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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Military| ▸ |Arms & Armor||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins Featuring Arms and Armor
Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|
Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.
JD110301. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6227; Meshorer TJC 73; BMC Palestine p. 232, 10; SGICV 5539; RPC I 4917, VF, well centered, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, prominent sprue cuts, reverse edge beveled, weight 2.272 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPΩΔOY (Greek: of Herod), bunch of grapes, leaf on left; reverse EΘNOPXOY (Greek: Ethnarch), tall helmet with crest and neck straps viewed from the front, small caduceus in lower left field; from an Israeli collection; $180.00 (165.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.||AE| |12|
David Hendin identifies the mint city as Jerusalem. Some numismatists have attributed this type to Askalon. Houghton and Lorber attribute it to an uncertain mint in southern Koile-Syria.
GY111516. Bronze AE 12, Houghton-Lorber II 2122, SNG Spaer 2095, Houghton CSE 819, Hendin 6166 (Jerusalem mint), HGC 9 1111, VF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, rev. off center, weight 1.108 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 45o, southern Koile-Syria (?, uncertain) mint, 138 - 137 B.C.; obverse crested Boeotian helmet with cheek guards; reverse ANTIOXOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, aphlaston; this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM, ex Zuzim Inc. (Isadore Goldstein, Brooklyn, NY); $120.00 (110.40)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Kition, Cyprus

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.,| |Kition,| |Cyprus||quarter| |unit|
Kition, also known by its Latin name Citium, was a city-kingdom on the southern coast of Cyprus (present-day Larnaca). According to local tradition, it was established in the 13th century B.C. by Greek (Achaean) settlers, after the Trojan war. Its most famous resident was Zeno of Citium, born c. 334 B.C. in Citium and founder of the Stoic school of philosophy which he taught in Athens from about 300 B.C.
GB111031. Bronze quarter unit, Price 3111A; cf. Tziambazis 6 (full unit); BMC Cyprus -, VF, glossy green patina, tight flan, weight 1.289 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 180o, Kition (Larnaca, Cyprus) mint, c. 325 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse bow and quiver on left, AΛEΞANΔPOY downward in center, knobby club with handle up on right, uncertain device outer left; very rare; $110.00 (101.20)


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

|Antonius| |Felix|, |Judaea,| |Antonius| |Felix,| |Roman| |Procurator| |Under| |Claudius| |and| |Nero,| |52| |-| |60| |A.D.||prutah|
The palm depicted is, of course, the date palm. The tree was a symbol of Judea where palm trees grow in greater numbers than the surrounding areas (the Romans also used it as a symbol of Judea on Judaea Capta coins). The palm also symbolized abundance and plenty, dignity, royal honor, jubilation and victory, and was used in religious processions
JD111329. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6377; Meshorer TJC 340; Sofaer 59; BMC Palestine p. 264, 21; RPC I 4971, aVF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, light corrosion, reverse edge beveled, prominent sprue cut, weight 2.487 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, under Nero, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two crossed oblong shields with two crossed spears on far side; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - IΔ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) flanking trunk; $110.00 (101.20)


German States, Margraviate of Brandenburg, Friedrich II, 1440 - 1470

|Germany|, |German| |States,| |Margraviate| |of| |Brandenburg,| |Friedrich| |II,| |1440| |-| |1470||Hohlpfennig| |Bracteate|
Frederick II of Brandenburg was a Prince-elector of the Margraviate of Brandenburg from 1440 until his abdication in 1470, and was a member of the House of Hohenzollern.
ME92076. Silver Hohlpfennig Bracteate, Bahrfeldt 16a, Tewes H60c, Saurma 4819, aEF, toned, tiny edge crack, weight 0.274 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, Frankfurt (Oder) mint, 1440 - 1470; obverse helmet with crest of six feathers on top, within rayed border; reverse incuse of obverse; ex Mnzenhandlung W. Rittig (Schwelm, Germany); $100.00 (92.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.||1/2| |unit|
Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
GB111207. Bronze 1/2 unit, Price 2072, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, some corrosion, light scrape on rev., weight 3.655 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, perhaps Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, struck under Asandros, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield, pellet at boss center with three rings around, with five crescents around,; reverse crested Macedonian officer's helmet facing, with ear flaps, stalk of grain lower left, K lower right; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $100.00 (92.00)


Mesembria, Thrace, 300 - 250 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |20|NEW
The wheel on the reverse is depicted with a degree of perspective, which is unusual on ancient coins.

(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GB111740. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 229, SNG Cop 658, SNG BM 276 var. (helmet left), aVF, weight 5.353 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 90o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse Thracian helmet with cheek guard right; reverse wheel with hub and four spokes (or shield?), METAM/BPIANΩN (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) divided, above and below; rare; $90.00 (82.80)


Mesembria, Thrace, 300 - 250 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |20|
The wheel on the reverse is depicted with a degree of perspective, which is unusual on ancient coins.

(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GB98883. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 229, SNG Cop 658, SNG BM 276 var. (helmet left), gF, weight 6.780 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse Thracian helmet with cheek guard right; reverse wheel with hub and four spokes, METAM/BPIANΩN (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) divided, above and below; rare; $80.00 (73.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Diodotus Tryphon, 142 - 138 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Diodotus| |Tryphon,| |142| |-| |138| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Tryphon, a general, betrayed and deposed the child king Antiochus VI and seized power for himself in Coele-Syria. He reinstated Hasmonean rule in Judea in exchange for which Jewish armies under the High Priest Jonathan marched against his rival Demetrius. But Tryphon betrayed Jonathan taking him prisoner at a "friendly" meeting and marching his army to Judaea. Jonathan's brother, Simon Maccabaeus, was ready for battle, preventing invasion. Tryphon promised to free Jonathan in exchange for one hundred talents and Jonathan's two sons as hostages. Simon did not trust Tryphon, but he complied so he could not be accused of his brother's death. As expected, Jonathan was executed.Tryphon committed suicide after he was defeated by Antiochus VII.
GY98894. Bronze AE 18, Houghton-Lorber II 2034(2)e, SNG Spaer 1830, Babelon Rois 1052, Houghton CSE 261, HGC 9 1061 (S), VF/F, dark green patina, central cavities, weight 4.842 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 142 - 138 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, diadem ends falling straight behind; reverse spiked Macedonian helmet left, with cheek guards, adorned with a wild goat's horn above the visor, star (control) left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / TPYΦΩNOΣ in two downward lines on the right, AYTOKPATOPOΣ downward on left; $80.00 (73.60)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 105 - 85 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Amisos,| |Pontos,| |c.| |105| |-| |85| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. When this coin was struck Amisos was part of the Kingdom of Pontus. The city came under Roman control in 47 B.C. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB99018. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 155, SNG Stancomb 680; HGC 7 241; SNG BM 1165 var. (no right side monograms), BMC Pontus p. 17, 50 var. (same), gVF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, flan adjustment marks, tight flan, mild porosity, weight 8.072 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, struck under Mithradates VI, c. 105 - 85 B.C.; obverse head of Ares right in crested helmet; reverse sword in sheath with strap, AMI-ΣOY divided across field, star in crescent upper left, IB upper right, lower left, monogram lower right; $80.00 (73.60)




  



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