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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ CheerfulnessView Options:  |  |  |   

Cheerfulness (Hilaritas)

Cheerfulness is personified on Roman coins by Hilaritas. Coins with this subject celebrated the brighter side of life, or in harder times explained that the Empire was moving toward a happier future.


Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla

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Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
SH33950. Silver denarius, SRCV II 7071, RIC IV 371, RSC III 14, BMCRE V 737, gVF, weight 3.241 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 202 A.D.; obverse PLAVTILLAE AVGVSTAE, draped bust right; reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, long branch in right hand, cornucopia in left; attractive hairstyle and drapery; SOLD


Crispina, Wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 - 182 A.D.

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Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RS67692. Silver denarius, RIC III 282, RSC II 18, BMCRE IV 40, VF, weight 3.436 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 180 - 182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, long grounded palm branch in right hand, cornucopia in left; scarce; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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This type of reverse usually indicates the birth of a prince, and we would normally assume the boy and girl on the reverse represent children of the emperor. Hadrian and Sabina, however, had no children.
RB73704. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 970b, Hunter II 447, BMCRE III 1370, Cohen II 817 (Hilaritas half nude, probably in error), SRCV II 3602 var. (drapery), aVF, excellent portrait, well centered, toned Tiber patina, grainy and porous, some corrosion, cleaning marks, weight 26.921 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right, long neck; reverse HILARITAS P R (Joy of the Roman People), Hilaritas standing half left, palm frond in right hand, scepter in left hand, at her feet on left a small nude boy standing right also holding the palm frond, at feet on right a dressed small girl standing left and reaching up touching Hilaritas' drapery, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, COS III in exergue; big 33mm brass!; SOLD


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RB63755. Copper as, SRCV II 4828, RIC III Ant Pius 1260, Cohen III 231, VF, nice green patina, weight 10.236 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 150o, Rome mint, as caesar, 144 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR PII F COS II, bare head right; reverse HILARITAS S C, Hilaritas (the personification of rejoicing) standing left holding long palm frond and cornucopia; scarce; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.

The two children on the reverse represent Cararcalla and Geta.
RS11050. Silver denarius, BMCRE V p. 161, 35; RIC IV S557, RSC III 79; Hunter III p. 43, 27; SRCV II 6587, Choice EF, full circle centering, very attractive, weight 3.383 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 200 - 202 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in waved horizontal ridges, bun at back of head; reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing facing between two naked small boys (Caracalla and Geta), her head left, her right leg forward, long grounded near vertical palm frond in her right hand, cornucopia in her left, the boy on the left touches the palm, the boy on the right touches her drapery; SOLD


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RB34795. Copper as, SRCV II 4828, RIC III Ant Pius 1260, Cohen III 231, VF, weight 9.450 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 144 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR PII F COS II, bare head right; reverse HILARITAS S C, Hilaritas (the personification of rejoicing) standing left holding long palm frond and cornucopia; dark green patina, attractive style; scarce; SOLD


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RB34813. Copper as, SRCV II 4828, RIC III Ant Pius 1260, Cohen III 231, gVF, dark green patina, attractive style, weight 9.833 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 144 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR PII F COS II, bare head right; reverse HILARITAS S C, Hilaritas (the personification of rejoicing) standing left holding long palm frond and cornucopia; scarce; SOLD


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

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Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
RS47416. Silver denarius, RIC III MA686, RSC II 111, BMCRE IV MA100, Hunter II 6, SRCV II 5254, aEF, toned, attractive style on both obverse and reverse, well centered and struck, weight 3.047 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair waived and drawn back into a coil a the back of neck; reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing slightly left, head left, long grounded palm frond in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RS65180. Silver denarius, RSC III 157b; RIC IV 479A(b); BMCRE V 443A; cf. SRCV II 6278 (obv leg, 194 A.D.), VF, weight 2.604 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 193 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV P-ERT AVG IMP VII-I (final I apparently unstruck), laureate head right; reverse FORT REDVC, Fortuna (Hilaritas) standing left, long grounded palm frond near vertical in right, cornucopia in left; rare (R2); SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Hilaritas, the personification of rejoicing, is usually depicted as a matron, standing with a cornucopia in her left hand and a long palm frond on the ground in her right. Green branches were a sign of gladness and for special occasions, both public and private, it was the custom in ancient times to ornament streets, temples, gates, houses, and even entire cities, with branches and leaves of trees. This tradition carries on today in the form of wreaths and Christmas trees.
SH51524. Copper as, SRCV II 6641, RIC IV S877, Choice aVF, weight 8.881 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 198 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse HILARITAS S C, Hilaritas standing half left, grounded palm frond in right, cornucopia in left; beautiful green patina; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Tuesday, June 18, 2019.
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Cheerfulness