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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Twelve Caesars||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the 12 Caesars
Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Roman Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Egypt||drachm|
RPC I quotes Walkers surface analysis of Claudius billon at 21 - 26% silver, a significant drop from the 30% silver for those of Tiberius.

The ancients did not all agree on the attributes of Serapis. A passage in Tacitus affirms that many recognized in this god, Aesculapius, imputing healing to his intervention; some thought him identical with Osiris, the oldest deity of the Egyptians; others regarded him as Jupiter, possessing universal power; but by most he was believed to be the same as Pluto, the "gloomy" Dis Pater of the infernal regions. The general impression of the ancients seems to have been that by Serapis, was to be understood the beginning and foundation of things. Julian II consulted the oracle of Apollo for the purpose of learning whether Pluto and Serapis were different gods; and he received for an answer that Jupiter-Serapis and Pluto were one and the same divinity.
SH110653. Billon drachm, RPC I 5136 (4 spec.); BMC Alexandria p. 10, 78; Kampmann 12.25; Emmett 76/3 (R4); Geissen -; Dattari -; SNG Hunterian -, F, dark patina, earthen deposits, scratches, porosity, weight 3.330 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 42 - 43 A.D.; obverse TI KΛ KA CE AY, laureate head right, L Γ (year 3) right; reverse draped bust of Serapis right, kalathos on head; the best of this type known to FORVM; very rare; $1125.00 SALE PRICE $1013.00


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||sestertius|
A decursio was a military exercise, by which Roman soldiers were taught to make long marches in a given time, under arms and without quitting their ranks. They sometimes consisted of a mock fight between two divisions. Augustus and subsequently Hadrian ordered that the infantry and cavalry were to march out three times a month ten miles from the camp and ten miles back, fully armed and equipped. Decursio on this coin probably refers Nero's participation in mock military maneuvers in the circus.
SL111603. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 168 (S); BMCRE I p. 226, 142; BnF II -; Hunter I -; SRCV I -, ANACS VF30 (7432075, says Lugdunum mint in error), dark spots are where the plastic holder is in contact with the coin, weight 27.15 g, maximum diameter 35.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 66 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head left; reverse DECVRSIO, Nero and a soldier on horseback prancing right, Nero bear headed, wearing cuirass and short tunic, and holds spear in right hand, soldier, on far side and slightly behind, holds vexillum in right over shoulder, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking high across field; ex Classical Coins, ANACS| Verify; $970.00 SALE PRICE $873.00


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D. (or Otho or Galba?), Mallus, Cilicia

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.| |(or| |Otho| |or| |Galba?),| |Mallus,| |Cilicia||AE| |25|
In "An intriguing new coin from Mallus, Cilicia" (2008), Jyrki Muona, based on a high grade specimen with an excellent portrait, identified the head on this type as Otho. He noted the portrait is influenced by the style of the Antioch mint. Indeed the portrait on that specimen looks very much like the portraits of Otho from Antioch. RPC I attributes the type to Nero but notes, "The portrait does not look much like Nero, but the date seems clear. Could it possibly be a coin of Galba?" We are following RPC I, listing it as Nero, but noting the other possibilities.
RP112383. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online I 4024 (3 spec.), SNG Levante 1269, aVF, dark green patina with traces of red, cleaning scratches, minor flan flaws on rev. edge, weight 9.678 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 0o, Mallus (near Karatas, Turkey) mint, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse ...CEBACTOC..., laureate head right; reverse MAΛΛΩTΩN, Athena Magarsis standing facing, spear vertical in right hand, star above each arm, EΛP (year 135) outer left; ex CNG e-auction 538 (10 May 2023), lot 413; very rare; $650.00 SALE PRICE $585.00


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||sestertius|
The reverse legend translates, "The gates of Janus' temple are closed because peace of the Roman people is set on both land and sea." On the rare occasions when Rome was not at war the doors of the 'Twin Janus' were ceremonially closed, an event Nero commemorated extensively on the coinage of 65 - 67 A.D. -- Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1 by David R. Sear
SH110266. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 265, BMCRE I 160, Cohen I 144, Mac Dowall WCN 153, BnF I 73 (head right), SRCV I 1958 var. (same), aVF, near centered, weight 24.989 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head left; reverse PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, view of the Temple of Janus from the front left corner, temple front on the right with garland over closed doors within arch, the left side of the temple to the left with long latticed window, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; ex Inasta auction 101 (25 Jun 2022), lot 747; $600.00 SALE PRICE $540.00


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

|Vitellius|, |Vitellius,| |2| |January| |-| |20| |December| |69| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Vitellius was made emperor by his troops on 2 Jan, but Otho was still emperor in Rome until he killed himself on 16 Apr. The Rome mint likely began to strike coinage for Vitellius' about 3 days later, when the soldiers in Rome swore allegiance and the senate hailed him. This coin was struck in next few days or weeks, before they knew what Vitellius looked like.
SL112614. Silver denarius, RIC I 71 (S), RSC II 121, BMCRE I 4, BnF III 37, Hunter -, SRCV I -, NGC F (6827716-002), light scratches, weight 3.052 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 19 Apr - May 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head right (except for hair, an Otho portrait on this early issue); reverse Victory seated left, patera in right, palm frond over shoulder in left; photo taken before certification, NGC| Lookup; scarce; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Moneyer C. f. Gallius Lupercus

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Moneyer| |C.| |f.| |Gallius| |Lupercus||sestertius|
The Latin obverse inscription, OB CIVIS SERVATOS translates "for saving the citizens." The wreath is the corona civica, the oak wreath awarded to Roman citizens ex senatus consulto (by special decree of the Senate) for saving the life of another citizen by slaying an enemy in battle. Augustus was awarded the corona civica in 27 B.C. for saving the lives of citizens by ending the series of civil wars. The abbreviated Latin reverse legend identifies the moneyer who struck this issue, Caius Gallius Lupercus, as a Triumvir Auro, Argento, Aere, Flando, Feriundo - one of three magistrates for casting and striking gold, silver, and bronze.
RB111702. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 377 (S), SRCV I 1646, BMCRE I 171 note, BnF I 415, Cohen I 434, Hunter I 75, F, porous, bumps, scratch, weight 24.772 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, C. Gallius Lupercus, triumvir monetalis, 16 B.C.; obverse inscription in three lines: OB above, CIVIS within, and SERVATOS below oak wreath, between two laurel branches; reverse C GALLIVS C F LVPERCVS III VIR A A A F F, legend around large S•C; first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; scarce; $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Uncertain Mint, Anatolia or Syria

|Roman| |Asia|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Uncertain| |Mint,| |Anatolia| |or| |Syria||AE| |27|
The mint, the quaestor who struck this type, and even the identity of the person in the portrait remain uncertain. The type has previously been attributed to Macedonia and the portrait identified as Brutus (Friedlander) or Caesar (Grant). David Sear notes the type has never been found in Macedonia. Finds point to Syria or Anatolia. It is possible that the type was issued, with his own portrait, by Sosius, a general under Marc Antony who was quaestor in 39 B.C. Much more likely, however, the portrait is of Augustus.
RP111713. Bronze AE 27, RPC I 5409; Sear CRI 957 (Syria); AMNG III 226, pl. III 6, F, dark green patina, weight 18.142 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Anatolian or Syrian mint, c. 39 B.C.(?); obverse bare head right; reverse hasta (spear), sella quaestoria (quaestor's seat of office), and fiscus (imperial treasury), Q (quaestor) below; previously a rare type but recent finds have made it easier to acquire; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Judaea, Pontius Pilate, Roman Prefect Under Tiberius, 26 - 36 A.D.

|Pontius| |Pilate|, |Judaea,| |Pontius| |Pilate,| |Roman| |Prefect| |Under| |Tiberius,| |26| |-| |36| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
Pontius Pilate is chiefly known for the part he played in the trial and crucifixion of Jesus.
JD113015. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6370; Meshorer TJC 331; Sofaer 34; RPC I 4967; BMC Palestine p. 257, 54, VF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. edge beveled, weight 2.198 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, 29 A.D.; obverse IOYΛIA KAICAPOC, three bound heads of barley, the outer two heads drooping; reverse TIBEPIOY KAICAPOC (of Tiberius Caesar) and date LIΣ (year 16) surrounding simpulum (libation ladle); $220.00 SALE PRICE $198.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.

|Claudius|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.||as|
Libertas (Latin for Liberty) was the Roman goddess and embodiment of liberty. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some U.S. coins. On the Seated Liberty dollar, Liberty raises up a pileus (freedom cap) on a rod (liberty pole). Seated Liberty
RB112565. Copper as, RIC I 113, BMCRE I 202, BnF II 230, Hunter I 85, Cohen I 47, SRCV I 1860, F, near centered on a broad flan, nice portrait for the grade, a little rough, weight 10.543 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 42 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head left; reverse LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas standing right, pileus (cap worn by freed slaves) in right hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Collection of Dr. Jregen Buschek; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Judaea, Pontius Pilate, Roman Prefect Under Tiberius, 26 - 36 A.D.

|Pontius| |Pilate|, |Judaea,| |Pontius| |Pilate,| |Roman| |Prefect| |Under| |Tiberius,| |26| |-| |36| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
Pontius Pilate is chiefly known for the part he played in the trial and crucifixion of Jesus. Scholars disagree on the date of this type. If the "S" is actually a retrograde (backward) "Z," the date is year 17 or 30 A.D. If the "S" is actually the Greek letter stigma, the date is year 16 or 29 A.D.
JD113018. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6371a; Meshorer TJC 333b; Sofaer 41; BMC Palestine p. 259, 74; RPC I 4968 var. (LIZ), VF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. edge beveled, bold date, weight 1.861 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, 29 or 30 A.D.; obverse TIBEPIOY KAICAPOC (of Tiberius Caesar), lituus (augural wand); reverse LIς (year 16) or LIZ (Z retrograde, year 17) within wreath; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00




  







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