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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Dog||View Options:  |  |  | 

Dogs on Ancient Coins
Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 550 - 450 B.C.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |c.| |550| |-| |450| |B.C.||stater|
Seirios (Sirius) was the god or goddess of the Dog-Star, the brightest star of the constellation Canis Major. The pre-dawn rising of the star in the path of the sun was believed to be the source of the scorching heat and droughts of midsummer. Seirios appears in many guises was variously described as Maira daughter of the Titan Atlas, Maira the dog of the hero Icarius, Lailaps the hound of Orion, and Kyon Khryseos the golden-hound of Zeus. It may also have been associated with Orthros ("Morning Twilight") the hound of Geryon, giant of the west. The star was no doubt also connected with the dog-loving goddess Hekate who was the daughter of Perses "the Destroyer" and Asteria "the Starry One." -- www.theoi.com/Titan/AsterSeirios.html
SH86217. Electrum stater, Von Fritze I (Nomisma VII) 104 & pl. 3, 23; Boston MFA 1433; SNG BnF 245; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, tight flan, edge cracks, weight 16.091 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos mint, c. 550 - 450 B.C.; obverse winged dog (Sirius?) seated left, head turned back right, curved archaic wing, wearing collar, tunny fish below to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; extremely rare; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.||stater|
SH68250. Gold stater, apparently unpublished; Price -; Müller -; Hersh -, NGC Ch VF, Strike 4/5, Surface 3/5, weight 8.485 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain mint, early posthumous issue(?); obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right hand, stylus in left, monogram to left, hound(?) at feet on left; ex Gorny and Mosch auction 216, lot 2272; certified (slabbed) by Numismatic Guarantee Corporation (NGC); extremely rare, possibly unique; SOLD


Eryx, Sicily, c. 400 - 390 B.C.

|Other| |Sicily|, |Eryx,| |Sicily,| |c.| |400| |-| |390| |B.C.||onkia|
Calciati 13 and SNG 1328 are similar to this coin but with a female head on the obverse and the pellet above the dog on the reverse. Calciati 13A has a male head, but the dog faces left. The only reference that records this specific type is the Handbook of Greek Coins. The photographed HGC coin shares the same reverse die with our coin, but is incorrectly described as a hexantes or dionkia with an additional (second) pellet above. Despite the lack of examples in the primary references (and we checked more than listed here), there are several examples online.
SH90697. Bronze onkia, HGC 2 315 (R1) corr. (same rev. die); Calciati I p. 283, 13A var. (hound left, etc.); SNG III additions pl. 42, 1328 var. (pellet above, etc.), Choice VF, superb style, weak reverse legend, weight 3.094 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 90o, Eryx (Erice, Sicily) mint, c. 400 - 390 B.C.; obverse beardless, young male head right; reverse EP-YKIN-O-N, dog standing right, head turned back, right foreleg on hare on its back below, pellet right; very rare; SOLD


Geto-Dacian, Roman Republic Imitative, c. 82 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Geto-Dacian,| |Roman| |Republic| |Imitative,| |c.| |82| |B.C.| |-| |1st| |Century| |A.D.||denarius| |serratus|
In ancient Greek and Roman writing Dacus (plural Daci) and Geta (plural Getae) were interchangeable names for tribes of the Dacia region, distinct from but influenced by and possibly related the Thracians and Celts. Modern historians prefer to use the name Geto-Dacians.
CE68430. Silver denarius serratus, cf. Davis C52 and M166; for the Rome mint, C. Mamilius Limetanus, 82 B.C., prototype see: SRCV I 282, Sydenham 741, Crawford 362/1, gVF, weight 3.846 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 135o, tribal mint, c. 82 B.C. - 1st century A.D.; obverse bust of Mercury right wearing winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder; reverse Ulysses (Odysseus) walking right, greeted by his dog Argos, staff in left hand, C MAMIL downward on left, LIMETAN (AT ligate) upwards on right; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

|Caracalla|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Cerberus, a multi-headed (usually three-headed) hound, guards the gates of Hades to prevent those who have crossed the river Styx from ever escaping. Capturing Cerberus alive was the twelfth and final labor King Eurystheus assigned to Hercules. In the underworld, Hercules met Hades and asked his permission to bring Cerberus to the surface. Hades agreed to if Hercules could overpower the beast without using weapons. Hercules was able to overpower Cerberus, sling the beast over his back, and drag it out of Hades through a cavern entrance in the Peloponnese. Eurystheus was so frightened by the beast that, in return for releasing him from his labors, he asked Hercules to return it to the underworld.
RS79607. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 261a (S); RSC III 299; BMCRE V p. 455, 125; SRCV II 6838; Hunter III -, Choice EF, mint luster, well centered on a broad flan, excellent portrait, unusual reverse type, weight 2.825 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 215 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 18 years, consul for the 4th time, father of the country), Pluto seated left on high backed throne, kalathos on head, extending right hand toward Cerberus at his feet on left, long scepter in left hand; rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, C. Mamilius C.f. Limetanus, 82 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |C.| |Mamilius| |C.f.| |Limetanus,| |82| |B.C.||denarius| |serratus|
This type alludes to the moneyer's claim of descent from Telegonus, son of Ulysses and Circe, and hence from Mercury -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
SH21139. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 282, Sydenham 741, Crawford 362/1, RSC I Mamilia 6, toned gVF, weight 3.661 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 82 B.C.; obverse bust of Mercury right wearing winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder; reverse Ulysses walking right, staff in left hand, right extended toward his dog, Argus, C MAMIL downward on left, LIMETAN (AT ligate) upwards on right; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
The ancients did not agree on the attributes of Serapis. A passage in Tacitus affirms that many recognized in this god, Aesculapius, imputing healing to his intervention; some thought him identical with Osiris, the oldest deity of the Egyptians; others regarded him as Jupiter, possessing universal power; but by most he was believed to be the same as Pluto, the "gloomy" Dis Pater of the infernal regions. On this coin, Pluto's influence is evident with the fearsome Kerberos at Serapis' feet.
RX47544. Billon tetradrachm, Kampmann 32.571, Geissen 1094, Dattari 1479, Milne 1399, Emmett 892, BMC Alexandria 623, SRCV II 6739 var. (date), VF, weight 11.945 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 133 - 28 Aug 134 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse Serapis seated left, reaching with right to Cerberus at feet left, long scepter vertical in right, LI - H (regnal year 18) across fields; SOLD







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