Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Londinium||View Options:  |  |  |   

Londinium (London, England)

Londinium was established on the site of the City of London around 43 A.D. It was sacked in 60 A.D. by the Iceni led by queen Boudica, but quickly rebuilt. At the end of the 1st century, Londinium was a cosmopolitan community of merchants from across the Empire and the capital of Roman Britain. In 286, the usurper Carausius declared himself the Emperor of Britain. In 296, Rome invaded and reclaimed Britain from his successor Allectus. Twice British legions rebelled and elected their own emperors, Magnus Maximus in 382 and Constantine III, in 407. Both crossed the channel with their legions and were defeated, leaving Britain largely unprotected. As the Empire declined, Britain became increasingly isolated. In 410, the Romano-British authorities appealed to Honorius for help. He replied that the Britons would have to look after their own defenses, meaning Roman occupation of Britain had ended. Britain was increasingly vulnerable to attack by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisii. By the middle 5th century only a small number of wealthy families maintained a Roman lifestyle. At the end of the 5th century the city was largely an uninhabited ruin. Mint dates of operation: 287 - 325 and 383 - 388. Mintmarks: AVG, AVGOB, AVGPS, L, LD, LG, LI, LN, LON, LVG, LVGD, LVGPS, ML, MLL, MLN, MSL, PLN, PLON. Londinium was renamed Augusta about 325 A.D. Coins minted under Magnus Maximus, 383 - 387, use AVG mintmarks.Londinium

Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius was originally a fleet commander sent by the first Tetrarchs to rid the Northern seas of Saxon and Frankish pirates. He soon turned to piracy himself, before fleeing to Britain and declaring himself emperor. His natural cunning enabled him to resist all attempts to dislodge him. In 293 Constantius I captured his continental stronghold of Boulogne. Soon after Carausius was murdered by his chief minister Allectus.
RA73481. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 762 (R), Webb Carausius -, King Unmarked -, Hunter IV -, Cohen VII -, SRCV IV -, Bourne Carausius -, Linchmere -, Bicester -, gF/aF, green patina, tight flan, weight 4.137 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 225o, unmarked (London?) mint, c. mid 286 - 287 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, early reign 'moustache' portrait; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Emperor standing right clasping hands with Concordia, no mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In The Reign and Coinage of Carausius, Percy Webb wrote that for Carausius, "...the type Providentia appears with some twenty-four varieties of reverse legend, while the joint effect of obverse and reverse variations of legend and type is to produce upwards of eighty varieties of coins dedicated to that divinity."
RA73503. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 152 (R2), SRCV IV 13697, Webb Carausius 178, Bourne 33, Askew 183, Hunter IV - (p. ccii), aVF, good portrait, mottled green patina, tight flan, rough, pitting smoothed to remove corrosion, weight 3.526 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 292 - 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVIDEN AVGGG (the foresight of the three emperors), Providentia standing left with baton and cornucopia, globe at feet left, S - P across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $135.00 SALE |PRICE| $122.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. This coin, dedicated to the health of the emperor, probably indicates the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RA73274. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 162 (R), Webb Carausius 181, Bourne Carausius -, Linchmere -, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, Carausian Hoard -, aVF, dark patina, nice portrait, weak legends, scratches, corrosion, weight 3.683 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. late 289 - 291; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing left, with right hand feeding snake rising from altar at her feet, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, B - E across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Laetitia is the Roman goddess of gaiety and joy, her name deriving from the root word laeta, meaning happy. She is typically depicted on coinage with a wreath in her right hand, and a scepter, a rudder, or an anchor in her left hand. On the coins of empresses, Laetitia may signal a birth in the Imperial family.
RA73263. Billon antoninianus, Linchmere p. 216, 55 (3 spec.), RIC V-2 50 (S), Webb Carausius -, Bourne Carausius -, Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, Burton Latimer -, Carausian Hoard -, VF, some silvering, scratches, some corrosion, reverse legend weak, weight 4.601 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 288 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse LAETITIA AVG (the joy of the Emperor), Laetitia standing half left, wreath in right hand, anchor or staff in left hand, L in left field, ML in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very scarce; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

|Constantine| |II|, |Constantine| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |March| |or| |April| |340| |A.D.|, |reduced| |follis|
Constantine II was the son of Constantine I, the eldest son with his second wife, Fausta. He was born in Arles (which was renamed Constantia in his honor in 328, explaining the CON mintmarks for Arles) and was made Caesar before he was a year old in 316 A.D. Upon his father's death, Constantine II inherited the Western part of the empire. After quarreling with his brother Constans, he invaded Constans' territory, only to be killed in an ambush near Aquileia. His coins often include "IVN" in the legend, an abbreviation for junior.
RL89619. Billon reduced follis, RIC VII London 181 (R2), SRCV V 17270, Cohen VII 224, Hunter V 1 var. (cross within wreath on altar), Choice aEF, excellent portrait, centered on a broad flan, green patina, traces of silvering, light earthen deposits, weight 3.412 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 135o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, as caesar, 320 A.D.; obverse FL CL CONSTANTINVS IVN N C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP (joyous victory to the eternal prince), two Victories standing confronted, together holding wreath over altar, VOT / PR in (vows of the Roman People) two lines within wreath, wreath on the front of the altar, PLN in exergue; ex Beast Coins VLPP Collection, ex Lucie Courcy (2006); rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art, Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men. This coin advertises Carausius as the source of hope for the people.
RA73259. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 1010, Webb Carausius 2235, Cohen VII 339, King Unmarked -, SRCV IV -, Hunter IV -, aVF, centered on a broad flan, green patina with red earthen deposits, legends weak, weight 3.311 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 225o, unmarked (Londinium?) mint, c. mid 286 - 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SPES PVBLICA (the hope of the public), Spes walking left, flower in right hand, lifting skirt with left hand, no mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. This coin, dedicated to the health of the emperor, probably indicates the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RA73489. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 165 (S), Webb Carausius 195, Bourne Carausius -, Linchmere -, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, Carausian Hoard -, F, green patina, flan cracks, ragged flan, corrosion, encrustations, weight 3.219 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. late 289 - 291; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (the health of the public), Salus standing right, feeding snake held in right hand, from patera held in left hand, B - E across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Although the exergue is off flan, based on the portrait style, it is likely this is an early issue without a mintmark (unmarked). It may have been struck at a mint traveling with Carausius or perhaps at London.
RA73490. Billon antoninianus, cf. RIC V-2 983, Webb Carausius 1102, Hunter IV 75, Cohen VII 310, Linchmere Hoard 1102 (1 spec.), King Unmarked 13, SRCV IV -, Bicester -, F, nice green patina, centered on a crowded flan, minor edge chipping, weight 2.590 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 45o, London(?) mint, c. mid 286 - 287 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right, early reign 'moustache' portrait; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing slightly left, head left, from patera in right hand feeding snake rising from altar, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
Six sales of this type are recorded on coin archives for the last two decades. In 2018 a gVF specimen sold for $2648 plus fees and in 2017 a Fine specimen sold for $576 plus fees.
RA73480. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 15, RIC V-2 11 (R2), Linchmere Hoard 14 var. (no captive, emperor holds scepter), Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, Burton -, Bourne -, et al. -, Fair, rough, weight 2.096 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 287 - 288 A.D.; obverse CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right hand over right shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse ADVENTVS AVG (arrival of the Emperor), emperor riding horse left, wearing military garb, raising right hand, captive with hands bound behind seated left before horse, ML in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.|, |centenionalis|
The reverse legend abbreviates, Victoriae Laetae Principium Perpertua, which translates, "Joyous victory to the eternal Prince." VOT P R on the shield abbreviates, Vota Populi Romani, which translates, "Vows (prayers) of the Roman people." RIC notes the design on the altar gradually becomes more elaborate (more pellets) throughout this London issue. The first variety was a plain rhombus. This design with five pellets was the last altar variation of the issue.
RL89675. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 161 (R1), Hunter V -, SRCV IV -, Cohen VII -, VF, well centered and struck with full legends, dark toning with some silvering, light marks, weight 2.866 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 319 - 320 A.D.; obverse CONSTA-NTINVS AVG, helmeted, laureate, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP (Joyous victory to the eternal Prince), two Victories standing confronted, together holding shield inscribed VOT / P R (vows of the Roman people) over altar, altar ornamented with a rhombus with a pellet in the center and four pellets around, PLN in exergue; ex Beast Coins VLPP Collection, ex Nemesis Coins (2004); scarce; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Page created in 0.548 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity