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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Tripolis||View Options:  |  |  | 

Tripolis, Phoenicia (Tripoli, Lebanon)

Aurelian established the Tripolis mint, c. 274 A.D., which minted antoniniani and a few aurei types until it closed during the join reign of Diocletian and Maximian, c. 287 A.D. The Tripolis coins of Aurelian, Tacitus and Probus are not clearly mint-marked to identify Tripolis (most often with "KA" in the exergue). After Probus, Tripolis coins are marked "TR" in the reverse field. There were several cities within the Roman Empire named Tripolis. The most likely city that hosted the Roman mint was the Tripolis south of Antioch, which today is Tripoli, Lebanon. Dates of operation: c. 274 - c. 287. Mintmarks: KA in exergue, TR in center field.

Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
Aurelian established the Tripolis mint, c. 274 A.D., which minted antoniniani and a few aureus types until it closed during the join reign of Diocletian and Maximian, c. 287 A.D. The Tripolis coins of Aurelian, Tacitus and Probus are not clearly mint-marked to identify Tripolis. After Probus, Tripolis coins are marked "TR" in the reverse field. There were several cities within the Roman Empire named Tripolis. The most likely city that hosted the Roman mint was the Tripolis south of Antioch, which today is Tripoli, Lebanon.
RL94816. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 928, Hunter IV 349, Cohen VI 87, SRCV III -, gF, well centered, dark patina, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 4.132 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, c. 276 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), Probus standing right, eagle-tipped scepter in left, with right receiving globe from Jupiter, standing left, long scepter in left hand, crescent in center, KA in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarcer mint; $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.00
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The Roman imperial mint at Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) was only open from 270 to about 286 A.D.
RS65428. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 927, Choice EF, weight 4.004 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Tripolis (Tripoli, Lebanon) mint, obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP• (time of peace and calm), emperor standing right, scepter in left, receiving globe from Jupiter standing left holding scepter surmounted by a wreath, XXI in exergue; full circle centering on both obverse and reverse; scarce mint; SOLD


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

|Tacitus|, |Tacitus,| |25| |September| |275| |-| |June| |276| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RA09638. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 4083 (2 spec.), BnF XII 1815, RIC V-1 -, Hunter IV -, Venèra -, VF, weight 3.98 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, 8th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 2, Dec 275 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), Mars standing left holding branch and spear, shield at feet, H in exergue; very rare; SOLD







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