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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Greek Imperial ▸ GaulView Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins from Gaul

Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, L Hostilius Saserna, 48 B.C.

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The events of 48 B.C. are among the best known of ancient history. Caesar defeated Pompey at Pharsalus and later was greeted at Alexandria with a gift of Pompey's head. The twenty-one-year-old Cleopatra VII had herself delivered to him rolled in a carpet and became his mistress. Caesar and Cleopatra defeated Ptolemy XIII, but during the battle the Library of Alexandria was burned.

This type refers to Caesar's taking of Massilia early in the war with Pompey. Artemis Ephesia was held in special reverence at Massilia, where they had a temple dedicated to her.
RR82689. Silver denarius, Crawford 448/3, Sydenham 953, RSC I Hostilia 4, Sear Imperators 19, BMCRR Rome 3996, SRCV I 419, gVF, attractive toning, light marks, die wear, reverse slightly off center, weight 3.993 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 48 B.C.; obverse bare head of Gallia right with long disheveled hair, carnyx (Gallic trumpet) behind; reverse cultus statue of Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus standing facing, laureate, long hair falling down her shoulders and long flowing robes, holding stag left by its antlers with her right hand, vertical spear in left hand, SASERNA curving upward on left, L • HOSTILIVS downward on right; ex Gorny and Mosch auction 176 (10 Mar 2009), lot 1962; scarce; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, 10 - 14 A.D., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

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The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium. This was the last of the COL NEM issues, distinguished by the addition of the title P P (Pater Patriae), an honor bestowed to Augustus in 2 B.C.
RP34063. Bronze dupondius, RIC I 159, RPC I 525, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 161, SRCV 1731, VF, choice green patina, a few small punches on reverse, weight 12.637 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 30o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 10 - 14 A.D.; obverse IMP DIVI F P P, back to back heads of Agrippa and Augustus, Agrippa (on left) facing left wearing a rostral crown Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to palm tree, wreath above, two palms fronds below; SOLD


Nemausus, Gaul, c. 40 B.C.

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Colonia Nemausus was founded as a colony by Tiberius Claudius Nero in 45 or 44 B.C. for veterans that had served Julius Caesar under his command in Gaul and the invasion of Egypt. He was the first husband of Livia and was persuaded or forced by Octavian to divorce her. At the wedding he gave her in marriage to Octavian "just as a father would."
GB90908. Silver obol, RPC I 519, SNG Cop 691, De la Tour 2718, VF, weight 0.294 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse helmeted and draped, male bust right, with long sideburns; reverse NEM COL in laurel wreath; SOLD


Octavian Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Narbo, Gaul

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This issue was probably struck in 40 B.C., perhaps in the spring or Summer when Octavian was in Gaul.

In 40 B.C., with the Treaty of Brundisium, the Triumvirs agreed to divide the Roman Republic into spheres of influence. Gaius Octavian styled himself "Imperator Caesar" and controlled the Western provinces. Mark Antony controlled the Eastern provinces; the River Drin, the boundary between the provinces Illyricum and Macedonia, would serve as their frontier. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus controlled Hispania and Africa. The treaty was cemented by the marriage of Antony and Octavia, sister of Octavian.
RP39921. Leaded bronze as, RPC I 518 (same countermark in same location on pl. coin), F, weight 17.548 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 0o, Narbo (Narbonne, France) mint, c. 40 B.C.; obverse CAESAR, bare head right, countermark of cock; reverse prow with superstructure and mast right; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, c. 9 - 3 B.C., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul

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This two-headed brass dupondius was commonly cut between the heads, creating two individual one-as coins. The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium.
RP84427. Bronze cut half dupondius (as), cf. RIC I 158, RPC I 524, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 152, SRCV I 1730, VF, choice for a cut half, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 8.903 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, c. 9 - 3 B.C.; obverse IMP DIVI F, back to back heads of Augustus and Agrippa (cut, Agrippa off flan), Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath above, two palm fronds below; SOLD


Celtic, Volcae-Arecomici, Gaul, 77 - 44 B.C.

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The Volcae Arecomici surrendered of their own accord to the Roman Republic in 121 B.C., after which they occupied the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis (the area around modern day Narbonne), the southern part of Gallia Transalpina. They held their assemblies in the sacred wood of Nemausus, the site of modern Nîmes.
GB67905. Bronze AE 16, CCCBM III 215 - 230, Castelin 109-110, De la Tour 2677, Depeyrot NC I 142, SNG Dreer 77, Blanchet fig. 475, VF, nice green patina, weight 1.800 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 180o, Nemausus(?) mint, 77 - 44 B.C.; obverse VOLCAE, diademed head of Artemis right; reverse togate male standing slightly left left, palm frond before, AREC upwards on right; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul, 10 - 14 A.D.

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This two-headed brass dupondius type was commonly cut between the heads, creating two individual one-as coins. The final issue of these crocodile dupondii included the P P (Pater Patriae - Father of the Country) on the obverse.
RB42763. Bronze cut half dupondius (as), cf. RIC I 159, RPC I 525, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 161, SRCV 1731, VF/F, weight 6.289 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 10 - 14 A.D.; obverse IMP DIVI F P P, back to back heads of Augustus and Agrippa (cut, Agrippa off flan), Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath with long ties above, two palm fronds below; SOLD


Celts, Gaul, Remi Tribe, c. 100 - 50 B.C.

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The Remi were a Belgic people of north-eastern Gaul, with their capital at Durocortum (Reims, France). They were renowned for their horses and cavalry. The Remi allied themselves with Julius Caesar during the Gallic Wars and were one of the few tribes not to join the rebellion of Vercingetorix.
CE69916. Bronze AE 17, CCCBM III 53, SGCV I 137, De la Tour 8040, Delestrée-Tache 593, Castelin 331, Depeyrot NC VII 24, VF, weight 3.458 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 270o, Durocortum (Reims, France) mint, c. 100 - 50 B.C.; obverse REMO (downward on left), three young male jugate busts left; reverse Victory in a biga galloping left, REMO below; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gaul, 10 - 14 A.D.

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This two-headed brass dupondius type was commonly cut between the heads, creating two individual one-as coins. The final issue of these crocodile dupondii included the P P (Pater Patriae - Father of the Country) on the obverse.
RP85827. Bronze cut half dupondius (as), cf. RIC I 159, RPC I 525, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tüb 161, SRCV 1731, VF, cut half, dark patina, earthen deposits, spots of light corrosion, weight 6.134 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 10 - 14 A.D.; obverse IMP DIVI F P P, back to back heads of Augustus and [Agrippa (cut, Agrippa off flan)], Augustus laureate head right; reverse COL NEM, crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath with long ties above, two palm fronds below; ex Sayles and Lavender; SOLD


Nemausus, Gaul, 120 - 60 B.C.

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The Volcae Arecomici surrendered of their own accord to the Roman Republic in 121 B.C., after which they occupied the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis (the area around modern day Narbonne), the southern part of Gallia Transalpina. They held their assemblies in the sacred wood of Nemausus, the site of modern Nîmes.
GB67906. Bronze AE 15, CCBM III 204 - 212; De la Tour 2698; Castelin 119; Blanchet 436, fig. 476; SNG Cop -; SNG Dreer -, VF, green patina, tight flan, weight 1.827 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 180o, Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, 120 - 60 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo left; reverse boar left, NAMA/SAT starting above, the second line in exergue; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES

American Numismatic Society Collections Database (ANSCD) - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripollès. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 and suppl.).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Roman Provincial Coins (RPC) Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/.
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and The Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sutherland, C. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. I, From 39 BC to AD 69. (London, 1984).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 1: Hispania. Gallia Narbonensis. (Berlin, 1968).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 1: Hispania-Sikelia. (Berlin, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, June 18, 2019.
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Roman Gaul