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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ GoatView Options:  |  |  | 

Goats on Ancient Coins

Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 27 B.C.

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The Tyche / Sandan type was the only autonomous silver issue of Tarsos. Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
GS86512. Silver drachm, cf. SNG Levante 925; SNG BnF 1295; BMC Lycaonia p. 178, 94; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, VF, bold strike, iridescent toning, tight flan, light marks, slight porosity, weight 3.918 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 164 - 27 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Tyche right, bead and reel border; reverse Sandan standing right on the back of a mythical horned and winged goat-like animal walking right, he draped and wears a high headdress, bow case and sword on his left side, right hand extended, ax in left hand; two monograms behind (off flan), TAPΣEΩN (downward on right); from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $320.00 (Ä281.60)


Ainos, Thrace, c. 440 - 412 B.C.

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Aenus, Enez, Turkey today, was on the southeastern coast of Thrace, near the mouth of the Hebrus River, not far from the Melas Gulf (modern Gulf of Saros), which is formed by the Thracian Chersonesus to the east. The city was said to be founded (or at least settled) by Aeolian migrants from Lesbos. Its mythical and eponymous founder was said to be Aeneus, a son of the god Apollo and father of Cyzicus. Another mythical ruler, named Poltys, son of Poseidon, entertained Heracles when he came to Aenus. In the Iliad, Homer mentions that the leaders of Troy's Thracian allies, Acamas and Peiros, came from Aenus.
GS87868. Silver diobol, May Ainos 176 ff., AMNG II 303, SNG Cop 405, SNG Lockett 1164, Pozzi 1033, McClean 3892, VF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, porous, weight 1.133 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 90o, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, c. 440 - 412 B.C.; obverse head of Hermes right, wearing petasos; reverse AIN, goat standing to right, coiled snake (control symbol) lower right, all withing incuse square; ex Pegasi Numismatics, ex Beast Coins; scarce; $260.00 (Ä228.80)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus won the decisive Battle of Pydna. Perseus of Macedonia was made prisoner and the Third Macedonian War ended. Paullus executed 500 Macedonians, exiled many more to Italy and confiscated their belongings in the name of Rome but according to Plutarch, keeping too much to himself. On the return to Rome in 167 BC, his legions were displeased with their share of the plunder. To keep them happy, Paullus stopped in Epirus, a kingdom suspected of sympathizing with Macedonia; 70 towns were sacked, 150,000 people enslaved, and the region was left bankrupt. Paullus' return to Rome was glorious. With the immense plunder collected in Macedonia and Epirus, he celebrated a spectacular triumph, featuring the captured king of Macedonia himself. The senate awarded him the cognomen Macedonicus.
GB83472. Bronze AE 19, BMC Macedonia p. 48, 40 - 41; AMNG III 51; HGC 3.1 436 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG Evelpidis -, Nice VF, attractive style, nice green patina, weight 5.610 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; obverse ivy-wreathed head of Dionysos right; reverse goat standing right, AMΦIΠO/ΛEITΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; rare; $90.00 (Ä79.20)


Aigai, Aiolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB85812. Bronze AE 16, Gorny & Mosch auction 160, lot 1477 (otherwise apparently unpublished); SNG Cop 14 var. (monograms); SNGvA -; SNG MŁnchen -, BMC Troas -; Lindgren -, aVF, marks and scratches, encrustations, light corrosion, edge crack, weight 2.205 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 315o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse draped bust of Hermes right, wearing petasos; reverse AIΓAEΩN, forepart of goat standing right, monograms (controls) above and right; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; extremely rare; $60.00 (Ä52.80)







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Goats