Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Pegasos||View Options:  |  |  | 

Pegasus on Ancient Coins

Pegasos, the celebrated winged horse, and symbol of Corinth, was sired by Poseidon in his role as horse-god, and sprung from the blood of Medusa. Flying to Helicon he struck the earth with his hoof creating the fountain of Hippocrene, sacred to the nine muses. Pegasos was thus a symbol of Apollo, the God of Poetry and Song, who presided over the muses. Bellerophon rode Pegasos in his combat with the Chimaera.

Cilicia, Persian Rule, 4th Century B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Cilicia,| |Persian| |Rule,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |obol|
Cilicia extended along the Mediterranean coast east from Pamphylia, to the Amanus Mountains, which separated it from Syria.
SH95333. Silver obol, SNG BnF 482, SNG Levante 232, Gktrk -, Troxell-Kagan -, gVF, dark tone, tight oval flan, some porosity, tiny edge split, weight 0.702 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse crowned and bearded head (of Persian Great King?) right; reverse forepart of Pegasos right; very rare; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


Lampsakos, Mysia, 394 - 330 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |394| |-| |330| |B.C.|, |trihemiobol|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB88954. Silver trihemiobol, SNG Cop 196, Baldwin Lampsakos 36 ff. var., SNG Delepierre 2525 var., BMC Mysia 49 var., Dewing 2199 var., SNGvA 1296 var. (control varieties), aVF, dark toning, bumps and marks, high points flat, weight 1.123 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 394 - 330 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of Pegasos flying right, curved archaic style wing, Λ-A-M around above, star (control symbol) below; ex Dmitry Markov Coins & Medals; $165.00 SALE |PRICE| $149.00


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and the Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Timoleon| |and| |the| |Third| |Democracy,| |c.| |344| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |hemilitron|
Timoleon installed a democracy in 345 B.C. After the long series of internal struggles had weakened Syracuse's power, Timoleon tried to remedy this, defeating the Carthaginians near the Krimisos river in 339 B.C. Unfortunately the struggle among the city's parties restarted after his death and ended with the rise of another tyrant, Agathocles, who seized power in 317 B.C.
GI91325. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 211, 92 DS 25 (same obv. die); BMC Sicily p. 188, 304 var. (no helmet); SNG ANS 1384 var. (same); HGC 2 1505 (S); SNG Cop -; SNG Mn -, gVF, well centered, rough corrosion/encrustation, weight 2.588 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, Syracuse mint, c. 336 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of head of nymph Arethusa facing slightly left, Thessalian helmet (control symbol) left; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, Pegasos forepart flying left, archaic curved wing; Ex Eric J. Engstrom Collection; scarce; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00


Indigets, Untikesken, Emporion, Iberia, c. 130 - 90 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Indigets,| |Untikesken,| |Emporion,| |Iberia,| |c.| |130| |-| |90| |B.C.|, |as|
Early in the 2nd century B.C., Emporion began striking bronze coinage with the Iberian inscription UTIKENSKEN, which refers to the Indigets tribe that inhabited the town and its surrounding area. The earliest coins were struck at a one ounce standard of 1/12 Roman pound. In the mid 2nd Century B.C., the standard changed to 1/15th of the Roman pound. Some of these coins were marked XV, most were marked with an Iberian EI mark, which means 15. The names of magistrates were added to some coins in the second half of the 2nd century B.C. Weights were gradually reduced until coinage with Iberian inscriptions ended in the 1st century B.C.
GB88304. Bronze as, reduced Roman ounce standard, Villaronga-Benages 1043 (same dies), Villaronga CNH 50, cf. SNG BM Spain 522, F, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, soft strike, weak reverse, weight 14.462 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Emporion (Empries, Catalonia, Spain) mint, c. 130 - 90 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena-Minerva right, Iberian mark before: EI (15); reverse Pegasos springing right, head modified, laurel wreath above rump, palm frond outer right, Iberian inscription above exergue line: UTIKESKEN; ex Jenceck Historical Enterprise; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Adramytion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Adramytion,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |10|
According to the Acts of the Apostles, whilst en route to Rome, St. Paul departed Caesarea Maritima on a ship from the city of Adramyttium which took him to Myra in Lycia.
GB87701. Bronze AE 10, SNG BnF 1, SNGvA 7192; Klein 247, Waddington 607, Trait II 2, 2515, BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, earthen deposits, weight 0.947 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 90o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse A∆PA, forepart of Pegasos right, with archaic style curved wings, grain ear right below; scarce; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Kelenderis, Cilicia, 410 - 375 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Kelenderis,| |Cilicia,| |410| |-| |375| |B.C.|, |obol|
The land around Kelenderis was inadequate for farming but, apparently from the coins, suitable for raising goats. On the plateau behind the hills there were vineyards and olive trees, rich sources of minerals, especially iron and woods, mainly pine and cedar, which were essential for ship building. The town was connected to the Central Anatolian Plateau with suitable passages in the valleys, but it was mainly a port, connected with Cyprus and other countries lying on the Mediterranean coasts.
GS95357. Silver obol, SNG BnF 83, SNG Delepierre 2838, Gktrk 7, SNG Levante 27, SNG Cop 89, SNGvA 5635, F, obverse double struck with a very worn die, toned, weight 0.663 g, maximum diameter 10.8 mm, die axis 180o, Kelenderis (Aydincik, Turkey) mint, 410 - 375 B.C.; obverse forepart of Pegasus left, head turned back right, curved wings, dot border; reverse goat kneeling right, head turned back left, KEΛ above; $45.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Lampsakos, Mysia, 190 - 85 B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |190| |-| |85| |B.C.|, |AE| |13|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB93077. Bronze AE 13, SNG BnF 1243 corr. (fulmen described as a torch); SNG Cop 222; BMC Mysia p. 87, 74; SNGvA -, F, green patina, buff earthen deposits, tight flan, weight 2.530 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 190 - 85 B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, veiled and wreathed with grain; reverse fulmen (thunderbolt), ΛAM above, forepart of Pegasos right below; scarce; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.|, |antoninianus|
In 268, Gallienus was murdered by his senior officers while besieging the would-be usurper Aureolus in Mediolanum (Milan). The Senate charged Marcus Aurelius Claudius with Gallienus' murder but it was never proven. The accused became the new emperor, Claudius II.
RA92985. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 712b, RIC V-1 S283, RSC IV 979, SRCV III 10362, Hunter IV 127 (1st officina), F, encrusted, edge cracks, weight 2.080 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, 1st or 9th officina, Rome mint, 10th emission, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse SOLI CONS AVG, Pegasus right, A or reversed N in exergue; $28.00 SALE |PRICE| $25.20


Skepsis, Troas, c. 350 - 306 B.C.

|Troas|, |Skepsis,| |Troas,| |c.| |350| |-| |306| |B.C.|, |AE| |8|
Skepsis or Scepsis, an ancient settlement in the Troad, is today the village of Kursunlutepe, near the town of Bayramic in Turkey. The famous library of Aristotle was kept at Skepsis before being moved to Pergamum and then Alexandria. It was also home to Metrodorus of Scepsis and Demetrius of Scepsis. Several times in its history, the citizens of Skepsis were forced to move elsewhere. In 306 B.C., Antigonus evacuated Skepsis and other cities in the area and forced the residents to move to Alexandria Troas. Tradition holds that Saint Cornelius the Centurion, the first gentile convert to Christianity, became the first bishop of Skepsis in the early days of Christianity.Skepsis

MA95194. Bronze AE 8, BMC Troas p. 81, 7; SNG Cop 483; SNG Tb 2670, F, dark patina, well centered, earthen deposits, weight 0.825 g, maximum diameter 8.4 mm, die axis 0o, Skepsis (Kursunlutepe, Turkey) mint, c. 350 - 306 B.C.; obverse Pegasos forepart right; reverse fir-tree within linear square; $21.00 (19.32) ON RESERVE







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Monday, May 25, 2020.
Page created in 0.599 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity