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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Mints| ▸ |Other Byzantine Mints||View Options:  |  |  | 

Other and Uncertain Byzantine Mints

At least 15 Byzantine mints were operational during Justinian's long reign and re-conquests of Italy, Spain and North Africa, including new mints at Constantine in Numidia, Perugia in Umbria, Salona in Dalmatia, and Carthagena in Spain. Alexandretta (Iskenderun, Turkey today) was used as a mint by Heraclius during his revolt against Phocas (609 - 610) but was closed once he controlled Constantinople. Jerusalem opened briefly about 609 - 615. Heraclius also opened Seleucia, Isaura and Constantia in Cyprus. Constans II (641 - 668) opened a mint at Naples. Carthagena fell to the Visagoths about 620 and although some new mints opened in the following centuries the tide had turned against the empire. Later mints included Sardina, Magnesia, and possibly Philippopolis, and Corinth.

Byzantine Empire, Theme of Chaldia (Trebizond), Constantine Gabras, c. 1126 - 1140 A.D.

|Empire| |of| |Trebizond|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Theme| |of| |Chaldia| |(Trebizond),| |Constantine| |Gabras,| |c.| |1126| |-| |1140| |A.D.||follis|
Constantine Gabras (or Gavras) was the governor or doux (duke) of the Byzantine province of Chaldia, centered on the Black Sea port of Trebizond and its mountainous hinterland, the Pontic Alps, in northeast Anatolia, now part of Turkey. Gabras rebelled against the Byzantine emperor John II Komnenos and ruled Chaldia as a semi-independent prince between 1126 and 1140. Following the dissolution of the Byzantine Empire by the Fourth Crusade in 1204, the region became the center of the new Empire of Trebizond which survived until falling to the Ottomans in 1461.
BZ95865. Bronze follis, Bendall Trebizond (NC 77), pl. 7, 28; DOC IV Trebizond p. 433, 14; Hendy -; SBCV -, F, uneven strike with some weak areas, reverse off center, earthen encrustations, weight 1.146 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Trebizond (Trabzon, Turkey) mint, c. 1126 - 1140 A.D.; obverse cross fourche within circular border; reverse cross fourche within circular border; rare; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Empire of Nicaea, John III Ducas-Vatatzes, c. 15 December 1221 - 3 November 1254

|John| |III|, |Empire| |of| |Nicaea,| |John| |III| |Ducas-Vatatzes,| |c.| |15| |December| |1221| |-| |3| |November| |1254||tetarteron|
John was a very successful ruler who greatly increased the size, influence, and prosperity of the Nicaean Empire. He prepared the way for his descendants to successfully restore Greek rule to Constantinople and to rule the restored Byzantine Empire.
BZ99291. Bronze tetarteron, DOC IV-2 57, Wroth BMC 32, Hendy pl. 34, 3, SBCV 2115, Ratto -, Sommer -, aVF, weight 1.974 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Lydia, Magnesia ad Sipylum (Manisa, Turkey) mint, c. 15 Dec 1221 - 3 Nov 1254; obverse head of cherub with four wings, pellets flanking on left and right; reverse IWO - ∆PK (or similar), John seated facing on throne with back, wearing stemma with pendilia, chlamys and divitision, holding labarum and globus cruciger; ex Forum (2016); rare; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Byzantine Empire, Alexius I, 4 April 1081 - 15 August 1118 A.D.

|Alexius| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Alexius| |I,| |4| |April| |1081| |-| |15| |August| |1118| |A.D.||tetarteron|
According to CLBC I the weight of this type varies from 0.59 to 3.22 grams, with an average diameter of 18mm. Some examples are so small and light that it appears they could be half tetarteron. Despite the unusual variation in flan size, Marchev and Watcher note they were all struck with the same size dies and all examples are probably tetarteron.
BZ92379. Bronze tetarteron, Hendy p. 89 & p. 8, 14; DOC IV part 1, 45b; CLBC I 2.4.8; Ratto 2087; Grierson 1063; Sommer 59.27; SBCV 1932, VF, centered on a tight flan, earthen encrustation, areas of corrosion, weight 1.113 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Greek mint, 1092 - 1118 A.D.; obverse patriarchal cross on two steps, A − A / K − Φ (or similar) flanking in two divided lines across field; reverse AΛE-ZI (or similar), bust facing wearing crown, stemma, divitision, and jeweled loros, jeweled scepter in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand; SOLD







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