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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Ostia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ostia (Port of Rome), Italy

Ostia, at the mouth of the Tiber was the sea port for the city of Rome, providing Rome an easy means to enjoying all the riches of foreign lands. Its excellent baths, its good cheer and its healthy site, fanned by the breezes of the Mediterranean, made Ostia a favorite resort with the pleasure-loving Romans. The mint was transferred to Ostia from Carthage and then transferred from Ostia to Arelate. Dates of operation 308 - 313 A.D. Mintmarks: MOST, OST.


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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The name Ostia was derived from the Latin "ostium" - river mouth. At the mouth of the River Tiber, Ostia was Rome's seaport. Construction of the port facilities began under Claudius and was likely completed just before this sestertius was struck in 64 A.D. Trajan and Hadrian expanded the facilities. The port was abandoned due to silting and now lies 3 km from the sea. The site is noted for the excellent preservation of its ancient buildings, magnificent frescoes and impressive mosaics.
SH86120. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 178, BMCRE I 131, Mac Dowall WCN 120, BnF II 299, Hunter I 39, Cohen I 37, SRCV 1953, VF, well centered, nice portrait, near black patina, scratches on obverse lower right field, some porosity and tiny pitting, weight 26.031 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate bust right, wearing aegis; reverse AVGVSTI above, S - C divided by POR OST below, bird's-eye view Ostia harbor: pharos lighthouse with Neptune statue on top at far side center; crescent-shaped pier with building and figure sacrificing at far end, crescent-shaped row of breakwaters or slips on right with figure seated on rock at far end, 7 ships within port; river god Tiber reclining left holding rudder and dolphin below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 195 (7 Mar 2011), lot 405; an attractive example of a highly desired type!; SOLD


Romulus, Son of Maxentius, Died 309 or 310 A.D.

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From the Prof. Henry H. Armstrong collection. In 1910, when he purchased this coin, Professor Armstrong lived in Rome working as a Research Associate of the Carnegie Institution in Archaeology teaching at the American School for Classical Studies. From 1918 until his death in 1935 he taught at Beloit College as head of the Department of Romance Languages. Nicknamed "Sparky" by the students, his death after a two-week illness came as a shock to the college. His coins, inherited by his son, sat in a cigar box for the next 74 years.
SH41430. Billon follis, RIC VI Ostia 34, Cohen VII 6, SRCV IV 15050, Hunter V 7 - 8 var. (officina), VF, weight 5.758 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, bare head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIA, Sepulcher of Divus Romulus, brick facade, dome-shaped roof, no columns, right door open, surmounted by eagle with spread wings, MOSTP in exergue; from the Prof. Henry H. Armstrong collection, handwritten envelope notes, "Purchase, 1909 - 1910"; SOLD


Maximian, 285 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D., Commemorative issued by Maxentius

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The Temple of Divus Romulus on the Via Sacra, and adjoining the Basilica Maxentius, was unfinished at the time of the usurper Maxentius' downfall in 312 A.D. Both structures were completed under Constantine. The temple presumably was dedicated to the founder of the city rather than to Maxentius' son.
SH34671. Billon follis, RIC VI Ostia 26, Cohen VI 17, SRCV IV 15055, VF, weight 5.394 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - Oct 312 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXENTIVS DIVO MAXIMIANO PATRI, veiled head right; reverse AETERNA MEMORIA, domed hexastyle shrine, eagle on top with head left and wings open, right door ajar, MOSTT in exergue; ex Beast Coins architecture collection; rare; SOLD


Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

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This interesting reverse includes two sets of twin brothers; Romulus and Remus suckling the she-wolf are flanked by the Disocuri twins Castor and Pollux, with their horses.
RB73599. Billon follis, Hunter V 26 (also 4th officina), RIC VI Ostia 16, Cohen VII 10, SRCV IV 14976, Choice aEF, perfect centering, some silvering remaining, weight 6.421 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, 308 - 310 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right, bare right shoulder from behind; reverse AETERNITAS AVG N, Castor and Pollux, each with star above cap, naked except chlamys over shoulder, leaning on scepter with outer arm, holding bridled horse with inner hand, she-wolf suckling twins in center, MOST∆ in exergue; SOLD


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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A signum was the standard, the military emblem, for each cohort or century in a legion. The signum had a number of phalarae (disks or medallions) along with a number of other elements mounted on a pole. The pole could be topped with a leaf-shaped spear head or a manus (open human hand) image denoting the oath of loyalty taken by the soldiers. It sometimes included a representation of a wreath, probably denoting an honour or award. The signum was carried by the units' signifer. The task of carrying the signum in battle was dangerous, as the soldier had to stand in the first rank and could carry only a small buckler. It was that banner that the men from each individual century would rally around. A soldier could also gain the position of discentes signiferorum, or standard bearer in training. If the signifer was lost in battle, the whole unit was dishonored.
RL85733. Billon follis, RIC VI Ostia 98 (S), SRCV IV 16129, Cohen VII 559, Hunter V 230, gVF, traces of silvering, light marks, weight 4.043 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP C CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, three standards, vexillum on left topped with a hand, aquila in center with ensign and topped with an with eagle left, signum on right topped with a wreath, MOSTS in exergue; Numismatik Lanz MŁnchen, auction 162 (6 Jun 2016), lot 388 (unsold with an estimate of €250); rare; SOLD


Romulus, Son of Maxentius, Died 309 A.D.

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David Sear identifies this simple round building without columns as the Sepulcher of Divus Romulus. The ruins of this tomb, which are sometimes erroneously called the stables of the Circus of Caracalla, are situated in a large quadrilateral enclosure forming part of the villa of Maxentius on the Appian way, about one mile from the gate of S. Sebastian.
SH04243. Billon half follis, RIC VI Ostia 59, Cohen VII 9, SRCV IV 15051, Hunter V 9 - 10 var. (officina), VF, weight 1.82 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, bare head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Sepulcher of Divus Romulus, brick facade, dome-shaped roof, no columns, right door open, surmounted by eagle with spread wings, MOSTS in exergue; from the Aiello Collection; scarce; SOLD


Romulus, Son of Maxentius, Died 309 A.D.

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David Sear identifies this simple round building without columns as the Sepulcher of Divus Romulus. The ruins of this tomb, which are sometimes erroneously called the stables of the Circus of Caracalla, are situated in a large quadrilateral enclosure forming part of the villa of Maxentius on the Appian way, about one mile from the gate of S. Sebastian.
RT84362. Billon half follis, Hunter V 8, RIC VI Ostia 59, Cohen VII 9, SRCV IV 15051, gF, well centered, porous, weight 5.949 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, bare head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Sepulcher of Divus Romulus, brick facade, dome-shaped roof, no columns, right door open, surmounted by eagle with spread wings, MOSTT in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

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Maxentius, the son of Maximinian, was made in rebellion against Severus II. He invited his father, who had abdicated, to resume rule. Although declared a public enemy at the Conference of Carnutum, he ruled Italy until at the Battle of Milvian Bridge he fell and drowned in the Tiber. His army was defeated by Constantine.
RB04240. Billon half follis, RIC VI Ostia 61, Hunter V 41 var. (2nd officina), cf. SRCV IV 15035 (Rome), Choice VF, weight 3.26 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, 309 - 312 A.D.; obverse MAXENTIVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse VICTORIA AETERNA AVG N (the eternal victory of our emperor), Victory standing right, left foot on base of cippus supporting shield on which she inscribes VOT / X, captive seated left, MOSTP in exergue; from the Aiello Collection; SOLD


Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

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Maxentius, the son of Maximinian, was made in rebellion against Severus II. He invited his father, who had abdicated, to resume rule. Although declared a public enemy at the Conference of Carnutum, he ruled Italy until at the Battle of Milvian Bridge he fell and drowned in the Tiber. His army was defeated by Constantine.
RL74570. Billon half follis, RIC VI Ostia 61, Hunter V 41 var. (2nd officina), cf. SRCV IV 15035 (Rome), Choice aVF, full circles strike on a broad flan, weight 3.362 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, 309 - 312 A.D.; obverse MAXENTIVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse VICTORIA AETERNA AVG N (the eternal victory of our emperor), Victory standing right, left foot on base of cippus supporting shield on which she inscribes VOT / X, captive seated left, MOSTP in exergue; SOLD


Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

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On 11 November 308, attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, at the Congress of Carnuntum, the Tetrarchy declared Maxentius a public enemy, Licinius was proclaimed Augustus, and Constantine I was made Caesar of Britain and Gaul.
RB34863. Billon follis, Hunter V 28, RIC VI Ostia 35, Cohen VII 5, SRCV IV 14975, gVF, weight 7.741 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, 309 - 28 Oct 312 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right, bare right shoulder from behind; reverse AETERNITAS AVG N, Castor and Pollux, each with star above cap, naked except chlamys over shoulder, leaning on scepter with outer arm, holding bridled horse with inner hand, MOSTP in exergue; SOLD




  




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Ostia