Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 2 MARCH Layaway and reserve are not available during the sale Shop NOW and save! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 2 MARCH Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958 Shop NOW and save!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros| ▸ |Asklepios||View Options:  |  |  | 

Asklepios

Asclepius is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Aglśa, and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing, respectively.


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Cotiaeum, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia|, |tetrassarion|
Asklepios is the Greek god of medicine. Hygieia is the goddess of health and Askelpois' daughter. Telesphoros is Asklepios' assistant. Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP91190. Bronze tetrassarion, SNG MŁnchen 333; SNGvA 3791; SNG Hunterian 2048; BMC Phrygia p. 177, 95 var. (exergue in two lines...Ω/N); SNG Cop -; SNG Righetti -, Choice VF, well centered, dark patina, highest points flatly struck, small edge split, central depressions, weight 6.308 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Cotiaeum (Kutahya, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AYT K Π ΛIK OYAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠI Π AI ∆HMHTPIANOY IΠΠ (P. Ailios Demetrios, archon and hipparchos), Hygieia, on left, standing right, feeding serpent in right hand from patera in left hand; Asklepios, on right, standing facing, head left, leaning with right hand on serpent-entwined staff; Telesphoros between them, standing facing, ΛP/X in two lines above center, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
The Greeks and Romans did not view snakes as evil creatures but rather as symbols and tools for healing and fertility. Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RA89970. Billon antoninianus, GŲbl MIR 1649g, RIC V-1 S632, RSC IV 140, Hunter IV S208, SRCV III 10193, gVF, much silvering, nice portrait, full legends, broad round flan, weight 3.819 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 260 - 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONSERVATOR AVG, Aesculapius standing facing, head left, leaning on snake entwined staff; $45.00 SALE |PRICE| $40.50


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 133 - 16 B.C.

|Pergamene| |Kingdom|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |133| |-| |16| |B.C.|, |AE| |18|
Asclepius, one of Apollo's sons, was the Greek god of medicine, sharing with Apollo the epithet Paean (the Healer). Pilgrims flocked to the Asclepieia, his healing temples, where the physicians and attendants were known as the Therapeutae. Ritual purification would be followed by offerings or sacrifices to the god, and the supplicant would then spend the night in the holiest part of the sanctuary, the abaton, where the non-venemous snakes slithered around freely on the floor. Any dreams or visions would be reported to a priest who would interpret the dreams and prescribe the appropriate therapy. The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today.
GB94443. Bronze AE 18, BMC Mysia p. 128, 155; SNG BnF 1828 ff., SNG Cop 370 ff.; SNGvA 1373; Waddington 7097, SGCV II 3968, aF, green patina, porous, weight 3.235 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 133 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Asklepios right; reverse AΣKΛHΠIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ (to Asklepios the Savior), snake-entwined Asklepian staff; $30.00 SALE |PRICE| $27.00







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Tuesday, February 25, 2020.
Page created in 0.391 seconds.
Asklepios