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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Mints| ▸ |Carthage||View Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Carthage (c. 533 - 695)

The Carthage mint reopened in 533 or 534 after Justinian's conquests. Carthage was lost to the Arabs, c 695.

Carthage, Punic Sardinia, c. 216 - 215 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthage,| |Punic| |Sardinia,| |c.| |216| |-| |215| |B.C.||AE| |18|
This scarce type was issued by Carthaginian forces that landed on Roman ruled Sardinia during the 2nd Punic War. Soon after the start of the Second Punic War between Carthage and Rome, fought from 218 to 201 B.C., the Carthaginian general Hannibal marched over the Alps, invaded Italy, and scored great victories at Lake Trasimene and Cannae. The Romans adopted the Fabian strategy - avoiding battle against Hannibal and defeating his allies and the other Carthaginian generals instead. Scipio Africanus finally defeated Hannibal in 202 B.C., victory put Rome in control of the western Mediterranean and much of Spain.
GB91492. Bronze AE 18, Viola CNP 377l, SNG Cop 1103, SNG Milan XIV 731, Macdonald Hunter 133, McClean 3065, de Luynes IV 3890, Alexandropoulos MAA -, Choice VF, well toned, attractive style, well centered, weight 4.413 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 90o, Sardinia, uncertain mint, Second Punic War, c. 216 - 215 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain, wearing necklace and triple drop earring, Punic letter zayin below chin; reverse bull standing right, star of eight rays around a central pellet above, Punic letters ayin taw (from right to left) lower right; scarce; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 221 - 210 B.C.

|Carthage|, |Carthage,| |Zeugitana,| |North| |Africa,| |c.| |221| |-| |210| |B.C.||AE| |20|
The Second Punic War, 218 - 202 B.C., is marked by Hannibal's surprising crossing of the Alps and crushing victories over Roman armies in the battles of the Trebia, Trasimene, and Cannae. Despite these and other setbacks, Roman forces recaptured the major cities that had joined the enemy, defeated attempts to reinforce Hannibal, and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia. At the final showdown, the battle of Zama in Africa, Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in harsh peace terms. Carthage ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.
GB93784. Bronze AE 20, Viola CNP 196, Alexandropoulos MAA 90, Mller Afrique 235, SNG Cop VIII 302, aVF, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, light corrosion, reverse edge beveled, weight 4.912 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, Second Punic War, c. 221 - 210 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, hair wreathed with grain, no controls; reverse horse standing right, head turned back left, no controls; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justinian II, 10 July 685 - Late 695 and Summer 705 - 4 November 711 A.D.

|Justinian| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justinian| |II,| |10| |July| |685| |-| |Late| |695| |and| |Summer| |705| |-| |4| |November| |711| |A.D.||follis|
The only other example of this variant known to Forum is CNG auction 88, lot 1695 (misdescribed as an ordinary SBCV 1270). All other examples have the K below the H on the left, vice below the Λ on the right. Even the "normal" SBCV 1270 type is missing from the Dumbarton Oaks collection (DOC II 33 refs the Tolstoi coin) and described by Grierson as an extreme rarity.

The cruciform monogram on the obverse left is a monogram of the "God-bearer" (the Virgin Mary). The cruciform monogram on the right is for Justinian.
SH73338. Bronze follis, CNG auction 88, lot 1695 (described as SBCV 1270); cf. SBCV 1270, Tolstoi 81, DOC II 33, Morrisson BnF 15/Ct/AE/03, Hahn MIB 56 (all K below H left), gVF, weight 3.187 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 1st reign, c. 694 - 695 A.D.(?); obverse Justinian standing facing, crown with cross and chlamys, globus cruciger in right hand, akakia in left hand, retrograde cruciform ΘEOTOKE BOHΘEI monogram left, cruciform Justinian monogram right; reverse no legend, large M (40 nummi), Justinian monogram above, H (year 8?) left, Λ over K right, KΓω in exergue; extreme rarity, 2nd known; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius, 5 October 610 - 11 January 641 A.D.

|Heraclius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Heraclius,| |5| |October| |610| |-| |11| |January| |641| |A.D.||half| |siliqua|
Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

The most likely occasion for this issue would have been Martina's coronation in 614 A.D. Based on the number of surviving specimens, production may have continued for several years. Martina was extensively featured on the copper coinage of Heraclius from c. 615 to c. 629 A.D. Rynearson identifies this type as scarce.
SH06184. Silver half siliqua, SBCV 871; DOC II-1 233; Hahn MIB 149; Wroth BMC 343-6; Tolstoi 319-20; Ratto 1460-64; Morrisson BnF 3-11, Choice gVF, weight 0.66 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, die axis 100o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 614 - 618 A.D.; obverse D N ERACLIO PP AV, bust of Heraclius facing, beardless, wearing cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with pendilia and cross; reverse on left bust of Heraclius Constantine wearing chlamys, tablion, crown with pendilia & cross, on right bust of Martina wearing robes & crown with long pendilia & cross, cross between; from the Woolslayer Collection, ex Edward J. Waddell; scarce; SOLD


Non-Imperial Coinages in Africa, "Domino Nostro," c. 5th Century A.D.

|Carthage|, |Non-Imperial| |Coinages| |in| |Africa,| |"Domino| |Nostro,"| |c.| |5th| |Century| |A.D.||half| |centenionalis|
This type has been attributed to the time of Johannes and Boniface in Carthage 423 - 425 A.D., but strong evidence is lacking. We may more safely assume the series is later and copying official issues. The star is probably a crude Christogram or degenerated cross.
ME26375. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X 3815 (R3), LRBC II -, F, weight 0.511 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, obverse DOMINIS NOSTRIS, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse star in wreath; very rare; SOLD


Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, 427 - 534 A.D.

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Vandal| |Kingdom,| |North| |Africa,| |427| |-| |534| |A.D.||4| |nummi|
The 4 nummi was 1/1000 of a gold tremisis.

In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Under the influence of his rival general Atius, Valentinian III's mother, Galla Placidia, had the Roman governor and general Bonifacius convicted of treason. Rather than surrender for execution, Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. Bonifacius made peace with Galla Placidia, but it was too late. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals would rule North Africa until the Eastern Romans (Byzantines) recaptured it in 534.
ME89613. Bronze 4 nummi, MEC I 51 - 56 (Carthage semi-autonomous municipal coinage); Wroth BMCV p. 7, 12 - 14 (Hunneric, 477 - 484 A.D.); MIB I 20 (Gelimer, 530 - 533 A.D.), VF, highlighting red earthen deposits, reverse slightly off center, weight 1.161 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 315o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 480 - 533 A.D.; obverse diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding palm frond; reverse N / IIII (mark of value) in two lines across field; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 53, lot 989 (notes export permit was approved by the Israel Antiquities Authority); rare; SOLD







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