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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Birds| ▸ |Eagle||View Options:  |  |  |   

Eagles on Ancient Coins
Tyre, Phoenicia, 78 - 77 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

|30| |Pieces| |of| |Silver|, |Tyre,| |Phoenicia,| |78| |-| |77| |B.C.,| |Judas'| |30| |Pieces| |of| |Silver|, |shekel|
Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SL95986. Silver shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 243, 141; Cohen DCA 919/49; HGC 10 357; SNG Cop -, NGC Ch AU, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (5770405-008), weight 14.330 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 78 - 77 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΘM (year 49) over club left, ∆ right, Aramaic letter bet between legs; from the Errett Bishop Collection; NGC| Lookup; $3000.00 SALE |PRICE| $2700.00
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy I, as Satrap, 323 - 305 B.C., Portrait of Alexander

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |I,| |as| |Satrap,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander|, |tetradrachm|NEW
This type has traditionally been dated to Ptolemy's rule as satrap but Lorber notes the helmet and some associated symbols are shared with a bronze type that names Ptolemy as King. It appears the helmet series was struck c. 306 - c. 300 B.C., both before and after Ptolemy's coronation in late 305 or early 304. The helmet series tetradrachms were struck at a reduced standard of c. 15.71g and all of the referenced specimens were struck at the reduced standard. This coin, however, was struck on an earlier, heavier Attic standard flan. It seems unlikely that it was simply struck using an older flan in error. The slightly different style and monogram (curved crossbar) suggest it may be from the earliest issues of the series, struck before the standard changed.
GS96467. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Lorber CPE 69; Svoronos 162; SNG Cop 29; Noeske 6; Hosking 4; BMC Ptolemies p. 4, 33 (all struck at the reduced 15.71g standard), VF, well centered, flow lines, marks, mild die wear, heavy flan, weight 16.515 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria(?) mint, as Satrap, 306 - 305 B.C.; obverse Alexander the Great, head right, wearing elephant skin headdress and aegis; reverse Athena Alkidemos advancing right, holding shield and brandishing javelin, AΛEΞAN∆POY upward on left; Corinthian helmet right over XA monogram over eagle standing right on thunderbolt with wings closed in right field; ex Münz Zentrum Rheinland auction 190 (11 Mar 2020), lot 399 ; $1500.00 SALE |PRICE| $1350.00
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.|, |sestertius|
Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RB95780. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II-3 260 (S), BMCRE III 1203, Hunter II 358, SRCV II 3625, Cohen II 1207 var. (no drapery), Choice aEF, dark patina, light deposits, spots of corrosion, weight 27.215 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 119 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG P M TR P COS III, laureate bust right, bare chest, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse PROVIDENTIA DEORVM (to the foresight of the gods), Hadrian standing facing, togate, lituus (or scroll?) in left hand, head left looking at eagle flying right with scepter held in talons, extending right hand to receive scepter from eagle, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; scarce; $1100.00 SALE |PRICE| $990.00
 


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 46 - 47 A.D.

|The| |Temple| |Tax| |Coin|, |The| |Temple| |Tax| |Coin,| |Tyre| |KP| |Type| |Half| |Shekel,| |Jerusalem| |or| |Tyre| |Mint,| |46| |-| |47| |A.D.|, |half| |shekel|
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

JD95985. Silver half shekel, DCA Tyre II 911, Cohen DCA 922 (R2), RPC Online I 4702B, HGC 10 358 (unlisted date), Prieur -, BMC Phoenicia -, SNG Cop -, AUB -, F, toned, scratches, bumps, flan crack, obverse off center, weight 6.701 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 46 - 47 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, POB (year 172) over club left, KP over monogram (control) right, Aramaic alef (control) between legs; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $950.00 SALE |PRICE| $855.00
 


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 36 - 37 A.D.

|The| |Temple| |Tax| |Coin|, |The| |Temple| |Tax| |Coin,| |Tyre| |KP| |Type| |Half| |Shekel,| |Jerusalem| |or| |Tyre| |Mint,| |36| |-| |37| |A.D.|, |half| |shekel|
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

SH94461. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4695, Prieur 1465, BMC Phoenicia -, aVF, attractive style, toned, bumps and marks, die wear, closed edge crack, weight 6.244 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 36 - 37 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞB (year 162) over club left, KP over monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; ex Forum (2010), ex Temple Tax Hoard; $775.00 SALE |PRICE| $695.00
 


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

|Paphlagonia|, |Sinope,| |Paphlagonia,| |c.| |330| |-| |300| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Long used as a Hittite port, Sinope was re-founded as a Greek colony by Miletus in the 7th century B.C. Sinope flourished as the Black Sea port of a caravan route that led from the upper Euphrates valley. The city escaped Persian domination until the early 4th century B.C. In 183 B.C. it was captured by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the kingdom of Pontus. Lucullus conquered Sinope for Rome in 70 B.C., and Julius Caesar established a Roman colony there, Colonia Julia Felix, in 47 B.C. It remained with the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantines). It was a part of the Empire of Trebizond from the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 until the capture of the city by the Seljuk Turks of Rūm in 1214.
SH91741. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1481; SNG Stancomb 770; SNG Pontus p. 97, 13 ff. var. (magistrate); SNG Cop 284 f. var. (same); HGC 7 399 (S), VF, centered on a tight flan, porous, dark areas, weight 4.748 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of nymph left, hair in sakkos, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace; reverse eagle left with dolphin left in talons, AΓPEΩΣ (magistrate) below wing, ΣINΩ below dolphin; scarce; $420.00 SALE |PRICE| $378.00 ON RESERVE


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |IV| |Philopator,| |221| |-| |204| |B.C.|, |AE| |29|NEW
Ptolemy IV's surname Philopator means father lover, ironic since according to some authorities he poisoned his father. Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria. He was a cruel and evil monarch.
GP96452. Bronze AE 29, Svoronos 994/1151; SNG Cop 215; BMC Ptolemies p. 75, 73 (Ptolemy V, 193 - 181 B.C.); Weiser 98 (Ptolemy V, 204 - 202 B.C.); Hosking -; Noeske -, aEF, very attracitve toned bare metal surfaces, well centered, double struck obverse, beveled obverse edge, central depressions, weight 23.930 g, maximum diameter 31.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 204 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted double cornucopia on right shoulder, Σ or ΣE monogram between legs; scarce; $360.00 SALE |PRICE| $324.00
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy X Alexander, as King of Cyprus, 113 - 105 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom,| |Ptolemy| |X| |Alexander,| |as| |King| |of| |Cyprus,| |113| |-| |105| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|NEW
Mųrkholm in "The last Ptolemaic silver coinage in Cyprus" in Chiron 13 (1983), dated the last coinage of Ptolemy X from Paphos to his year 9 (106 - 105 B.C.). Svoronos 1757 was not addressed, presumably because the only specimen then known was not illustrated and was found in Alexandria. Matt Kreuzer attributes this coin as Svoronos 1757, struck for Ptolemy X as King of Cyprus at Paphos. If he is correct, this confirms that Paphos, like Salamis (see Svoronos 1784) and Kition (Mųrkholm Cyprus pl. 2.11,12), was under the control of Ptolemy X at least early in his Year 10 (105 - 104 B.C.). Kreuzer notes specifically that this is not Svoronos 1671, Year 10 of Ptolemy IX (108 - 107 B.C.) at Alexandria, which has a different style including a perky nose.
GP96458. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1757 (only 1 specimen known to Svoronos, and not in the plates), VF, areas of coppery corrosion and pitting, weight 12.840 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos mint, c. late summer - autumn 105 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy X right, wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, LI (regnal year 10) left, ΠA right; extremely rare; $325.00 SALE |PRICE| $292.00
 


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 250 - 175 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |c.| |250| |-| |175| |B.C.,| |Civic| |Issue| |in| |the| |Types| |and| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great|, |tetradrachm|
Mesembria, Nesebar Bulgaria today, was a Doric settlement on a Black Sea island just off mainland Thrace. Thrace was invaded by the Galatians in 279 B.C. Only the wealthy coastal cities, including Mesembria, withstood their attacks. Following that chaos, rule of Thrace was divided between many tribes. Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C., tried to regain control of the area for the Macedonian Kingdom, but his success was limited and short lived. Mesembria was taken by Mithradates VI in the First Mithradatic War and surrendered to Rome in 71 B.C. The city struck Alexandrine tetradrachms as early as 275 B.C., more than 50 years after Alexander's death, and probably issued the very last Alexandrine tetradrachms struck anywhere, possibly under Roman rule as late as 65 B.C.
SH91294. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 83 & pl. VI, 21 - 22 (O7/R10, same die break on exergue line); Price 992; Müller Alexander 436, Mektepini 9, HGC 3.2 1567 (R1), VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, light toning, weight 17.003 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 30o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 250 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on left, Zeus Aėtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over (ΠA monogram) in inner left field under arm; $310.00 SALE |PRICE| $279.00 ON RESERVE


Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrius I Poliorketes, 306 - 286 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |I| |Poliorketes,| |306| |-| |286| |B.C.|, |tetradrachm|
Demetrius I Poliorketes (The Besieger), son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, was given the title king by his father in 306 B.C. after he defeated Ptolemy I at the Battle of Salamis. In 294 he seized the throne of Macedonia by murdering Alexander V. The combined forces of Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, forced him out of Macedonia in 288. Abandoned by his troops on the field of battle he surrendered to Seleucus in 286 and died in captivity in 283 B.C.
SL87623. Silver tetradrachm, Newell 30, pl. III, 13 (XXXIV/69); Newell Tyrus 32, pl. III, 7 (same dies); Hersh Tyrus 43a; HGC 3 1011; SNG Alpha Bank -, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (2490378-002), weight 16.877 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 180o, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, c. 306 - 295 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aėtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, club left in a circle on left, AP monogram under throne, ∆HMITPIOY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) below; NGC| Lookup; rare; $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00
 




  



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