Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 2 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities 10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 2 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |    Purim||View Options:  |  |  | 

Purim

After the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah, the Jews were taken into the seventy-year Babylonian captivity. When ancient Persia took control of Babylon, Haman, the royal vizier, convinced King Ahasuerus to destroy all the Jews. Esther, Ahasuerus's queen and, unknown to him, a Jew, interceded on behalf of her people. By law the King could not rescind the order to slaughter the Jews, so he issued a second decree that permitted the Jews to defend themselves with armed force. The King replaced Haman with Mordecai, a palace official, cousin and foster parent of Esther. The Jews defeated Haman, killing his ten sons that were leading the attacks, and then hanged Haman. The day after the battle was designated as a day of feasting and rejoicing. Scholars identify King Ahasuerus as the historical king Xerxes I, 486 - 465 BCE. Xerxes is the Greek version of his name but the Babylonians knew him as Khshayarsha. The Hebrew name Ahasuerus, appears to be derived from Khshayarsha, with the letter A added at the beginning.

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||sestertius|
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB110108. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 2255, BMCRE III 1497, Cohen II 620, SRCV II 3595, Strack II 663, Hunter II 517 var. (slight drapery), aF, porosity/light corrosion, weight 24.130 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, olive branch in right hand, long caduceus in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across the field; from Shawn Caza former diplomat, author of A Handbook of Late Roman Coins (Spink, 2021), collection assembled during postings and international travel; ex Anciennes Collections (Clermont Ferrand, France); $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, Oct 253 - Sep 268 A.D

|Troas|, |Alexandreia| |Troas,| |Troas,| |Oct| |253| |-| |Sep| |268| |A.D||AE| |22|
Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
RP112155. Bronze AE 22, RPC Online IX 518 (4 spec.); Bellinger A482; BMC Troas p. 14, 43 & pl. IV, 8; Winterthur 2703; SNG Mn -; SNGvA -, gF, nice green patina, oval flan, weight 4.410 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 45o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - Sep 268 A.D; obverse AVG ALEX TRO, draped bust of Tyche right, vexillum inscribed AV CO behind; reverse COL AV TROA, Apollo standing left, nude, branch downward in right hand, resting left hand on hip, right foot on omphalos, tree behind; from Shawn Caza former diplomat, author of A Handbook of Late Roman Coins (Spink, 2021), collection assembled during postings and international travel; ex Dorotheum Vienna; very rare; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

|Elagabalus|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.||denarius|
Curtis Clay notes, one of Elagabalus' four emperor sacrificing types is dated, and the horn disappears from its obverse soon after the beginning of TR P V on 10 Dec. 221. This coin, without the horn thus dates c. mid-Jan. to his death 11 March 222.
MA112140. Silver denarius, RSC III 61b, Eauze 356 (10 spec.), BMCRE V 209, RIC IV 88 (notes usually horned), SRCV II 7518 var. (horned), aF, weight 2.598 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. mid-Jan - 11 Mar 222; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and bearded bust right, no horn; reverse INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing half left, branch in left, offering from patera over altar in right, recumbent bull behind altar, star upper left; from Shawn Caza former diplomat, author of A Handbook of Late Roman Coins (Spink, 2021), collection assembled during postings and international travel; ex Marc Walter Numismatik (Vienna); $26.76 (24.62)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

|Severus| |Alexander|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.||denarius|
Severus Alexander was promoted from Caesar to Augustus after his cousin Elagabalus was murdered. He was dominated by his mother, but his reign brought economic prosperity and military success against the barbarians. Mutinous soldiers led by Maximinus I murdered him and his mother. This coin was struck with a reverse die copied from a coin of Elagabalus.
RA112151. Silver denarius, RSC III 470, RIC IV 271, SRCV II 7918, BMCRE VI 1063 note, aF, dark toning, part of edge ragged, weight 2.615 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 223 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse PONTIF MAX TR P II COS II P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for two years, consul for the second time, father of the country), Roma seated left on throne, Victory in extended right hand, reversed spear in left hand, round shield rests on the ground against the near side of throne; from Shawn Caza former diplomat, author of A Handbook of Late Roman Coins (Spink, 2021), collection assembled during postings and international travel; ex Marc Walter Numismatik (Vienna); scarce; $5.50 (5.06)


Islamic, Abbasid Caliphate, Al-Qahir, Second Reign, AH 320 - 322, 932 - 934 A.D.

|| || || || |Purim|, |Islamic,| |Abbasid| |Caliphate,| |Al-Qahir,| |Second| |Reign,| |AH| |320| |-| |322,| |932| |-| |934| |A.D.||dinar|
Al Qahir appointed himself caliph after his brother al-Muqtadir died. He was unforgiving and cruel. After two years his ministers had enough. He was imprisoned, blinded and replaced by his nephew al-Radi, a son of al-Muqtadir.

Hamedan, Iran (ancient Ecbatana), is believed to be among the oldest cities in the world. Hamadan was established by the Medes and was the capital of the Median empire. It then became one of several capital cities of the Achaemenid Dynasty. Hamadan is mentioned in the biblical book of Ezra as the place where a scroll was found giving the Jews permission from King Darius to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem (Ezra 6:2). Because it is a mile above sea level, it was a good place to preserve leather documents. The tomb in the photo on the right, located in Hamadan, is believed by some to hold the remains of the biblical Esther and her cousin Mordechai.
Hamadan Tomb
SH75698. Gold dinar, Bernardi 277mu (RR), Album 250.2, VF, areas of flat strike, weight 4.104 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Hamadhan mint, AH 321, 233 A.D.; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex CNG e-auction 235, lot 591; rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes I - Darius II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

|| || || || |Purim|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Lydia,| |Anatolia,| |Xerxes| |I| |-| |Darius| |II,| |c.| |485| |-| |420| |B.C.||siglos|
After the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah, the Jews were taken into the seventy-year Babylonian captivity. When ancient Persia took control of Babylon, Haman, the royal vizier, convinced King Ahasuerus to destroy all the Jews. Esther, Ahasuerus' queen and, unknown to him, a Jew, interceded on behalf of her people. By law the King could not rescind the order to slaughter the Jews, so he issued a second decree that permitted the Jews to defend themselves with armed force. The King replaced Haman with Mordecai, a palace official, cousin and foster parent of Esther. The Jews defeated Haman, killing his ten sons that were leading the attacks, and then hanged Haman. The day after the battle was designated as a day of feasting and rejoicing. Scholars identify King Ahasuerus as the historical king Xerxes I, 485 - 465 B.C. Xerxes is the Greek version of his name but the Babylonians knew him as Khshayarsha. The Hebrew name Ahasuerus, appears to be derived from Khshayarsha, with the letter A added at the beginning.
GA56975. Silver siglos, Carradice type IIIb (early), pl. XII, 16 ff.; Rosen 673; SGCV II 4682; Carradice NC 1998 pl. 7, 155 ff.; Carradice Price p. 67 and pl. 17, 1 ff., F, banker's mark, weight 5.529 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned; reverse irregular oblong punch; SOLD


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes I - Darius II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

|| || || || |Purim|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Lydia,| |Anatolia,| |Xerxes| |I| |-| |Darius| |II,| |c.| |485| |-| |420| |B.C.||siglos|
After the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah, the Jews were taken into the seventy-year Babylonian captivity. When ancient Persia took control of Babylon, Haman, the royal vizier, convinced King Ahasuerus to destroy all the Jews. Esther, Ahasuerus' queen and, unknown to him, a Jew, interceded on behalf of her people. By law the King could not rescind the order to slaughter the Jews, so he issued a second decree that permitted the Jews to defend themselves with armed force. The King replaced Haman with Mordecai, a palace official, cousin and foster parent of Esther. The Jews defeated Haman, killing his ten sons that were leading the attacks, and then hanged Haman. The day after the battle was designated as a day of feasting and rejoicing. Scholars identify King Ahasuerus as the historical king Xerxes I, 485 - 465 B.C. Xerxes is the Greek version of his name but the Babylonians knew him as Khshayarsha. The Hebrew name Ahasuerus, appears to be derived from Khshayarsha, with the letter A added at the beginning.
GS71687. Silver siglos, Carradice type IIIb (early); Carradice NC 1998 pl. 7, 155 ff.; Rosen 673; SGCV II 4682; Winzer 1.11; Sunrise 25, VF, toned, thin die crack on obverse (from right hand down to ground line), weight 5.414 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned; reverse irregular rectangular punch; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Album, Stephen. A Checklist of Islamic Coins. (Santa Rosa, CA, 2011). Bernardi, G. Arabic Gold Coins. Corpus I. (Trieste, 2010). Carradice, I. Coinage and Administration in the Athenian and Persian Empires. BAR 343. (Oxford, 1987).
Carradice, I. "The Dinar Hoard of Persian Sigloi" in Studies Price. (London, 1998).
Carradice, I. "Two Achaemenid Hoards." in NC 158. (Cambridge, 1998).
Nelson, B., ed. Numismatic Art of Persia. The Sunrise Collection, Part I: Ancient - 650 BC to AD 650. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Noe, S. Two Hoards of Persian Sigloi. ANSNNM 136. (New York, 1956).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Waggoner, N. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).
Winzer, A. Antike portraitmnzen der Perser und Greichen aus vor-hellenistischer Zeit (Zeitraum ca. 510-322 v.Chr.). (March-Hugstetten, 2005).

Catalog current as of Monday, September 25, 2023.
Page created in 1.125 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity