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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Nautical & Marine| ▸ |Ships||View Options:  |  |  |   

Galleys and Other Ships on Ancient Coins
Lampsacus (as Colonia Gemella Iulia Lampsacus), Mysia, c. 45 - 35 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsacus| |(as| |Colonia| |Gemella| |Iulia| |Lampsacus),| |Mysia,| |c.| |45| |-| |35| |B.C.||as|
M. Grant (Grant FITA, p. 246) first and convincingly attributed this type to Lampsacus. P. Brunt (Italian Manpower, p. 600) argues convincingly that the colony at Lampsakos was founded by Julius Caesar about 45 B.C. (a twin colony to another at Parium) and disappeared after its occupation by Sextus Pompey in 35 B.C. The reverse legend identifies Q. Lucretius and L. Pontius as the colony's first duoviri. This type was likely struck at the time the colony was founded or very soon after.
RP96982. Bronze as, RPC Online I 2273 (7 spec.); Grant FITA p. 246, 5; Robinson NC 1921 p. 7, 6 (Parion); Imhoof MG p. 252, 126 (Parion), VF, green patina, earthen encrustation, inscriptions not fully struck, weight 3.550 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, dictatorship of Julius Caesar, c. 45 - 44 B.C.; obverse C G I L (Colonia Gemella Julia Lampsakos), bearded head of Janus, C G I L (Colonia Gemella Julia Lampsakos) divided across field, countermark: monogram; reverse Q LVCRET L PONTI-O IIVIR COL DED PR (Q. Lucretius [and] L. Pontius, duoviri colonia deducta primis), prow of war galley right; Coin Archives records only four sales of this type (two with this countermark) in the last two decades; very rare; $500.00 (€410.00)
 


Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains of Palestine, almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:7–8). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed the city in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C. Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria.
JD97789. Silver hemiobol, Meshorer-Qedar 152, Sofaer -, Samaria Hoard -, Hendin -, SNG ANS -, HGC 10 -, aVF, dark toning in fields, scratches, obverse off center, weight 0.396 g, maximum diameter 7.5 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (10 km NW of Nablus, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse Phoenician galley left, with partially furled sails over zigzag waves; reverse head of Bes facing, within a shaped incuse; very rare; $360.00 (€295.20)
 


Lot of 4 Silver Fractions From Phoenicia, c. 425 - 300 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Lot| |of| |4| |Silver| |Fractions| |From| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |425| |-| |300| |B.C.||Lot|
 
GA97055. Silver Lot, 4 silver fractions, c. 0.6g - 0.8g, c. 9mm, $160.00 (€131.20)
 


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
The anchor was adopted from the Selukids, who used it to symbolize their naval strength. Anchors are often depicted upside down, as they would be seen hung on the side of a boat ready for use.
JD97705. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 69b; BMC Palestine p. 235, 39; Meshorer AJC II p. 239, 2b; Hendin 1193; RPC I 4912, VF, weight 1.605 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 4 - 6 B.C.; obverse HPω∆OY (of Herod), anchor with long slender arms; reverse EΘ/AN (Ethnarch), surrounded by oak wreath; from an Israeli collection; scarce; $150.00 (€123.00)
 


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||2| |prutot|
Based on the fabric and style, we know that Herod used the same mint in Jerusalem as his father, Herod the Great.
JD98155. Bronze 2 prutot, cf. Meshorer TJC p. 225 & pl. 47, 70; Sofaer p. 258 & pl. 209, 68; BMC Palestine p. 231, 3; Hendin 1194; RPC I 4914, aF, highlighting earthen deposits (desert patina), small edge crack, edge chip, weight 1.767 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HRω∆ (of Herod), double cornucopia, horns parallel curved to the left, adorned with grapes; reverse EΘNP/N (Ethnarch, blundered), war galley left with aphlaston, oars, cabin, and ram; from an Israeli collection; rare; $150.00 (€123.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C., Joppa(?), Judaea

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.,| |Joppa(?),| |Judaea||AE| |13|
In 138 B.C., Antiochus VII besieged the Seleukid usurper Tryphon at the fortress-city of Dor. Tryphon escaped, only to be defeated later. Some sources say he was captured and executed, others that he committed suicide. In 134, Antiochus VII laid siege to Jerusalem. According to Josephus, the Hasmonean king John Hyrcanus opened King David's sepulcher and removed three thousand talents, which he then paid Antiochus to spare the city.

This type has been traditionally attributed to Ascalon, however, no specimens have been found in the Maresha excavations east of that city. The type is acquired in Lower Galilee, Samaria, and Jerusalem. The types indicate it was likely a military coinage and the aphlaston points to a coastal mint. The evidence suggests it dates to Antiochus' campaign against Tryphon and may have been struck by a military mint attached to the army besieging Dor, perhaps in or around Joppa.
JD98121. Bronze AE 13, Houghton-Lorber II 2122; Brett Ascalon 10; Houghton CSE 818; SNG Spaer 2095; HGC 9 1111 (R1), VF, highlighting earthen deposits, edge splits, reverse edge beveled, weight 1.094 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, die axis 180o, perhaps Joppa (Jaffa, Israel) mint, 138 - 129 B.C.; obverse crested Boeotian helmet with cheek-guards right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY, upright galley aphlaston (ship's stern ornament, also known as an apluster); from an Israeli Collection; rare; $140.00 (€114.80)
 


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||2| |prutot|
Son of Herod the Great, Archelaus inherited Judaea, Samaria and Idumaea. Jerusalem was his capital. Augustus denied him the title king and gave him the title ethnarch, with a promise to name him king if he governed well. He was so unpopular with his subjects that Augustus deposed him, banished him to Gaul and annexed his territory.
JD97739. Bronze 2 prutot, cf. BMC Palestine p. 231, 3; RPC Online I 4914; Meshorer TJC p. 224, 70; Sofaer p. 260, 70; Hendin 1194 (none with these blundered inscriptions), aVF, smoothing, edge crack, obverse edge beveled, weight 2.911 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPωX (or similar, blundered, of Herod), double cornucopia, horns parallel curved to the left, adorned with grapes; reverse EΘNA/HX/CM (or similar, blundered, Ethnarch), war galley left with aphlaston, oars, cabin, and ram; ex Savoca Numismatik auction 3 (15 Sep 2019), lot 69; $135.00 (€110.70)
 


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C.

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.||prutah|
The lily was regarded as the choicest among the flowers. It graced the capitals of the two main pillars which stood at the entrance to the sanctuary. See Symbols| on Judean| Coins| in NumisWiki.
JD97678. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1148; Meshorer TJC N; Meshorer AJC A; Sofaer Collection 214; BMC Palestine p. 198, 1; HGC 10 636, aVF, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, off center strike, weight 1.891 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, c. 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: Yehonatan the King, half opened lily flower; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY (King Alexander in Greek), anchor with two cross bars within diadem; from an Israeli collection; scarce; $120.00 (€98.40)
 


Roman Republic, Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, Eldest Son of Pompey the Great, Executed in 45 B.C.

|Pompeians|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Gnaeus| |Pompey| |Junior,| |Imperator,| |Eldest| |Son| |of| |Pompey| |the| |Great,| |Executed| |in| |45| |B.C.||as|
After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR97393. Bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, Russo RBW, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF/F, dark patina, red earthen deposits, porous, scratches, broken - 1/5 missing, weight 17.973 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 270o, Hispania, Cordoba mint, summer 46 - spring 45 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, I (mark of value) right, IMP below (off flan); ex Soler y Llach (Barcelona); $115.00 (€94.30)
 


Roman Republic, Anonymous, Second Punic War, 211 - 206 B.C.

|211-100| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |Second| |Punic| |War,| |211| |-| |206| |B.C.||as|
Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88221. Bronze as, Crawford 56/2, Sydenham 143, BMCRR Rome 373 ff., SRCV I 627, F, green patina, crack, porous, weight 29.386 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, countermark: head right in round punch; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $100.00 (€82.00)
 




  



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REFERENCES

Schaaff, Ulrich. Münzen der römischen Kaiserzeit mit Schiffsdarstellungen im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum. (Munich, 2003).

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