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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros| ▸ |Asklepios||View Options:  |  |  | 

Asklepios (Asclepius)

Asclepius (Asklepios) is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Agla, and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing, respectively.

Hadrianothera, Mysia, c. 130 - 161 A.D.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Hadrianothera,| |Mysia,| |c.| |130| |-| |161| |A.D.||AE| |18|NEW
Hadrianothera was founded by Hadrian to commemorate his successful hunting expedition in the area.
RP110553. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online III 1635/11; SNG BnF 1084 var. (diff. monogram); BMC Mysia, p. 75, 1 var. (no monogram); SNGvA 1146 var. (same); SNG Cop -, VF, attractive brass high points with darker contrasting fields, tight flan, tiny edge cracks, weight 4.395 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianothera (near Dursunbey, Turkey) mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 130 - 161 A.D.; obverse IEPA CYNKΛHTOCC, draped youthful bust of the senate right; reverse A∆PIANOΘHPITΩN, Asklepios standing facing, head left, himation around waist and legs and over left shoulder, leaning on snake entwined staff in right hand, monogram lower right; rare; $170.00 SALE PRICE $153.00 ON RESERVE


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Cotiaeum, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia||tetrassarion|
Asklepios is the Greek god of medicine. Hygieia is the goddess of health and Asklepios' daughter. Telesphoros is Asklepios' assistant. Asklepios learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP110209. Bronze tetrassarion, SNG Hunt 2048; SNG Mu 333 var. (rev. leg.); SNG Cop 337 var. (same) BMC Phrygia p. 177, 94 var. (bust); SNGvA 3791 var. (Telesphoros in center), VF, dark near black patina, light deposits, near centered, die wear, small rev. die crack/breaks, weight 7.089 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 195o, Cotiaeum (Kutahya, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AVT K Π ΛIK OVAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠ Π AIΛ ∆HMHETPIANOY IΠ (P. Ailios Demetrios hipparchos, HM ligate), Hygieia, on left, standing right, feeding serpent in right hand from patera in left hand; Asklepios, on right, standing facing, head left, leaning with right hand on serpent-entwined staff; AP/X (archon) in two lines above center, KOTIAEΩN (ΩN ligate) in exergue; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Asklepios was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis. Apollo killed Coronis for being unfaithful but rescued the unborn Asklepios from her womb. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the art of medicine. In return for some kindness, a snake taught him secret knowledge of healing. Asclepius became so proficient as a healer that he surpassed both Chiron and his father, Apollo. Asclepius was even able to evade death and to bring the dead back to life. Zeus killed him to restore balance to the human population but later resurrected Asclepios as a god to prevent a feud with Apollo. Zeus instructed Asclepios to never revive the dead without his approval.
SH33951. Silver denarius, RIC IV 2, RSC III 9, BMCRE V 88, SRCV II 6140, EF, weight 3.426 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 193 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head right; reverse COS II, Asclepius standing left, snake-entwined staff in right hand; SOLD


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Asklepios was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis. Apollo killed Coronis for being unfaithful but rescued the unborn Asklepios from her womb. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the art of medicine. In return for some kindness, a snake taught him secret knowledge of healing. Asclepius became so proficient as a healer that he surpassed both Chiron and his father, Apollo. Asclepius was even able to evade death and to bring the dead back to life. Zeus killed him to restore balance to the human population but later resurrected Asclepios as a god to prevent a feud with Apollo. Zeus instructed Asclepios to never revive the dead without his approval.
SH33339. Silver denarius, RIC IV 2, RSC III 9, BMCRE V 88, Hunter III 3, SRCV II 6140, gVF, strong portrait, reverse a little weak, weight 3.109 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 193 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head right; reverse COS II, Asclepius standing left, snake-entwined staff in right; SOLD


Kos, Carian Islands, c. 88 - 50 B.C.

|Kos|, |Kos,| |Carian| |Islands,| |c.| |88| |-| |50| |B.C.||AE| |15|
In the Hellenistic age, Kos attained the zenith of its prosperity. Its alliance was valued by the kings of Egypt, who used it as a naval outpost to oversee the Aegean. As a seat of learning, it arose as a provincial branch of the museum of Alexandria, and became a favorite resort for the education of the princes of the Ptolemaic dynasty; there was also a medical school. Among its most famous sons were the physician Hippocrates, the painter Apelles, the poets Philitas and, perhaps, Theocritus.
GB84656. Bronze AE 15, apparently unpublished, cf. SNGvA supp. 8176 (head l., A vice B), BMC Caria -, SNG Keckman -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tb -, SNG Mugla -, Lindgren -, HGC 6 -, VF, green patina, earthen highlighting, a little porous, weight 3.375 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kos mint, c. 88 - 50 B.C.; obverse head of Asklepios right; reverse snake coiled around staff, B left; extremely rare; SOLD







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