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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Iberia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Iberia

Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

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CE85318. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Kim and Kroll 59; Van Alfen Hacksilber 53 ff., cut half of a disk ingot; 68.919g, 42.9mm, $320.00 (€281.60)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

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CE85848. Hacksilver fragment, from a disk or ingot; cf. Kim and Kroll 55 ff.; Van Alfen Hacksilber 53 ff., F, weight 21.184 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Iberian Celts, Silver Ingot, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

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AS86897. Silver ingot, Alvarez-Burgos P.9, Kim and Kroll -, Van Alfen Hacksilber-, Garcia-Bellido -, dark toning, earthen encrustations, weight 15.636 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, obverse convex, flattened dome form; reverse flat plain; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Late 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89567. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1354; SNG Cop 217, nice VF, highlighting earthen fill patina, light scratches, weight 3.928 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right on exergue line, star above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue, linear border; ex Lusitania Ancient Coins; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Iberia, Hacksilver, Solid Lunate Earring, c. 650 - 150 B.C.

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The lunate earring type, characterized by a solid crescentric body in a tapered bent over hoop, is the most basic and popular form of earring found in Bronze and Iron Age contexts. The earliest know were found at Ur and date to the third millennium B.C. They are very often found in hacksilver hoards, indicating that they were a bullion medium of exchange. The referenced examples and others known to Forum are all from the East and are under 2 grams. This much larger and heavier example was found in Iberia. Perhaps it was produced locally or perhaps it was brought to the region by Phoenician trade.
CE84812. Hacksilver ring, cf. Gitler Hacksilber 24 ff. (Samaria, late 4th c. B.C.); Golani-Sass Fig. 10, 1 - 2 (Tel Miqne-Ekron, Canaan, 7th c. B.C.) , weight 9.468 g, maximum diameter 32.7 mm, solid silver, crescentric body in a tapered bent over hoop; $170.00 (€149.60)
 


Monnaies grecques en Gaule, Le tresor d'Auriol et le monnayage de Massalia 525/520-460 a. J.-C.

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Greek currency in Gaul. The Auriol Hoard and the coinage of Massalia 525/520 - 460 B.C.
BK13582. Monnaies grecques en Gaule, Le tresor d'Auriol et le monnayage de Massalia 525/520-460 a. J.-C. by A. Furtwängler, TYPOS III, 1978, p. 336, 4 maps, 8 pages of diagrams, 44 plates, international shipping at the actual cost of postage; $160.00 (€140.80)
 


Iberia, Hacksilver, Solid Lunate Earring, c. 650 - 150 B.C.

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The lunate earring type, characterized by a solid crescentric body in a tapered bent over hoop, is the most basic and popular form of earring found in Bronze and Iron Age contexts. The earliest know were found at Ur and date to the third millennium B.C. They are very often found in hacksilver hoards, indicating that they were a bullion medium of exchange. The referenced examples and others known to Forum are all from the East and are under 2 grams. This much larger and heavier example was found in Iberia. Perhaps it was produced locally or perhaps it was brought to the region by Phoenician trade.
CE84813. Silver Ring Money, cf. Gitler Hacksilber 24 ff. (Samaria, late 4th c. B.C.); Golani-Sass Fig. 10, 1 - 2 (Tel Miqne-Ekron, Canaan, 7th c. B.C.) , weight 6.575 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, solid silver, crescentric body in a tapered bent over hoop; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Late 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89050. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1354; SNG Cop 217, Choice F, broad flan, attractive patina, scattered porosity, weight 3.827 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 210o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right on exergue line, star above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue, linear border; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Indigets, Untikesken, Emporion, Iberia, c. 130 - 90 B.C.

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Early in the 2nd century B.C., Emporion began striking bronze coinage with the Iberian inscription UTIKENSKEN, which refers to the Indigets tribe that inhabited the town and its surrounding area. The earliest coins were struck at a one ounce standard of 1/12 Roman pound. In the mid 2nd Century B.C., the standard changed to 1/15th of the Roman pound. Some of these coins were marked XV, most were marked with an Iberian EI mark, which means 15. The names of magistrates were added to some coins in the second half of the 2nd century B.C. Weights were gradually reduced until coinage with Iberian inscriptions ended in the 1st century B.C.
GB88304. Bronze as, reduced Roman ounce standard, Villaronga-Benages 1043 (same dies), Villaronga CNH 50, cf. SNG BM Spain 522, F, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, soft strike, weak reverse, weight 14.462 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Emporion (Empúries, Catalonia, Spain) mint, c. 130 - 90 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena-Minerva right, Iberian mark before: EI (15); reverse Pegasos springing right, head modified, laurel wreath above rump, palm frond outer right, Iberian inscription above exergue line: UTIKESKEN; ex Jenceck Historical Enterprise; $100.00 (€88.00)
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Mid 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89045. Bronze as, Villaronga-Benages 2126, Villaronga 23, SNG BM Spain 1298, Burgos 695, SNG Cop -, aVF, earthen encrustation, scratches, spots of light corrosion, reverse a little off center, weight 18.451 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 90o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, mid 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse helmeted sphinx walking right, left foreleg raised, star before, KASTILO in Iberic script below exergue line; ex Rusty Romans; $100.00 (€88.00)
 




  



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REFERENCES|

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Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
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Gomes, A. Moedas do território português antes da fundação de la nacionalidade (Hispano-romanas). (Lisbon, 1998).
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Jenkings, G. "Notes on Iberian Denarii from the Cordova Hoard" in ANSMN VII. (New York, 1958).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 1: Hispania-Sikelia. (1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 1: Spain-Italy. (1938).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections. Part 1: Spain (Emporiae, Rhoda) - Italy. (1940).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 2: Spain. (London, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain X, John Morcom Collection. (Oxford, 1995).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Hispania I, Madrid. Museo Arqueológico Nacional. Ciudades Feno-púnicas.. (1994-2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Hispania II, Madrid. Ciudades del area meridional. Acuñaciones con escritura indígena. (2005).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Hungary, Budapest, Magyar Nemzeti Múzeum I, Hispania - Sicilia, Part 1: Hispania-Apulia. (1992).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Spain, Museo Arqueológico Nacional Madrid. (Madrid, 1994-2005).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Sweden, Vol. II, Stockholm, Part 6. The Collection of The Royal Coin Cabinet. National Museum of Monetary History. The G.D. Lorichs Collection. (2003).
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Villaronga, L. La Monedas Hispano-Cartaginesas. (Barcelona, 1973).
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Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 22, 2019.
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Iberia