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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Harmony||View Options:  |  |  |   

Harmony (Homonoia or Concordia)

In Roman religion, Concordia was the goddess of harmony, concord, agreement, understanding, oneness of mind, and marital harmony. The greek name for her was Homonoia. The cult of Concordia Augusta ("Majestic Harmony") was of special importance to the imperial household. Concord between emperors and with the military was especially important and often the subject of coinage. Concordia is usually depicted wearing a long cloak and holding a patera (sacrificial bowl), a cornucopia (symbol of prosperity), or a caduceus (symbol of peace).


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.

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The first Rome mint portrait sestertius type, and a highly sought after reverse type.
SH38172. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 33; BMCRE p. 152, 36; BnF II 47; Cohen I 4; SRCV I 1800, NGC VF, Strike 5, Surface 2, weight 26.340 g, maximum diameter 34.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, laureate head left; reverse AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; NGC certified, excellent centering and strike, attractive portrait, patina worn on high spots; rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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Saint Paul (also called Paul the Apostle, born Saul of Tarsus) arrived in Rome around 60. The narrative of Acts ends with Paul preaching in Rome for two years from his rented home under house arrest while awaiting trial. The New Testament does not say when or how Paul died. It is believed Nero had him killed after the Great Fire of Rome in July 64, but before the last year of his reign in 68.

In 2002, an 8 foot long marble sarcophagus, inscribed with the words "PAULO APOSTOLO MART" ("Paul apostle martyr") was discovered during excavations around the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls on the Via Ostiensis. Vatican archaeologists declared this to be the tomb of Paul the Apostle in 2005. In June 2009, Pope Benedict XVI announced excavation results concerning the tomb. The sarcophagus was not opened but was examined by means of a probe, which revealed pieces of incense, purple and blue linen, and small bone fragments. The bone was radiocarbon-dated to the 1st or 2nd century. According to the Vatican, these findings support the conclusion that the tomb is Paul's.
SH54548. Gold aureus, Calico 405, RIC I 48, Cohen I 66, VF, hairline scratches, weight 7.420 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 64 - 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGVSTVS (harmony of the Emperor), Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; SOLD


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.

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The first Rome mint portrait sestertius type, and a highly sought after reverse type.
SH32176. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 33; BMCRE p. 152, 36; BnF II 47; Cohen I 4; SRCV I 1800, aVF, full circles strike, light corrosion, weight 24.043 g, maximum diameter 36.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, laureate head left; reverse AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; ex CNG e-sale 11/07, lot 220; rare; SOLD


Didius Julianus, 28 March - 2 June 193 A.D.

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Didius Julianus was born in 133 A.D. and followed a military career. He rose to the rank of legion commander, then Consul and Proconsul of Africa. After Pertinax was murdered, the Praetorian Guard (the emperor's personal bodyguard force) advertised that they were offering the throne to the highest bidder. If not the richest, Didius Julianus was one the richest men in Rome and offered 25,000 sestertii for each man! The Roman people were incensed by the auction and several provincial governors rose up against him. As Septimius Severus approached Rome, only 66 days into his reign, Didius Julianus was betrayed and beheaded by the Praetorians. Coins of Didius Julianus are very rare due to his short reign.
SH33682. Silver denarius, RIC IV 1 (R3), RSC III 2, BMCRE V 2, SRCV II 6072, Hunter III -, nice VF, weight 2.824 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 28 Mar - late May 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M DID IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Concordia standing half-left, legionary aquila (eagle) standard in right hand, signum standard in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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In July 324, at the Battle of Hellespont, Crispus, destroyed Licinius' naval fleet in the Dardanelles, allowing his father Constantine the ability to cross over the Bosporus into Asian provinces. Byzantium was besieged and Licinius assembled a second military force, under his newly elevated co-emperor Martinian at Lampsacus (modern Lapseki).
SH12095. Gold solidus, RIC VII Cyzicus 20, SRCV IV 16639 ($16,000 in EF), Depeyrot 16/1, Cohen VII 56 var., gVF, ex jewelry - edge repairs and gold jewelry solder, weight 4.046 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 324 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, nude bust left holding spear and shield; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG NN (harmony between our two emperors), Concordia seated left on throne, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand arm, SMKE in exergue; ex Jonathan Kern's personal collection; very rare; SOLD


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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High relief portrait and nice style. Some of the best Roman engravers worked at the Rome Mint from the late reign of Nero to the early reign of Vespasian. Apparently their ranks were thinned by the Civil Wars of 69 A.D., because the bronze coinage of Vespasian is, by comparison, pedestrian in style.
SH37568. Orichalcum dupondius, SRCV I 2213, RIC I 162, Cohen I 15, BMCRE I 65, BnF III 116, gVF, weight 13.643 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GERMA IMP AVG P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGVSTI (to the harmony of the Emperor), Concordia seated left holding patera and cornucopia, lit garlanded altar before, S C in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Didius Julianus, 28 March - 2 June 193 A.D.

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Didius Julianus was born in 133 A.D. and followed a military career. He rose to the rank of legion commander, then Consul and Proconsul of Africa. After Pertinax was murdered, the Praetorian Guard (the emperor's personal bodyguard force) advertised that they were offering the throne to the highest bidder. If not the richest, Didius Julianus was one the richest men in Rome and offered 25,000 sestertii for each man! The Roman people were incensed by the auction and several provincial governors rose up against him. As Septimius Severus approached Rome, only 66 days into his reign, Didius Julianus was betrayed and beheaded by the Praetorians. Coins of Didius Julianus are very rare due to his short reign.
SH33678. Silver denarius, RIC IV 1 (R3), RSC III 2, BMCRE V 2, SRCV II 6072, Hunter III -, VF, weight 3.218 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 28 Mar - late May 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M DID IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Concordia standing half-left, legionary aquila (eagle) standard in right hand, signum standard in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The first Rome mint portrait sestertius type, and a highly sought after reverse type.
SH84794. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 33; BMCRE p. 152, 36; BnF II 47; Cohen I 4; SRCV I 1800, gF, excellent centering and strike, attractive portrait, patina worn and scraped on high points, bumps and scratches, weight 27.881 g, maximum diameter 35.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, laureate head left; reverse AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; rare; SOLD


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D., Ex John Quincy Adams Collection

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Ex John Quincy Adams Collection, 6th President of the United States, and His Descendants, ex Massachusetts Historical Society Collection, ex Stack's Sale, 5-6 March 1971.
SH28063. Silver denarius, RIC I 73, RSC II 20, BMCRE I 7, BnF III 38, gVF, weight 3.167 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right; reverse CONCORDIA P R (harmony with the people of Rome), Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; scarce; SOLD


Didius Julianus, 28 March - 2 June 193 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Didius Julianus was born in 133 A.D. and followed a military career. He rose to the rank of legion commander, then Consul and Proconsul of Africa. After Pertinax was murdered, the Praetorian Guard (the emperor's personal bodyguard force) advertised that they were offering the throne to the highest bidder. If not the richest, Didius Julianus was one the richest men in Rome and offered 25,000 sestertii for each man! The Roman people were incensed by the auction and several provincial governors rose up against him. As Septimius Severus approached Rome, only 66 days into his reign, Didius Julianus was betrayed and beheaded by the Praetorians. Coins of Didius Julianus are very rare due to his short reign.
SH86629. Silver denarius, RIC IV 1 (R3), RSC III 2, BMCRE V 2, SRCV II 6072, Hunter III -, F, toned, centered on a tight flan, marks, tiny edge cracks, minor flan flaws on reverse, weight 2.608 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 28 Mar - late May 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M DID IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Concordia standing half-left, legionary aquila (eagle) standard in right hand, signum standard in left hand; very rare; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 22, 2019.
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Harmony