CEBACTO, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse PABAΘMOUBHNWN TUCH, Tyche standing right, wearing mural crown, her right foot on a river god, long scepter vertical in right hand, small bust in left hand, P-∆ ([year] 104 [of Roman rule]) divided across field; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|NEW
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94893. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman pl. 51, 43a (same dies), cf. Sofaer 45 (normal style, legends), BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, SNG Hunterian -, Rosenberger IV -, aVF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, barbaric style and epigraphy, weak incomplete legends, weight 10.894 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse ANTEINO M AVP - AVTOKRATO (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, barbaric style; reverse MHTPOΠO A∆P ΠETPO (or similar), Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, extending right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, barbaric style; from the Ray Nouri Collection; very rare; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |24|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94944. Bronze AE 24, Sofaer 45, Spijkerman 42; Rosenberger IV -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Arabia -, aF, near black patina, orange earthen fill, weight 7.676 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse K M AVP ANTWN CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHT, Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, wearing turreted crown, extending right hand, trophy in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |22|NEW
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94952. Bronze AE 22, cf. Sofaer 53, Spijkerman 56, Rosenberger IV 35, SNG ANS 1373 ff., SNG Cop 150, SNG Righetti 2548, BMC Arabia -, aVF, broad flan for the type, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 7.689 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVP ANTONINI, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse emperor ceremonially plowing right with a cow and an ox, marking the pomerium (sacred boundary) to found the new colony, togate, right hand raised, PETΛΛ above, COLONΛ in exergue but the final letter in the lower right field; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $110.00 (€90.20) ON RESERVE


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
From the Ray Nouri Collection.

This type is traditionally assigned to Antioch but McAlee identifies Laodicea as the most likely mint. McAlee notes, "After Septimius stripped Antioch of its privileges and conferred them on Laodicea-ad-Mare, some coins of Laodicea bear the legend 'Metropolis of the Four Provinces,' and others have a representation of four Tyches. The letters ∆ - E also regularly appear on the coins of Laodicea from the time of Elagabalus to that of Trebonianus Gallus." We attribute the type to Antioch, but clearly that is not certain.
RY94937. Billon tetradrachm, Bellinger Syria 42, SNG Cop 236, McAlee 758, Prieur 249 var. (both ties behind neck), Dura Coins -, F, toned, tight flan cutting off part of legends, reverse legend weak, weight 12.920 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 219 A.D.; obverse AVT K M A ANTWNEINOC CEB, laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, one wreath tie on neck; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC YΠ B (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the second time), eagle standing facing, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak, ∆ - E (∆ EΠAPCEIΩN - of the four eparchies) flanking eagle's head, star between legs; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |22|NEW
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94931. Bronze AE 22, Sofaer 30 (same dies); Rosenberger 22 (same dies); Spijkerman 27 var. (legends); BMC Arabia, p. 36, 15 var. (legends, left hand empty); SNG ANS -, gF, well centered on a tight flan cutting off parts of legends, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 7.224 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse K Λ CEΠ - CEOVH CE, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; c/m on neck: ∆(?); reverse A∆PIA • ΠE-TPA MHTROΠOΛIC, Tyche seated left on rock, right hand extended and holding small stele, trophy of arms over shoulder in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|
Excavations have demonstrated that it was the ability of the Nabataeans to control the water supply that led to the rise of the desert city, creating an artificial oasis. The area was subject to flash floods, but archaeological evidence shows that the Nabataeans controlled these floods by the use of dams, cisterns and water conduits. These innovations stored this flood water for prolonged periods of drought and enabled the city to prosper in the desert.The Decapolis
RY94940. Bronze AE 23, cf. SNG ANS 1369, Sofaer 14, Spijkerman 34, Rosenberger IV 21, BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, Lindgren -, F, dark green patina with earthen deposit highlighting, scratches, weight 6.896 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV K Λ CEΠT CEOVHPOC (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHTP (or similar), Tyche seated left on rocks inside distyle temple, stele extended in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 




  



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REFERENCES

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