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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Sicily| ▸ |Akragas||View Options:  |  |  | 

Akragas, Sicily

Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.

Akragas, Sicily, c. 450 - 440 B.C.

|Akragas|, |Akragas,| |Sicily,| |c.| |450| |-| |440| |B.C.||tetras|NEW
Located on a plateau overlooking Sicily's southern coast, Akragas was founded c. 582 B.C. by colonists from Gela. It grew rapidly, becoming second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by Carthage in 406 B.C. and never fully recovered. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GI98095. Cast bronze tetras, Westermark 1979 2; Westermark Akragas 526; Calciati I p. 145, 6; SNG ANS 1018; HGC 2 127 (R1), aF, dark green patina, 9.004g, 16.9mm long, weight 9.004 g, maximum diameter 17.25 mm, die axis 0o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 450 - 440 B.C.; cast somewhat tooth-shaped flattened cone form, three pellets (mark of value) arranged in a triangle on flat top, heads and necks of two eagles back-to-back facing outwards on one side, crab opposite; rare; $200.00 (182.00)


Akragas, Sicily, c. 495 - 482 B.C.

|Akragas|, |Akragas,| |Sicily,| |c.| |495| |-| |482| |B.C.||didrachm|
Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
SH35526. Silver didrachm, cf. Jenkins III; SNG ANS 940; SNG Cop 27; SNG Munchen 43, gVF, struck with dies engraved in the finest style for this archaic type, weight 8.810 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 255o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 495 - 482 B.C.; obverse AKPAΓ/AΣ, eagle standing left; reverse crab in incuse convex round; SOLD


Akragas, Sicily, c. 510 - 472 B.C.

|Akragas|, |Akragas,| |Sicily,| |c.| |510| |-| |472| |B.C.||didrachm|
Akragas was founded early in the 6th century by colonists from Gela. It was second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 B.C. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GS21673. Silver didrachm, SNG ANS 950, gVF, weight 8.614 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 270o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 510 - 472 B.C.; obverse AK/RA, eagle standing right, wings closed; reverse crab viewed from above, within deep round incuse; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Bloesch, H. Griechische Mnzen In Winterthur, Vol. 1. Spain, Gaul, Italy, Sicily, Moesia, Dacia, Sarmatia, Thrace, and Macedonia. (Winterthur, 1987).
Calciati, R. Corpus Nummorum Siculorum, The Bronze Coinage, Vol. I. (Milan, 1983).
Gabrici, E. La monetazione del bronzo nella Sicila antica. (Palermo, 1927).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. I: Western Europe, Magna Graecia, Sicily. (Cambridge, 1923).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Jameson, R. Collection R. Jameson, Monnaies grecques antiques et Imperiales Romaines. (Paris, 1913-1932).
Jenkins, K. Coins of Greek Sicily. (New York, 1976).
Poole, R., ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Sicily. (London, 1876).
Rizzo, G. Monete greche della Sicilia. (Rome, 1946).
Salinas, A. Le monete delle antiche citt di Sicilia descritte e illustrate da Antonino Salinas. (Palermo, 1871).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Seltman, C. "The Engravers of the Akragantine Decadrachms" in NC 1948.
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 1: Italy - Sicily. (West Milford, NJ, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part 5: Sikelia. (Berlin, 1977).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnzsammlung Universitt Tbingen, Part 1: Hispania-Sikelia. (Berlin, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain II, Lloyd Collection, Vol. V - VI: Galaria to Selinus. (London, 1935).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 2: Sicily - Thrace (gold and silver). (London, 1939).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 2: Sicily - Thrace. (London, 1947).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain X, John Morcom Collection. (Oxford, 1995).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 3: Bruttium - Sicily 1 (Abacaenum - Eryx). (New York, 1975).
Thurlow, B. & I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).
Westermark, U. The Coinage of Akragas, c. 510-406 BC. (Uppsala, Sweden, 2018).
Westermark, U. "The Fifth Century Bronze Coinage of Akragas" in CCISN 6 (Rome, 1979).

Catalog current as of Monday, May 16, 2022.
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