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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Stag or Doe||View Options:  |  |  | 

Stags or Deer on Ancient Coins
Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 333 B.C.

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |333| |B.C.||obol|NEW
Meshorer-Qedar lists Athena on the obverse, but on the three specimens known to FORVM it is clear that Athena is on the reverse. The types copy contemporary Cypriot stater types from Kition (obverse) and Lapethus (reverse).
GS95808. Silver obol, Meshorer-Qedar 102, cf. Sofaer Collection 63 (hemiobol), HGC 10 -, VF, well centered, toned, struck with worn dies (as are all specimens of this type known to FORVM), weight 0.65 g, maximum diameter 8 mm, die axis 10o, Samaria (10 km NW of Nablus, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse lion right atop and attacking a stag fallen right, (Aramaic 'šn', abbreviating Samarian) above; reverse head of Athena facing, wearing crested Attic helmet; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 11 (22 Feb 2020), lot 1128; ex Canaan Collection; only three sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades (and one of the three is this coin); very rare; $500.00 SALE |PRICE| $450.00
 


Kition, Cyprus, Ba'almelek II, c. 425 - 400 B.C.

|Cyprus|, |Kition,| |Cyprus,| |Ba'almelek| |II,| |c.| |425| |-| |400| |B.C.||stater|NEW
Kition, also known by its Latin name Citium, was a city-kingdom on the southern coast of Cyprus (in present-day Larnaca). According to local tradition, it was established in the 13th century B.C. by Greek (Achaean) settlers, after the Trojan war. Its most famous resident was Zeno of Citium, born c. 334 B.C. in Citium and founder of the Stoic school of philosophy which he taught in Athens from about 300 B.C.
GS95805. Silver stater, BMC Cyprus p. 14, 35, Weber 7691, SNG Cop -, VF, toned, obverse flan flaw, reverse die wear, tight flan, weight 11.1513 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Kition mint, 425 - 400 B.C.; obverse Herakles advancing right, nude but for Nemean Lion's skin on his back with forelegs tied around neck, wielding club over head in right hand, bow in outstretched left hand, ankh (or similar) symbol in right field; reverse lion attacking stag right, inscription above, all within dotted square and incuse square; $440.00 SALE |PRICE| $396.00
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.||sestertius|
During Philip's reign the 1000th anniversary of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated, and magnificent games were held. This coin was issued as part of that celebration and the reverse undoubted depicts one of the animal types displayed and hunted in the Colosseum during the games.
RB87835. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 160a; Cohen V 183, Hunter III 107, SRCV III 9012, VF, nice portrait, well centered, some bumps and scratches, a little rough and porous, edge cracks, traces of shellac(?), weight 16.917 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right, from behind; reverse SAECVLARES AVGG (Secular games [provided by] the Emperors), stag standing right, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The "zoo series" of coins calling on Diana to protect the Emperor was struck late in Gallienus' reign. His father, Valerian, had been particularly dedicated to the worship of Diana the Preserver and had dedicated a temple to her at Rome. Diana apparently did not favor Gallienus. Not long after this coin was struck, he was assassinated near Milan while attempting to deal with the usurper Aureolus.
RB91182. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 728z, Hunter IV S90, RIC V-1 S176, RSC IV 153, SRCV III 10199, EF, traces of silvering, tight flan, weight 2.712 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse IMP GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse DIANAE CONS AVG (to Diana protector of the Emperor), doe walking right with head turned back left, E in exergue; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00
 


Hierocaesarea, Lydia, c. 100 - 150 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Hierocaesarea,| |Lydia,| |c.| |100| |-| |150| |A.D.||AE| |17|
Hierocaesarea from the Greek for 'sacred' and the Latin for 'Caesar's', also known as Hieracome or Hierakome, was a town and bishopric in the late Roman province of Lydia, the metropolitan see of which was Sardis. Judging from its coins, it worshiped the goddess Artemis Persica.
RP92869. Bronze AE 17, Imhoof-Blumer LS 23; RPC III Online 1854; BMC Lydia p. 103, 6; SNG Cop 176; Waddington 5001; SNGvA -; Weber -, VF, nice green patina, obverse off center, broad flan, weight 3.163 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Hierocaesarea (near Sazoba, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 150 A.D.; obverse ΠEPCIKH, bust of Artemis Persica right, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse IEPOKAICA-PE-ΩN (the last two letters in exergue), stag walking right; scarce; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Baris, Pisidia, c. 249 - 251 A.D.,

|Pisidia|, |Baris,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |249| |-| || |251| |A.D.,||AE| |23|NEW
Baris, Pisidia (modern Isparta, Turkey) was on the Roman road about halfway between Sagalassos and Seleukeia. The town struck bronze provincial and semi-autonomous coinage from Hadrian to Trebonianus Gallus and Volusian. There are several remains of Greek Orthodox churches from the Byzantine and Ottoman periods (14th - 19th century). The Byzantine fortress is mostly in ruins.
RP96757. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online IX 925 (1 spec., same dies), Aulock Pisidien II 216, SNG BnF III 1388 (all three refs refer to the same specimen), aVF, green patina, broad flan, marks, pitting, weight 4.616 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Baris (Isparta, Turkey) mint, reign of Trajan Decius, c. 249 - 251 A.D.; obverse BOYΛH, draped and veiled bust of Boule right; reverse BAPHNΩN, Artemis standing slightly right, looking left, bow in left hand, reaching with right hand for an arrow from the quiver at her shoulder, addoresed stags at foot left and right; zero sales of this type on Coin Archives in the last two decades, only two specimens of this type known to FORVM; extremely rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 390 - 320 B.C.

|Ephesos|, |Ephesos,| |Ionia,| |c.| |390| |-| |320| |B.C.||diobol|
In 356 B.C. the temple of Artemis was burned down, according to legend, by a lunatic called Herostratus. Ephesus planned a larger, grander temple and at once started rebuilding. When Alexander the Great defeated the Persian forces at the Battle of Granicus in 334 B.C., the Greek cities of Anatolia were liberated. The pro-Persian tyrant Syrpax and his family were stoned to death, and Alexander was greeted warmly when he entered Ephesus in triumph. When Alexander saw that the temple of Artemis was not yet finished, he proposed to finance it and have his name inscribed on the front. But the Ephesians demurred, saying it was not fitting for one god to build a temple to another.
GS94115. Silver diobol, SNG Kayhan 194; SNG Cop 243; SNGvA 1835; SNG Munchen 32; BMC Ionia p. 53, 53, aVF, dark tone, off center on a tight flan, weight .0885 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 315o, Ephesos mint, c. 390 - 320 B.C.; obverse bee with straight wings, seen from above; reverse confronted heads of two stags, EΦ above; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
The "zoo series" of coins calling on Diana to protect the Emperor was struck late in Gallienus' reign. His father, Valerian, had been particularly dedicated to the worship of Diana the Preserver and had dedicated a temple to her at Rome. Diana apparently did not favor Gallienus. Not long after this coin was struck, he was assassinated near Milan while attempting to deal with the usurper Aureolus.
RA95386. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 728b, RIC V-1 S177, RSC IV 154, SRCV III 10199 (var. IMP GAL...), Hunter IV S90 var. (same), F, well centered, ragged edge, edge split, uneven strike with flat/weak centers, weight 2.867 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse DIANAE CONS AVG (to Diana protector of the Emperor), doe walking right with head turned back left, E in exergue; $26.00 SALE |PRICE| $23.00
 







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