Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 2 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities 10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 2 October!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Pegasos||View Options:  |  |  |   

Pegasus on Ancient Coins

Pegasos, the celebrated winged horse, and symbol of Corinth, was sired by Poseidon in his role as horse-god, and sprung from the blood of Medusa. Flying to Helicon he struck the earth with his hoof creating the fountain of Hippocrene, sacred to the nine muses. Pegasos was thus a symbol of Apollo, the God of Poetry and Song, who presided over the muses. Bellerophon rode Pegasos in his combat with the Chimaera.

Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||AE| |15|
The aegis was a well-known symbol of Alexander the Great. After his death, the body of Alexander and his aegis wound up in the hands of the Ptolemies. At the time this coin was struck, Alexander Balas was the son in law of Ptolemy VI and the Ptolemaic candidate for the Seleucid throne. After the break between them, Ptolemy VI dissolved his daughter's first marriage and married her to Demetrius II, as if she were a piece of furniture. (J.P. Mahaffy). Alexander Balas fell at the 145 BC Battle of Oenoparas. Though the Battle was a Ptolemaic victory, Ptolemy VI died of battle wounds a few days later. Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered. Apamea, on the right bank of the Orontes River, was an ancient Greek and Roman city. It was located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce and became one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Seleucus also made it a military base with 500 elephants, and an equestrian stud with 30,000 mares and 300 stallions.
GY112042. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber II 1792(2)b, Babelon 869, Houghton CSE 207 var. (A vice monogram), cf. SNG Spaer 1481 (control obscure), VF, porosity, obv. off center, edge cracks/splits, obv. edge beveled, weight 1.903 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 150 - 146 B.C.; obverse aegis with gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa) at center; reverse Pegasos flying right right, AYB monogram (control) below, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) above, AΛEΞANΔPOY (Alexander) below; rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Lampsakos, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Lampsakos|, |Lampsakos,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |10|
Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB99210. Bronze AE 10, SNG Cop 206, SNG BnF 1223, SNGvA 1300, Waddington 887, aVF, glossy green patina, corrosion, pitting, weight 1.725 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 270o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse ΛAM, female (nymph IO?) head right, hair in sakkos; reverse ΨA, forepart of Pegasos right; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |c.| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.||stater|
Athena is the Greek goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, strategic warfare, mathematics, strength, strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill. She was believed to lead soldiers into battle as the war goddess Athena Promachos. The Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis was dedicated to her, along with numerous other temples and monuments across Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. Her usual attribute is the owl and Nike is her frequent companion.
SH26890. Silver stater, Pegasi I 427, Ravel 1009, gVF, weight 8.512 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 270o, Corinth mint, c. 375 - 300 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse laureate and helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, aegis behind, A-P below; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.||stater|
In 344 B.C., the aristocracy of Syracuse appealed to their mother city of Corinth against their tyrant Dionysius II. The Corinthian general Timoleon led a liberation force to Sicily. Landing at Tauromenium (Taormina) in the summer, Timoleon faced two armies, one under Dionysius and the other under Hicetas (tyrant of nearby Leontini), who has also called in Carthaginian forces. By shrewd tactics Timoleon defeated his enemies and occupied Syracuse.
SH58242. Silver stater, Pegasi I 460, BCD Korinth 135, gVF, toned, weight 8.131 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 345 - 307 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, Δ below chin, I and herm with kerykeion and cornucopia behind; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 404 - 435 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |c.| |404| |-| |435| |B.C.||stater|
Corinth is mentioned many times in the New Testament, largely in connection with Apostle Paul's mission there. Paul first visited the city in 51 or 52 and resided there for 18 months (Acts 18:1-18). Paul wrote at least two epistles to the Christian community, the First Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Ephesus) and the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Macedonia).
SH68246. Silver stater, Pegasi I 246/2; McClean 6171; BMC Corinth -; BCD Korinth -; SNG Cop -, gVF, light toning, small flan flaw on Pegsos, weight 8.442 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Corinth mint, c. 404 - 435 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying right, pointed wings, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right wearing a plain Corinthian helmet over leather cap, aphlaston behind; scarce; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.||stater|
Horace is quoted as saying: "non licet omnibus adire Corinthum," which translates, "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth" (referring to the expensive living standards that prevailed in the city). Corinth was renowned for the temple prostitutes of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, who served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or traveling in and out of the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favors.
SH46853. Silver stater, Pegasi I 457, BCD Korinth 133, Ravel 1081, HGC 4 1848, BMC Corinth -, VF, weight 8.368 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 315o, Corinth mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, Δ below chin, I and Artemis running right with torch behind; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.||stater|
 
SH46854. Silver stater, Pegasi I 385, BCD Korinth -, SNG Cop -, BMC Corinth -, weight 8.550 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Corinth mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right, facing bearded ithyphallic herm (terminal) and N behind; scarce; SOLD


Anaktorion, Akarnania, Greece, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

|Akarnania|, |Anaktorion,| |Akarnania,| |Greece,| |c.| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.||stater|
Anaktorion (Anactorium) was a Corinthian colony, founded c. 630 B.C. on the south bank of the Ambracian Gulf, near modern Vonitsa. The location was favorable for trade and shipping but less so for farming. The residents engaged in trade, fishing and logging. Like the other cities of Acarnania, Anaktorion declined after the Battle of Actium when Augustus founded Nikopolis on the other side of the Ambracian Gulf and forced the its residents to move there. No archaeological excavations have yet been done at the site and few ruins remain visible above ground.Anaktorion
SH19454. Silver stater, Pegasi II 30, BCD Akarnania 89, BMC Corinth p. 118, 35; SNG Cop 289; SNG Alpha Bank 525; HGC 4 758, aEF, weight 8.378 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Anaktorion (near Nea Kamarina, Greece) mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with pointed wing flying right, ligate AN below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right in Corinthian helmet over leather cap, tripod in wreath and ligate AN behind; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 340 - 320 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |c.| |340| |-| |320| |B.C.||stater|
Horace is quoted as saying: "non licet omnibus adire Corinthum," which translates, "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth" (referring to the expensive living standards in the city). Corinth was renowned for the temple prostitutes of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, who served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or traveling in and out of the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favors.
SH65227. Silver stater, Pegasi I 394/1, Ravel 1007, VF, nice style, weight 8.443 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 45o, Corinth mint, c. 340 - 320 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with a pointed wing flying left, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap, Δ within wreath behind; SOLD


Leukas, Akarnania, Greece, c. 435 - 400 B.C.

|Akarnania|, |Leukas,| |Akarnania,| |Greece,| |c.| |435| |-| |400| |B.C.||stater|
Lefkada (Leukas) is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea off the west coast of Greece between the islands of Corfu and Cephalonia. According to myth, the Kefalines, who lived on Lefkada, participated in the Trojan War, under the command of Ulysses. Laertis, Ulysses' father, occupied the town of Niriko and offered the island to Icarius, father of Penelope, after her wedding to Ulysses. The town of Leukas was founded by the Corinthians in the 7th century B.C. and issued coins with Corinthian types.

During the period when this coin was struck, Leucas joined the Spartan Confederation opposing Athens in the Peloponnesian War.
SH56866. Silver stater, Pegasi II p. 395, 27; BMC Corinth p. 126, 15; SNG Delepierre 1230 (all same dies); SNG Cop -, aVF, toned, graffiti, weight 8.521 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Leucas (Lefkada, Greece) mint, c. 435 - 400 B.C.; obverse Pegasus flying left, unbridled, curled archaic wings, Λ below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap; Λ above, phiale behind; scarce; SOLD




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Monday, September 25, 2023.
Page created in 1.47 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity