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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros| ▸ |Romulus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Romulus

Romulus and Remus are the mythical twin founders of Rome. Their grandfather was Numitor, king of Alba Longa, a descendant of the Trojan Prince Aeneas and father to their mother, Rhea Silvia. Numitor's brother Amulius deposed him, killed his sons and forced Rhea to become a Vestal Virgin, but Rhea conceived Romulus and Remus by Mars (or Hercules). Amulius exposed the newborns to die but a she-wolf found and suckled them. A shepherd and his wife raised them to manhood. The twins were natural leaders, and acquired many followers. When told their true identities, they killed Amulius, restored Numitor to the throne of Alba Longa and decided to found a new city for themselves. Romulus wished to build the new city on the Palatine Hill but Remus preferred the Aventine Hill. They agreed to determine the site through augury. Romulus received the more favorable signs but each claimed the results in his favor. Remus was killed in the dispute. Romulus named the new city Rome, after himself, and created the Roman Legions and the Roman Senate. Rome's population was swelled by landless refugees and outlaws, mostly men. They abducted women from the neighboring Sabine tribes, which led to war but eventually resulted the Sabines and Romans joining. In later life Romulus became increasingly autocratic, disappeared in mysterious circumstances and was deified as the god Quirinus, the divine persona of the Roman people. Ancient historians had no doubt that Romulus gave his name to the city. Most modern historians believe the mythological narrative is mostly or entirely fiction.

Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D., Laodicea ad Mar, Seleucia and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Diadumenian,| |Mid| |May| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Laodicea| |ad| |Mar,| |Seleucia| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |31|
Laodicea ad Mar (Latakia, Syria) has been inhabited since the second millennium B.C. It was on the Via Maris, a coastal road that ran south from Antioch to Damascus and Beirut. The city was renamed by Seleucus I Nicator in honor of his mother, Laodice and was a major port for the Seleukid Kingdom. Laodicea flourished under Rome and was second only to Antioch in the region. Herod the Great, king of Judaea, furnished Laodicea with an aqueduct, the remains of which stand to the east of the town. The Legio VI Ferrata was probably based in Laodicea.
JD97397. Bronze AE 31, Lindgren-Kovacs 2099, BMC Galatia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Munchen -, SNG Righetti -, aF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, porosity/corrosion, edge split, weight 13.695 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, as caesar, 11 Apr 217 - mid May 218 A.D.; obverse IM M OP ANTONINOS NOB CAES, bare headed, draped and cuirassed bust right seen from the front; reverse ROMAE FEL, she-wolf right suckling Romulus and Remus; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; very rare; $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00
 


|Romulus|, |Romulus,| |Son| |of| |Maxentius,| |Died| |309| |A.D.||half| |follis|
David Sear identifies this simple round building without columns as the Sepulcher of Divus Romulus. The ruins of this tomb, which are sometimes erroneously called the stables of the Circus of Caracalla, are situated in a large quadrilateral enclosure forming part of the villa of Maxentius on the Appian way, about one mile from the gate of S. Sebastian.
RT84362. Billon half follis, Hunter V 8, RIC VI Ostia 59, Cohen VII 9, SRCV IV 15051, gF, well centered, porous, weight 5.949 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, bare head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Sepulcher of Divus Romulus, brick facade, dome-shaped roof, no columns, right door open, surmounted by eagle with spread wings, MOSTT in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||denarius|
Plutarch's Life of Romulus describes Rome's first triumph after Romulus' victory over Acron, king of the Ceninenses who attacked Rome after the rape of the Sabine Women: "...Romulus, that he might perform his vow in the most acceptable manner to Jupiter, and make the pomp of it delightful to the eye of the city, cut down a tall oak which he saw growing in the camp, trimmed to the shape of a trophy, and fastened on it Acron's whole suit of armor disposed in proper form; then he himself, girding his clothes about him, and crowning his head with a laurel garland, his hair gracefully flowing, carried the trophy resting erect upon his right shoulder, and so marched on, singing songs of triumph, and his whole army following after, the citizens all receiving him with acclamations of joy and wonder. The procession of this day was the origin and model of all after triumphs..."
RS87769. Silver denarius, RIC II 266f (S), RSC II 1316b, BMCRE III 712, Hunter II 236, Strack II 263, SRCV II 3538 var. (slight drapery), Choice EF, light tone, much luster, radiating flow lines, some die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.397 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse ROMVLO CONDITORI (to Romulus the founder), Romulus in military dress advancing right, transverse spear in right hand, spolia opima (trophy of captured arms) in left hand over left shoulder; ex Aureo & Calico, Roma Aeterna Collection auction (09 Nov 2017), lot 71; scarce; SOLD







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