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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros| ▸ |Asklepios||View Options:  |  |  |   

Asklepios (Asclepius)

Asclepius (Asklepios) is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, AglŠa, and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing, respectively.

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Kyme, Aiolis

|Aeolis|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Kyme,| |Aiolis||AE| |38|
Hygieia was the Greek goddess of health. She was the daughter of Asklepios, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asklepios learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP85686. Bronze AE 38, SNGvA 1652; Kraft p. 111, 9a; McClean 7927; Rhousopoulous 3547; SNG Cop -; BMC Troas -, Choice VF, full circles strike on a broad flan, excellent portrait, porosity and some minor pitting, weight 21.937 g, maximum diameter 37.5 mm, die axis 180o, Kyme (near Nemrut Limani, Turkey) mint, c. 212 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse EΠI CTPA ΦΛA ΠAVCEPΩTOC (prefect, strategos Phla(...) Pauserotos), Hygieia on the left, standing facing, feeding snake held in her arms, head right looking at Asklepios, Asklepios on the right, standing slightly right, head turned back left, wearing himation, leaning on snake entwined staff in his right hand, KYMAIΩN in exergue; ex Divus Numismatik; very rare; SOLD


Aurelian, August 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

|Aurelian|, |Aurelian,| |August| |270| |-| |October| |or| |November| |275| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The only other know specimen of this type, MER-RIC T2578 was offered by CGB in its mail bid sale XVI (31 Dec 2002), lot 657. Described as UNIQUE and VF, it went unsold with an estimate of 500 Euros. Our specimen is MUCH nicer.
RA92318. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC T2578 (1 spec., CGB XVI, 31 Dec 2002, lot 657), BnF XII -, G÷bl MIR -, Hunter IV -, RIC V-2 -, Cohen VI -, SRCV III -, et al. -, aEF, much silvering with some luster, well centered on a tight flan, nice portrait, flow lines, some light marks, reverse weak, weight 2.542 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, c. 271 A.D.; obverse IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONSERVATORI, Aesculapius standing slightly right, head left, leaning on snake entwined staff, S in exergue; only the second known specimen of this type!; extremely rare; SOLD


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Ephesos and Pergamon

|Roman| |Asia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Ephesos| |and| |Pergamon||medallion| |AE| |40|
Medallion celebrating the alliance between Ephesus and Pergamum.
SH16611. Bronze medallion AE 40, Franke-Nolle 1545; SNG BnF -; cf. BMC Mysia p. 164, 354 var. (no omphalos or Nike on rev); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Triton VIII, lot 759, aVF, weight 31.986 g, maximum diameter 40.4 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos or Pergamum mint, magistrate P. Aelius Pius; obverse AV KAI M AVPH KOMMO∆OC, laureate and draped bust right, from behind, oval countermark (Severan head?); reverse [...] KOINON OMONO, Asklepios standing facing, holding snake staff, head left, facing statue of Diana of Ephesus standing facing, stags at sides, ΠEPΓAMHNΩN KAI EΦECIΩN in exergue; contrasting dark chocolate fields and toned bronze features, several scratches; very rare; SOLD


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Asklepios was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis. Apollo killed Coronis for being unfaithful but rescued the unborn Asklepios from her womb. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the art of medicine. In return for some kindness, a snake taught him secret knowledge of healing. Asclepius became so proficient as a healer that he surpassed both Chiron and his father, Apollo. Asclepius was even able to evade death and to bring the dead back to life. Zeus killed him to restore balance to the human population but later resurrected Asclepios as a god to prevent a feud with Apollo. Zeus instructed Asclepios to never revive the dead without his approval.
SH33951. Silver denarius, RIC IV 2, RSC III 9, BMCRE V 88, SRCV II 6140, EF, weight 3.426 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 193 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head right; reverse COS II, Asclepius standing left, snake-entwined staff in right hand; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Caracalla|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.||denarius|
RIC only lists the variants where Aesculapius is looking left, however market evidence shows a good number of dies have the god facing as on our coin.
RS12109. Silver denarius, RIC IV 253 var., Choice MS, weight 3.305 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 215 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 18 years, consul for the 4th time, father of the country), Asclepius standing facing, snake-entwined staff in right hand, Telesphorus at feet on left, globe at feet on right; lustrous, full circle centering; SOLD


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Asklepios was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis. Apollo killed Coronis for being unfaithful but rescued the unborn Asklepios from her womb. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the art of medicine. In return for some kindness, a snake taught him secret knowledge of healing. Asclepius became so proficient as a healer that he surpassed both Chiron and his father, Apollo. Asclepius was even able to evade death and to bring the dead back to life. Zeus killed him to restore balance to the human population but later resurrected Asclepios as a god to prevent a feud with Apollo. Zeus instructed Asclepios to never revive the dead without his approval.
SH33339. Silver denarius, RIC IV 2, RSC III 9, BMCRE V 88, Hunter III 3, SRCV II 6140, gVF, strong portrait, reverse a little weak, weight 3.109 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 193 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head right; reverse COS II, Asclepius standing left, snake-entwined staff in right; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Hadrianopolis,| |Thrace||AE| |28|
Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Hygieia, the goddess of health, was his daughter with Minerva. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in Asclepius' temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP41398. Bronze AE 28, BMC Thrace p. 116, 3, aVF, weight 13.457 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 225o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYTKAITAIA∆PI ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse HΓAΠOYOΠEICKOYA∆PIANOΠOΛEIT, Asklepios standing facing, looking left, staff which serpent twines in left, Hygieia standing right, patera in right hand, feeding serpent; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Pautalia, Thrace

|Roman| |Thrace| |&| |Black| |Sea|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Pautalia,| |Thrace||AE| |32|
Pautalia was located near thermal springs and remains of the ancient city include a temple of Asklepios. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. In the 1990s, excavation of nearby 2nd century A.D. tumuli unearthed bronze surgical instruments and a small bronze case containing a variety of medicines.
SH63235. Bronze AE 32, Varbanov II 4972 (he notes, otherwise unpublished), F, some earthen encrustation, weight 19.76 g, maximum diameter 31.9 mm, die axis 45o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, magistrate Caecina Largus, 198 - 201 A.D.; obverse AYT M AYPHΛIOC - ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, young bust right, from behind; reverse HΓE KAIKINA ΓΛAPOY OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, tetrastyle temple of Asklepios, front and right side seen in perspective, statue of Asklepios holding snake entwined staff in center, three steps; sculptures of a bull on left and male figure on right each on high base, trees flanking behind; very rare; SOLD


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 215 - 150 B.C.

|Italy|, |Rhegion,| |Bruttium,| |Italy,| |c.| |215| |-| |150| |B.C.||pentonkion|
GB31124. Bronze pentonkion, HN Italy 2551; BMC Italy p. 382, 94, aVF, weight 10.007 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 270o, Rhegion mint, c. 215 - 150 B.C.; obverse janiform female head, wearing polos; reverse Asklepios seated left, holding scepter, Π left; nice style; SOLD


Trikka, Thessaly, Greece, c. 400 - 344 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Trikka,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |c.| |400| |-| |344| |B.C.||trichalkon|
Trikka, modern Tikala, is located in the fertile plain of Thessaly in central Greece. Trikka was the birthplace of three of the Argonauts and also claimed to be the birthplace of Asklepios. Epidaurus also claimed to be the birthplace of Asklepios and that city was the site of his main temple in antiquity.
GB86191. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly II 788; SNG Cop 266; BMC Thessaly p. 52, 17; Liampi Trikka 7; Rogers 556; Moustaka 181, gVF, attractive style,, weight 7.245 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Thessaly, Trikka (Tikala, Greece) mint, c. 400 - 344 B.C.; obverse head of the Nymph Trikka right, wearing triple-drop pendant earring; reverse Asklepios seated right on a stool, bearded, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, transverse staff on far side leaning on left arm, feeding bird held in his right hand to snake coiled and rising up before him; rare; SOLD




  




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