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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Londinium||View Options:  |  |  | 

Londinium (London, England)

Londinium was established on the site of the City of London around 43 A.D. It was sacked in 60 A.D. by the Iceni led by queen Boudica, but quickly rebuilt. At the end of the 1st century, Londinium was a cosmopolitan community of merchants from across the Empire and the capital of Roman Britain. In 286, the usurper Carausius declared himself the Emperor of Britain. In 296, Rome invaded and reclaimed Britain from his successor Allectus. Twice British legions rebelled and elected their own emperors, Magnus Maximus in 382 and Constantine III, in 407. Both crossed the channel with their legions and were defeated, leaving Britain largely unprotected. As the Empire declined, Britain became increasingly isolated. In 410, the Romano-British authorities appealed to Honorius for help. He replied that the Britons would have to look after their own defenses, meaning Roman occupation of Britain had ended. Britain was increasingly vulnerable to attack by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisii. By the middle 5th century only a small number of wealthy families maintained a Roman lifestyle. At the end of the 5th century the city was largely an uninhabited ruin. Mint dates of operation: 287 - 325 and 383 - 388. Mintmarks: AVG, AVGOB, AVGPS, L, LD, LG, LI, LN, LON, LVG, LVGD, LVGPS, ML, MLL, MLN, MSL, PLN, PLON. Londinium was renamed Augusta about 325 A.D. Coins minted under Magnus Maximus, 383 - 387, use AVG mintmarks.Londinium

Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||follis| |(large)|
Hubert Cloke, co-author of The London Mint of Constantius & Constantine informed us, "The plate coin in my collection (ex Freeman and Sear) is die linked to your coin. In writing our book Lee Toone and I noted another example in the Domqueur hoard. I know of another example in an as yet unpublished French hoard." This coin is then the fourth specimen known to him.
RT96907. Billon follis (large), Cloke-Toone 4.03.012 (same dies), Domqueur Hoard 1278 (pl. XVIII), RIC VI Londinium 50 (R), Cohen VI 169, Hunter V -, SRCV IV -, Mantis ANSCD -, Choice gVF, well centered, nice portrait, bare-copper porous surfaces, weight 9.757 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 1 May 305 - spring 307 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P F IN AVG (Imperator Maximianus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus), laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from front; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius of the Roman people standing left, naked except for chlamys over shoulder, kalathos on head, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; extremely rare; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Although references lists numerous varieties of Providentia reverses, this particular reverse, with rudder, PROVID AVG, and no mint marks is not listed in the references examined and we were unable to find another example online.

RIC notes that London issued coins without mint marks in 287 A.D. As this was the beginning of "British Empire" coinage, coins were often irregular and overstruck on older coins.
RA07649. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 -, Webb Carausius -, SRCV IV -, Hunter IV -, Cohen VII -, gVF, fine light green patina, and exotic "British" style, extremely rare, possibly unpublished or unique, weight 3.85 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. mid 286 - early/mid 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, early reign moustache portrait type; reverse PROVID AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left, rudder in right hand, globe left of rudder, cornucopia in right hand; from the Scott Collection; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA04156. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 101 var., VF+, bold portrait, weight 2.92 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 288 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, L left, ML in exergue; from the Aiello Collection; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

|Crispus|, |Crispus,| |Caesar,| |1| |March| |317| |-| |326| |A.D.||centenionalis|
On 3 July 324, at Adrianople, Constantine defeated Licinius forcing him to retreat to Byzantium. Crispus destroyed Licinius' fleet at the Battle of Hellespont in the Dardanelles, allowing his father to cross over the Bosporus and besiege Licinius. On 18 September, Constantine I decisively defeated Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis and became sole emperor.
RL90695. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 279, Cohen VII 27, SRCV IV 16726, Choice EF, centered, interesting decoration on shield, traces of silvering, weight 3.008 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 135o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOBIL C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield; reverse BEAT TRA-NQLITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLON in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

|Crispus|, |Crispus,| |Caesar,| |1| |March| |317| |-| |326| |A.D.||centenionalis|
In 323, Constantine the Great defeated invading Goths and Sarmatians north of the Danube in Dacia, and claimed the title Sarmaticus Maximus.
RL90704. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 372, SRCV IV 16731, Cohen VII 22, Choice EF, bold sharp strike, excellent detail, weight 4.037 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear over shoulder in right, shield on left shoulder; reverse BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by celestial globe, three stars above, STR in exergue; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Legio VIII Augusta was created by Pompey. It fought the Gallic Wars for Caesar and crossed the Rubicon with him; however, at Thapsus it fought against him. The legion fought in Egypt and later participated in the invasion of Britain. In 69 A.D. it declared for Vitellius. Soon after, it moved to the Rhine frontier where they served for more than 400 years. An inscription from 371 A.D. recorded the legion was then stationed at Argentoratum (Strasbourg). There may have been a detachment serving in Britain at the time of Carausius' revolt. Septimius Severus used the legion in his Parthian war.
RA73239. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 77 (R2); Hunter IV 11; Webb Carausius 97 - 99; Cohen VII 145, F, green patina, slightly off center on a broad oval flan, earthen deposits, light marks, areas of light corrosion, weight 4.236 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 45o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 291 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse LEG VIII AVG, bull standing right, ML in exergue (or blank); from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

|Crispus|, |Crispus,| |Caesar,| |1| |March| |317| |-| |326| |A.D.||centenionalis|
On 3 July 324, at Adrianople, Constantine defeated Licinius forcing him to retreat to Byzantium. Crispus destroyed Licinius' fleet at the Battle of Hellespont in the Dardanelles, allowing his father to cross over the Bosporus and besiege Licinius. On 18 September, Constantine I decisively defeated Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis and became sole emperor.
RL90682. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 281, Cohen VII 28, SRCV IV 16726, Choice EF, green patina, perfect centering, small die break on reverse at 8:00, weight 4.026 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOBIL C, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield; reverse BEAT TRANQLITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLON in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

|Crispus|, |Crispus,| |Caesar,| |1| |March| |317| |-| |326| |A.D.||centenionalis|
On 3 July 324, at Adrianople, Constantine defeated Licinius forcing him to retreat to Byzantium. Crispus destroyed Licinius' fleet at the Battle of Hellespont in the Dardanelles, allowing his father to cross over the Bosporus and besiege Licinius. On 18 September, Constantine I decisively defeated Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis and became sole emperor.
RL76316. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 275, Hunter V 2, Cohen VII 29, SRCV IV 16726, gVF, fantastic portrait with ornate helmet, both sides slightly off-center, weight 3.223 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOBIL C, helmeted and cuirassed bust left; reverse BEAT TRA-NQLITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLON in exergue; SOLD


Romano-British Empire, Allectus, Summer 293 - 296 A.D.

|Allectus|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Allectus,| |Summer| |293| |-| |296| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In The British Usurpers Carausius & Allectus, P.J. Casey writes, "It should be observed the employment of mintmarks and control symbols in a rational and systematic manner is an innovation of the coinage of Carausius which was subsequently adopted throughout the Roman coinage. Why it was felt necessary to introduce such a radical system of record is not known: if, as will be argued, Allectus was the finance minister of the Carausian administration, it is to him that this innovation should be credited."
RB73842. Bronze antoninianus, Burnett Allectus 11, Hunter IV 7, RIC V-2 33, Cohen 37, SRCV IV 13825 var. (S - A across field), aVF, well centered, corrosion, encrustations, weight 3.379 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, summer 293 - 294; obverse IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from front; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing slightly left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, S - P across field, ML in exergue; SOLD


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

|Diocletian|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.||follis| |(large)|
The obverse dedicates the coin, "to our lord Diocletian the most pious and fortunate senior emperor." Quies is the personification of rest and retirement and this reverse is dedicated to the rest and retirement of Diocletian and Maximian after their abdication in 305 A.D.
RL74446. Billon follis (large), RIC VI Londinium 98, Cohen VI 428, SRCV IV 12955, gVF, well centered, light corrosion primarily on the reverse, weight 8.304 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London) mint, 3rd emission, 307 A.D.; obverse D N DIOCLETIANO P F S AVG, laureate bust right, wearing imperial mantle, olive branch in right hand, mappa in left hand; reverse QVIES AVGG, Quies standing half left, branch downward in right hand, long scepter in left hand, PLN in exergue; ex William B. Porter Collection; SOLD







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