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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Piety||View Options:  |  |  | 

Piety (Pietas)

Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to other people, gods and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.

Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 225 - 170 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |225| |-| |170| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95933. Silver triobol, Tsangari 507 (D13/R16); BCD Akarnania 472; SNG Cop III 14; BMC Thessaly p. 196, 26; HGC 4 950 (R1), aVF, attractive toning, scratches, tight flan, flan flaw rev. lower right, small edge split, weight 2.261 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 225o, Aitolian mint, c. 225 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above sloping downward parallel to boar's back, (ΠA monogram) below, ∆I and spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $200.00 (€184.00)
 


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||sestertius|
For Roman wives, piety often meant accepting neglect. It was not considered adultery for a Roman husband to have sex with slaves or unmarried women. The historian Spartianus wrote that after Lucilla complained, Lucius Verus reproached her: "Uxor enim dignitatis nomen est, non voluptatis" (Wife is the name of dignity, not bliss).
RB79813. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1756, BMCRE IV 1161, Cohen III 54, Hunter II 27, SRCV II 5505, F, glossy dark sea-green patina, light corrosion on obverse, rough areas on reverse, squared tight flan, weight 19.430 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right; reverse PIETAS, Pietas standing left, veiled, raising her right hand, perfume-box in left hand, flaming altar at feet on left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS93316. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1684m (Samosata), RSC IV 792b (Antioch), Hunter IV J68, Cunetio 849 (31 spec.), RIC V-1 J447, SRCV III 10312, Choice aEF, sharp portrait, well centered, toned, reverse die wear, ragged edge, weight 3.412 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Syrian mint, 256 - 258 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PIETAS AVGG (to the piety of the two emperors), Valerian and Gallienus standing confronting each other, facing center, sacrificing at flaming altar in center, togate, on left holding eagle-tipped scepter, on right hand on parazonium on left side; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $70.00 (€64.40)
 







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