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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ AstarteView Options:  |  |  |   

Astarte

Astarte is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible as the principal goddess of the Phoenicians (Ashtoreth), representing the productive power of nature. In Phoenician mythology, she was a daughter of Sky and Earth and sister of the god El. Astarte was connected with fertility, sexuality, and war. Her symbols were the lion, the horse, the sphinx, the dove, and a star within a circle indicating the planet Venus. Her name is the second name in a Wicca energy chant: "Isis, Astarte, Diana, Hecate, Demeter, Kali, Inanna."


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Phoenicia, Berytos

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Astarte, called "Ashtroth" in Scripture, was the favorite goddess of the Sidonians, Tyrians, Philistines, and Syro-Phoenicians generally. She was associated with the Greek Aphrodite and Roman Venus Genetrix, being believed by the ancients to be the goddess of generation, as well as of beauty. Astarte was chiefly worshiped and appears on the coins of Berytus, Bostra, Sidon, and Tyre. Her image is of a young woman, wearing a tall headdress; and clothed in a tunic, high in the neck- sometimes, not reaching lower than the knees, or sometimes with a longer dress, but with one knee exposed, and one foot planted on a galley's prow.
SH11625. Bronze AE 28, BMC Phoenicia 264, VF, weight 15.583 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Berytos (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, 259 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG FEL BER, Astarte standing facing, foot on galley, cruciform standard in right and aphlaston in left arm, crowned by Nike standing on column right; nice green patina; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Sidon, Phoenicia

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The principal male god of Sidon was Eshmun, a god of healing associated by the Greeks and Romans with Asclepius. However, Astarte, a goddess of fertility, sexuality, and war associated with Aphrodite, was probably considered his superior.
SH59991. Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 1359, VF, weight 12.768 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 40o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 215 - 217 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI ANTWNINOC CE, laureate head right; reverse ∆H MAP E YΠATOC ∆, eagle standing facing, wings open, head and tail left, wreath in beak, cart of Astarte between legs; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Tripolis, Phoenicia

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SH08634. Bronze AE 25, BMC Phoenicia p. 223, 120; SNG Cop 291, gF, weight 12.154 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tripolis mint, 220 - 221 A.D.; obverse AVT KM AVP ANTΩ NINOC, laureate head right; reverse TPI ΠO ΛI TΩN, temple, center arch, two tetrastyle wings, curved roof line from wings to top of pediment, Astarte stands facing in doorway, ΓΛΦ (Seleucid Era year 532) in ex; SOLD


Melita (Mdina, Malta), Under Roman Rule, c. 150 - 146 B.C.

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Melite or Melita was an ancient city located on the site of present-day Mdina, Malta. It began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
GI84544. Bronze AE 26, Calciati III p, 353, 7; Coleiro 3; SNG Cop 463; SNG Dreer 607; SNG Morcom -; SNG Evelpidis I -, F, brown tone, slightly irregular flan, small edge cracks, weight 11.397 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, c. 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse MELITAIWN (downward on right), veiled female (Astarte) head right, with ureus and lotus crown, sign of Tanit combined with caduceus left; reverse Osiris kneeling left on one knee, with four spread wings, two coming out from the upper back, two from the lower back, wearing solar disc crown, scepter in right hand, flail in left hand, wearing pinafore and necklace; rare; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

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The Tyrians paid supreme adoration to Astarte. Josephus records by Hiram, King of Tyre, built a magnificent temple in honor of Ashtaroth (Astarte). This temple and images of the goddess both appear frequently on coins of the Roman colony. Cicero affirms that the goddess, was the Syrian Venus, who was said to have been married to Adonis (lib. iii. De Nat. Deor.).
RP57245. Bronze AE 30, Rouvier 2425; Mionnet Supp. VIII p. 309, 337; BMC Phoenicia p. 280, 424 var. (rev. legend); SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 19.234 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL [AVG], laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL TVR METR, Temple of Astarte with six columns, arch over center, Astarte in center placing uncertain object on trophy left, Nike on right, altar before temple flanked by palm and murex; interesting type; very rare; SOLD


Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D., Byblos, Phoenicia

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Astarte, a Phoenician fertility and war goddess, was the principal deity of the port city of Sidon. Other major centers of Astarte's worship were Tyre and Byblos, and she was worshiped as far west as Carthage, Sicily, Sardinia and Cyprus. The Greeks associated her with Aphrodite. Byblos produced papyrus and our word bible was derived from the name of this city.
SH52104. Bronze AE 23, BMC Phoenicia 40 - 43, Rouvier 699, VF, weight 11.066 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 195o, Byblos (Jbail, Lebanon) mint, as caesar, 11 Apr 217 - mid May 218 A.D.; obverse MOΠ ∆IA∆YMENIANOC KAI, bare-headed, cuirassed bust right; reverse BYBΛOYIEPAC, temple of two columns surmounted by arch of shell pattern; inside Astarte stands right, turreted, foot on prow, long scepter in right, before her Nike offering wreath standing on column; scarce; SOLD


Melita (Mdina, Malta), Under Roman Rule, c. 150 - 146 B.C.

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Melite or Melita was an ancient city located on the site of present-day Mdina, Malta. It began as a Bronze Age settlement, which grew into the city Maleth under the Phoenicians, and became the administrative center of the island. The city fell to Rome in 218 B.C., and it remained part of the Roman and later the Byzantine Empire until 870 A.D., when it was destroyed by the Aghlabids. The city was then rebuilt and renamed Medina, giving rise to the present name Mdina. It remained Malta's capital city until 1530. Only a few vestiges of the Punic-Roman city have survived. The most substantial are the ruins of the Domvs Romana, in which a number of well-preserved mosaics and statues have been found. Sparse remains of other buildings and parts of the city walls have been excavated, but no visible remains of the city's numerous temples, churches, and other public buildings survive.
GI84545. Bronze AE 26, Calciati III p, 353, 7; Coleiro 3; SNG Cop 463; SNG Dreer 607; SNG Morcom -; SNG Evelpidis I -, aF, green patina, weight 10.719 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 315o, Melita (Mdina, Malta) mint, c. 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse MELITAIWN (downward on right), veiled female (Astarte?) head right, with ureus, wearing lotus crown, sign of Tanit combined with caduceus left; reverse Osiris kneeling left on one knee, with four spread wings, two coming out from the upper back, two from the lower back, wearing solar disc crown, scepter in right hand, flail in left hand, wearing pinafore and necklace; rare; SOLD


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

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Unpublished in major references. This type is common for earlier emperors. BMC and Lindgren list the type for Gallienus only in a larger radiate denomination.
RP09186. Bronze AE 28, cf. BMC Phoenicia p. 291, 474, (radiate AE 31); SNG Cop -; Lindgren -, F, weight 11.88 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Tyre mint, obverse IMP C P LIC [GALLIEN]VS AV, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL TYRO MET, Astarte standing facing, head left, wearing Kalathos, right hand on trophy left, transverse scepter in left hand,Nike standing on column behind, crowning the goddes; small Marsyas stands at feet inner left, murex shell inner right; very rare; SOLD


Dora, Phoenicia, 1st Century A.D.

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Dora, on the coast eight miles north of Caesarea, was a Canaanite city. It fell to the Philistines early in the 12th century B.C. Solomon appointed the son of Abinadab as overseer of Dor (I Kings 4:11). In the Persian period Dor was a Sidonian colony. In Hellenistic times it was a Ptolemaic seaport and royal fortress, once besieged by Antiochus VII, (1 Macc. 15. 11-14). Under the Romans, Dora was a free city. See also Josh 11:2, 17:11; and Judg 1:27.
RP52335. Bronze AE 21, Rosenberger 19, aVF, weight 10.015 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Dora mint, 68 - 69 A.D.; obverse bearded head of Doros right; reverse ∆WPEITWN, Astarte, wearing turreted crown, holding standard and cornucopia, AΛP in left field; rare city; SOLD


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Botrys, Phoenicia

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This reverse type with the same date was used by both Elagabalus and Severus Alexander (and perhaps some of the same reverse dies).

Botrys, modern Batroun, is on the coast road between Tripolis and Byblos.
RP42613. Bronze AE 24, BMC Phoenicia p. 93, 2 (same rev die); Lindgren II 2276 (Elagabalus); Rouvier IV 623; SNG Cop 131 (Elagabalus, laureate, undraped), F, weight 8.837 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Botrys mint, 221 - 222 A.D.; obverse AVTO K M A-[...], laureate and draped bust right; reverse BOTPYHNΩN, hexastyle temple, center arch, peaked roof with wings, statue of Astarte seated facing in central arch, long scepter? in right, apples? in left, [BN-C] (year 252 era of Actium) flanking steps; rare city and coin; SOLD




  




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Astarte