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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Democracy||View Options:  |  |  | 

Democracy (Demos - The People)

The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century BC. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the emperor, Boule, or the Demos of another city.

Here we will also include coins that depict personifications of the Senate, citizens councilman (boule), and elders (gerousia), and any coin that depicts voting.

Bagis, Lydia, c. 193 - 268 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Bagis,| |Lydia,| |c.| |193| |-| |268| |A.D.||AE| |26|
Inscriptions uncovered by Keppel place ancient Bagis near Sirghe on the left (south) side of the Hermos River. Modern scholars pinpoint a site at Gre, Usak Province, Turkey. The "Treasures of Croesus" findings from Lydian tumuli around the town were plundered in the 1960s but recovered by the 2000s and now in the Usak Museum.
RP99127. Bronze AE 26, GRPC Lydia II pl. 29, 36; SNG Cop 45; SNG Mn 45; SNG Tb 3667; BMC Lydia p. 33, 16; Winterthur 3702; Weber 6786; SNGvA -, VF, attractive style, well centered on a tight flan, green patina, weight 9.455 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Bagis (Gre, Turkey) mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse CVNK-ΛHTOC, youthful draped bust of the Roman Senate right; reverse KAICAPEΩN BAΓHNΩN, Tyche standing sightly left, head left, kalathos on head, holding grounded rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 253 - 268 A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |253| |-| |268| |A.D.||diassarion|
The image of Demos, the personification of the People, was used on ancient coinage as early as the 5th century B.C. In Roman times, many towns under Roman domination struck pseudo-autonomous coinage depicting either the bust or head of Demos, or showed him standing with the Emperor, Boule (the city council), or the Demos of another city.
RP112281. Bronze diassarion, BMC Phrygia p. 162, 13; SNGvA 3774; SNG Mnchen 315; SNG Cop -, VF, dark green patina, earthen deposits, weight 12.431 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kotiaeion (Ktahya, Turkey) mint, time of Gallienus, c. 253 - 268 A.D.; obverse ΔHMOC (Demos) KOTIAEΩN, diademed bust of the Demos to right, slight drapery over far shoulder; reverse EΠI Π AIΛ ΔHMHTPIANOV IΠΠI, AP-X across fields (under the authority of P. Aelius Demetrius, Archon, HMH ligate), Sol standing in facing spread quadriga, head left, raising right hand commanding sunrise, globe in left hand, no star and crescent below horses, KOTIAEΩN (ΩN ligate) in exergue; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Daldis, Lydia, 69 - 79 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Daldis,| |Lydia,| |69| |-| |79| |A.D.||hemiassarion|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mn. Mn had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
GB96503. Bronze hemiassarion, GRPC Lydia 4; RPC Online II 1325 (12 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 70, 2; SNG Cop 110, F, green patina, tight flan cutting off much of legends, legends weak, earthen deposits, weight 3.818 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Daldis (near Narlkale, Turkey) mint, time of Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYNKΛHTON, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EΠI TI ΦΛA YΛA ΦΛA KAICAP ΔAΛΔI (struck under Titus Flavius Hylas [at] Flaviocaesaria Daldis), Zeus Lydios standing left, wearing long chiton and himation, eagle in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Attaea, Mysia, Late 2nd Century A.D.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Attaea,| |Mysia,| |Late| |2nd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |18|
Attaea appears to be known only from its coinage. Its site is uncertain but, based on coin finds, may be Dikeliky, Turkey.
RP111827. Bronze AE 18, SNGvA 7203, SNG BnF 136, von Fritze Mysiens 357, Waddington 5744, RPC IV.2 online -, SNG Cop -, aVF, nice green patina, light corrosion, scratches, earthen deposits, weight 5.102 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Attaea (Dikeliky, Turkey?) mint, reign of Marcus Aurelius(?), late 2nd century A.D.; obverse IEPA CVNKΛHTOC, draped bust of the youthful Senate right; reverse ATTAITΩN, youthful male figure (founding hero?) standing right, beardless, with short hair, left foot on cippus, upper body bent forward, arms crossed resting both on left thigh; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Cibyra, Phrygia, 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Cibyra,| |Phrygia,| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |26|
Nemesis, the winged balancer of life, is the goddess of revenge, the avenger of crimes and punisher of wicked doers. She distributes fortune, good or bad, in due proportion to each according to what is deserved. She often holds a lorum, a long scarf worn by Roman magistrates, to symbolize her authority as judge, and sometimes holds scales and cubit rule to measure each man's just deserts. The wheel of fate sometimes rests against her side. On this coin she holds her adamantine bridles to restrain the frivolous insolences of mortals.
RP110162. Bronze AE 26, SNGvA 3726; SNG Cop 277; BMC Phrygia p. 136, 33, aVF/F, well centered, dark tone, earthen encrustation, weight 10.162 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Kibyra (near Glhisar, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.; obverse BOYΛH (clockwise from upper right), laureate, veiled, and draped bust of Boule right; reverse KAIC KIBY-PATΩN, Nemesis standing facing, head left, pulling out chiton from her breast with right hand, adamantine bridles in left hand hanging down at side; rare; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Kibyra, Phrygia, c. 138 - 192 A.D.

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Kibyra,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |138| |-| |192| |A.D.||AE| |21|
Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Glhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP110161. Bronze AE 21, RPC IV.2 T1953 (10 spec.); Kurth Demos 358; SNG Cop 276; SNGvA 3724; BMC Phrygia p. 135, 25; SNG Mu -; Lindgren -, aVF/VF, dark green patina, rough, porous, earthen deposits, broad flan, weight 6.631 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, c. 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse ΔHMOC (clockwise from upper right), laureate head of Demos right, unbearded; reverse KIBYPATWN, Demeter standing slightly left, head left, wearing long chiton and veil, poppy and grain in right hand, long torch in left hand; rare; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Roman Republic, First Triumvirate, M. Junius Brutus (Q. Caepio Brutus), 54 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |First| |Triumvirate,| |M.| |Junius| |Brutus| |(Q.| |Caepio| |Brutus),| |54| |B.C.||denarius|
M. Junius Brutus (also called Q. Caepio Brutus) is the most famous of Caesars assassins. Many of Brutus' coins honor his ancestors and illustrate his strong republican views. The obverse honors L. Junius Brutus, the consul who in 509 B.C. forced the expulsion of the Tarquin Kings from Rome and founded the Republic. The reverse honors Gaius Servilius Ahala, who threw Spurius Maelius down from the Tarpeian rock to his death for plotting against the Republic and aspiring to tyranny. Caesar should not have been surprised by Brutus!
RR86434. Silver denarius, RSC I Junia 30, Sydenham 907, Crawford 433/2, BMCRR I Rome 3864, Russo RBW 1543, SRCV I 398, VF, iridescent toning, obverse a little off center, scratches, weight 3.542 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 54 B.C.; obverse bearded bare head of L. Junius Brutus (consul 509 B.C.), BRVTVS behind; reverse bearded bare head of C. Servilius Ahala (master of the horse 439 B.C.), AHALA behind; SOLD


Hadrianothera, Mysia, c. 130 - 161 A.D.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Hadrianothera,| |Mysia,| |c.| |130| |-| |161| |A.D.||AE| |19|
Hadrianothera was founded by Hadrian to commemorate his successful hunting expedition in the area.
RP77196. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 1635; SNG BnF 1084; SNGvA 1145 - 1146; BMC Mysia, p. 75, 1; SNG Cop -, Choice VF, some scratches and bumps, areas of porosity, weight 4.377 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Hadrianothera (near Dursunbey, Turkey) mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 130 - 161 A.D.; obverse IEPA CYNKΛHTOCC, draped youthful bust of the senate right; reverse AΔPIANOΘHPITΩN, Asklepios standing facing, head left, himation around waist and legs and over left shoulder, leaning on snake entwined staff in right hand, monogram lower right; rare; SOLD


Annia Faustina, Augusta, 221 A.D., Third Wife of Elagabalus, Hierapolis, Phrygia

|Hierapolis|, |Annia| |Faustina,| |Augusta,| |221| |A.D.,| |Third| |Wife| |of| |Elagabalus,| |Hierapolis,| |Phrygia||AE| |23|
In 221, after Elagabalus was induced to end his highly controversial marriage to the Vestal Virgin Aquilia Severa, he married the recently widowed Annia Aurelia Faustina. The marriage was intended to form an alliance with the powerful aristocratic Nerva-Antonine clan, resulting from her blood relation to the dynasty. Elagabalus gave her the title of Augusta. Supporters of Elagabalus had hoped that Annia, the mother of two small children from her previous marriage, would bear him a natural heir; however, she bore him no children. There are no surviving sources providing details of Annia Aurelia Faustina's short time as a Roman empress. Before the end of 221, Elagabalus divorced her and returned to Julia Aquilia Severa. After her marriage to Elagabalus ended, she returned with her children to her Pisidian Estate where she spent the final years of her life.

The AKTIA festival and games at Hierapolis were founded in honor of Augustus' victory at Actium.
RP77251. Bronze AE 23, Johnston Hierapolis 74; BMC Phrygia p. 242, 89; SNG Cop 444; Waddington 6128; SNGvA -; SNG Tb -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Leypold -; Weber -; McClean -, aF, weight 7.085 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, c. 221 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPACY-NKΛHTO-C, draped bust of the senate right; reverse IEPAΠOΛEITΩN NEΩKOPΩN, A/KTI/A in three lines within a demos crown (laurel wreath); very rare; SOLD


Eumeneia, Phrygia, c. 244 - 249 A.D.

|Eumeneia|, |Eumeneia,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |244| |-| |249| |A.D.||AE| |23|
Eumenia, Phrygia was founded by Attalus II Philadelphus (159 - 138 B.C.) at the source of the Cludrus, near the Glaucus, and named after his brother Eumenes. Numerous inscriptions and many coins remain to show that Eumenia was an important and prosperous city under Roman rule. As early as the third century its population was in great part Christian, and it seems to have suffered much during the persecution of Diocletian. The remains of Eumenia are located in Denizli Province, Turkey on the shore of Lake Isikli near Civril.
RP97255. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online VIII U20608 (8 spec., 2 var.); BMC Phrygia p. 214, 24; Lindgren III 583; SNG Cop 389 var. (leg. from upper r.); SNGvA 3586 var. (same), VF, green patina, rough areas, scattered porosity, weight 7.002 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Eumeneia (near Civril, Turkey) mint, reign of Philip I, c. 244 - 249 A.D.; obverse IEPA CVNKΛHTOC (clockwise from the lower left), bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right; reverse EVMENEΩ-N AXAIΩN, cult image of Artemis Ephesia standing facing, wearing kalathos and veil, with arm supports, between two stags standing facing outward with heads turned back towards the goddess; ex Savoca Numismatik, silver auction 82 (26 Jul 2020), lot 247; this coin is the primary plate coin for the type in RPC Online VIII; rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Kurth, D. Demos, The Personification of the People. (2010).
Martin, K. Demos, Boule, Gerousia: Personifikationen stdtischer Institutionen auf kaiserzeitlichen Mnzen aus Kleinasien. (Bonn, 2013).


Catalog current as of Monday, September 25, 2023.
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